Latest & greatest articles for breast cancer

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Top results for breast cancer

1801. A randomized comparison of sentinel-node biopsy with routine axillary dissection in breast cancer.

A randomized comparison of sentinel-node biopsy with routine axillary dissection in breast cancer. 12904519 2003 08 07 2003 08 13 2007 03 27 1533-4406 349 6 2003 Aug 07 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. A randomized comparison of sentinel-node biopsy with routine axillary dissection in breast cancer. 546-53 Although numerous studies have shown that the status of the sentinel node is an accurate predictor of the status of the axillary nodes in breast cancer, the efficacy (...) and safety of sentinel-node biopsy require validation. From March 1998 to December 1999, we randomly assigned 516 patients with primary breast cancer in whom the tumor was less than or equal to 2 cm in diameter either to sentinel-node biopsy and total axillary dissection (the axillary-dissection group) or to sentinel-node biopsy followed by axillary dissection only if the sentinel node contained metastases (the sentinel-node group). The number of sentinel nodes found was the same in the two groups

NEJM2003

1802. A randomized trial of letrozole in postmenopausal women after five years of tamoxifen therapy for early-stage breast cancer.

A randomized trial of letrozole in postmenopausal women after five years of tamoxifen therapy for early-stage breast cancer. 14551341 2003 11 06 2003 11 10 2014 11 20 1533-4406 349 19 2003 Nov 06 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. A randomized trial of letrozole in postmenopausal women after five years of tamoxifen therapy for early-stage breast cancer. 1793-802 In hormone-dependent breast cancer, five years of postoperative tamoxifen therapy--but not tamoxifen therapy (...) of longer duration--prolongs disease-free and overall survival. The aromatase inhibitor letrozole, by suppressing estrogen production, might improve the outcome after the discontinuation of tamoxifen therapy. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to test the effectiveness of five years of letrozole therapy in postmenopausal women with breast cancer who have completed five years of tamoxifen therapy. The primary end point was disease-free survival. A total of 5187 women were enrolled

NEJM2003

1803. Overview of the main outcomes in breast-cancer prevention trials.

Overview of the main outcomes in breast-cancer prevention trials. 12559863 2003 01 31 2003 02 12 2015 11 19 0140-6736 361 9354 2003 Jan 25 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Overview of the main outcomes in breast-cancer prevention trials. 296-300 Early findings on the use of tamoxifen or raloxifene as prophylaxis against breast cancer have been mixed; we update available data and overview the combined results. All five randomised prevention trials comparing tamoxifen or raloxifene with placebo (...) were included. Relevant data on contralateral breast tumours and side-effects were included from an overview of adjuvant trials of tamoxifen versus control. The tamoxifen prevention trials showed a 38% (95% CI 28-46; p<0.0001) reduction in breast-cancer incidence. There was no effect for breast cancers negative for oestrogen receptor (ER; hazard ratio 1.22 [0.89-1.67]; p=0.21), but ER-positive cancers were decreased by 48% (36-58; p<0.0001) in the tamoxifen prevention trials. Age had no apparent

Lancet2003

1804. Taxane containing regimens for metastatic breast cancer.

Taxane containing regimens for metastatic breast cancer. BACKGROUND: It is generally accepted that taxanes are among the most active chemotherapy agents in the management of metastatic breast cancer. OBJECTIVES: To identify and review the randomised evidence comparing taxane containing chemotherapy regimens with regimens not containing a taxane in the management of women with metastatic breast cancer. SEARCH STRATEGY: The specialised register maintained by the Editorial Base of the Cochrane (...) Breast Cancer Group was searched on 2nd May 2003 using the codes for "advanced breast cancer", "chemotherapy". Details of the search strategy applied by the Group to create the register, and the procedure used to code references, are described in the Group's module on the Cochrane Library. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials comparing taxane-containing chemotherapy regimens with regimens not containing taxanes in women with metastatic breast cancer. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Data were collected

Cochrane2003

1805. Regular self-examination or clinical examination for early detection of breast cancer.

Regular self-examination or clinical examination for early detection of breast cancer. BACKGROUND: Breast self-examination and clinical breast examination have been promoted for many years as general screening methods to diagnose breast cancer at an earlier stage in order to decrease morbidity and or mortality. The possible benefits and harms remain unclear. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether screening for breast cancer by regular self-examination or clinical breast examination reduces breast (...) cancer mortality and morbidity. SEARCH STRATEGY: The Cochrane Library and Medline were searched for randomised trials; date of last search October 2002. The specialised register maintained by the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group was searched. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised clinical trials, including cluster randomised trials. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Decisions on which trials to include were taken independently by the reviewers based on the methods of trial. Disagreements were resolved by discussion

Cochrane2003

1806. A gene-expression signature as a predictor of survival in breast cancer.

A gene-expression signature as a predictor of survival in breast cancer. BACKGROUND: A more accurate means of prognostication in breast cancer will improve the selection of patients for adjuvant systemic therapy. METHODS: Using microarray analysis to evaluate our previously established 70-gene prognosis profile, we classified a series of 295 consecutive patients with primary breast carcinomas as having a gene-expression signature associated with either a poor prognosis or a good prognosis. All (...) patients had stage I or II breast cancer and were younger than 53 years old; 151 had lymph-node-negative disease, and 144 had lymph-node-positive disease. We evaluated the predictive power of the prognosis profile using univariable and multivariable statistical analyses. RESULTS: Among the 295 patients, 180 had a poor-prognosis signature and 115 had a good-prognosis signature, and the mean (+/-SE) overall 10-year survival rates were 54.6+/-4.4 percent and 94.5+/-2.6 percent, respectively. At 10 years

NEJM2002

1807. Regular mammography use is associated with elimination of age-related disparities in size and stage of breast cancer at diagnosis.

Regular mammography use is associated with elimination of age-related disparities in size and stage of breast cancer at diagnosis. BACKGROUND: There is little consensus about recommending mammography for women 75 years of age and older. These women have mammography less frequently and are more likely to receive a diagnosis of advanced breast cancer. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between use of screening mammography and size and stage of cancer at diagnosis in older women. DESIGN (...) : Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Tumor registries in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. PATIENTS: 12 038 women who were Medicare beneficiaries, were at least 69 years of age, resided in a SEER area, and received a new diagnosis of breast cancer in 1995 through 1996. MEASUREMENTS: Screening mammograms obtained in the 2 years before breast cancer diagnosis (none, one, or at least two) and stage and size of tumor at diagnosis. RESULTS: Older women (> or =75 years of age) had

Annals of Internal Medicine2002

1808. Use of postmenopausal hormones, alcohol, and risk for invasive breast cancer.

Use of postmenopausal hormones, alcohol, and risk for invasive breast cancer. BACKGROUND: Physiologic evidence suggests that use of alcohol increases the risk for breast cancer through a hormonal mechanism, but the relationship among breast cancer, alcohol, and postmenopausal hormones (PMH) remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relation between concurrent use of alcohol and PMH and invasive breast cancer. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study SETTING: Nurses' Health Study. PARTICIPANTS: 44 187 (...) postmenopausal women. MEASUREMENTS: Self-reported data on PMH use and breast cancer obtained from biennial questionnaires completed from 1980 to 1994 and average alcohol consumption in 1980, 1984, 1986, and 1990. RESULTS: 1722 women developed invasive breast cancer. Risk for breast cancer was elevated in women who currently used PMH for 5 or more years and did not drink alcohol (relative risk, 1.32 [95% CI, 1.05 to 1.66]) and those who never used PMH but drank 20 or more g (1.5 to 2 drinks) of alcohol daily

Annals of Internal Medicine2002

1809. Cyclin E and survival in patients with breast cancer.

Cyclin E and survival in patients with breast cancer. BACKGROUND: Cyclin E, a regulator of the cell cycle, affects the behavior of breast-cancer cells. We investigated whether levels of cyclin E in the tumor correlated with survival among patients with breast cancer. METHODS: Tumor tissue from 395 patients with breast cancer was assayed for cyclin E, cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and the HER-2/neu oncogene with the use of Western blot analysis. Full-length, low-molecular-weight, and total cyclin E were (...) measured. Immunohistochemical assessments of cyclin E were also made of 256 tumors. We sought correlations between levels of these molecular markers and disease-specific and overall survival. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 6.4 years. A high level of the low-molecular-weight isoforms of cyclin E, as detected by Western blotting, correlated strongly with disease-specific survival whether axillary lymph nodes were negative or positive for metastases (P<0.001). Among 114 patients with stage I breast

NEJM2002

1810. Breast cancer in men.

Breast cancer in men. PURPOSE: Breast cancer in men is uncommon; 1500 new cases are diagnosed in the United States yearly. Optimal management of breast cancer in men is unknown because the rarity of the disease precludes large randomized trials. A review of the literature was undertaken with emphasis on articles published over a 10-year period. DATA SOURCES: Articles published between 1942 and 2000 on breast cancer in men were identified by using CancerLit, MEDLINE, and study bibliographies (...) . STUDY SELECTION: All retrospective series and studies focusing on the epidemiology, risk factors, genetics, and pathology of breast cancer in men. DATA EXTRACTION: Data on the epidemiology, risk factors, genetics, pathology, molecular markers, prognostic factors, therapy, and outcomes of breast cancer in men. DATA SYNTHESIS: Carcinoma of the male breast accounts for 0.8% of all breast cancers. Risk factors include testicular disease, benign breast conditions, age, Jewish ancestry, family history

Annals of Internal Medicine2002

1811. Carcinogenic and endocrine disrupting effects of cigarette smoke and risk of breast cancer.

Carcinogenic and endocrine disrupting effects of cigarette smoke and risk of breast cancer. BACKGROUND: Results of epidemiological studies, assessing the relation between smoking and breast cancer, have been inconclusive. Our aim was to assess the carcinogenic and possibly antioestrogenic effects of cigarette smoke on risk of breast cancer. METHODS: We sent a questionnaire to 1431 women younger than age 75 years who had breast cancer and were listed on the population-based British Columbia (...) cancer registry between June 1, 1988, and June 30, 1989. We also sent questionnaires to 1502 age-matched controls, randomly selected from the 1989 provincial voters list. We obtained information on all known and suspected risk factors for breast cancer, and on lifetime smoking, alcohol consumption, and occupational history. We assessed the effect of smoking separately for premenopausal and postmenopausal women, adjusting for confounding variables. FINDINGS: 318 premenopausal women and 340 controls

Lancet2002

1812. Risk of ovarian cancer in breast-cancer patients with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer: a population-based cohort study.

Risk of ovarian cancer in breast-cancer patients with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer: a population-based cohort study. BACKGROUND: Patients with breast cancer who have mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, have an increased risk of ovarian cancer. Because these mutations are rare, easily obtained information such as age and family history of breast or ovarian cancer might be preferable for assessment of ovarian cancer risk in clinical practice. METHODS: We linked (...) data from the Swedish Cancer Register to the Swedish Generation Register and generated a cohort of 30552 breast-cancer patients born after 1931, with information on breast and ovarian cancer diagnosis from 146117 first-degree relatives. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) with 95% CIs were calculated with nationwide rates of ovarian cancer, adjusted for age and calendar year. FINDINGS: During a mean follow-up of 6 years, 122 incident ovarian cancers were identified in the cohort, yielding

Lancet2002

1813. Prohibitin 3' untranslated region polymorphism and breast cancer risk in Australian women.

Prohibitin 3' untranslated region polymorphism and breast cancer risk in Australian women. A C to T transition within the 3' untranslated region of the prohibitin gene alters mRNA function, and an association between the T allele and an increased risk of breast cancer has been reported in North American women, specifically in those aged under 50 years with a first-degree family history of breast cancer. We did a population-based case-control study to assess whether this association existed (...) in Australian women. We did not note such an association in our sample of 1446 patients and 786 controls (odds ratio 0.96, 95% CI 0.80-1.16; p=0.7), or in subgroups defined by age or family history, or both. Hence, our results do not lend support to the hypothesis that this polymorphism contributes to risk of breast cancer.

Lancet2002

1814. Heritability of mammographic density, a risk factor for breast cancer.

Heritability of mammographic density, a risk factor for breast cancer. BACKGROUND: Women with extensive dense breast tissue visible on a mammogram have a risk of breast cancer that is 1.8 to 6.0 times that of women of the same age with little or no density. Menopausal status, weight, and parity account for 20 to 30 percent of the age-adjusted variation in the percentage of dense tissue. METHODS: We undertook two studies of twins to determine the proportion of the residual variation (...) confidence interval, 54 to 66) in Australian twins, 67 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 59 to 75) in North American twins, and 63 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 59 to 67) in all twins studied. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that the population variation in the percentage of dense tissue on mammography at a given age has high heritability. Because mammographic density is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, finding the genes responsible for this phenotype could

NEJM2002

1815. Effect of mutated TP53 on response of advanced breast cancers to high-dose chemotherapy.

Effect of mutated TP53 on response of advanced breast cancers to high-dose chemotherapy. TP53 activation by genotoxic drugs can induce apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. Thus, whether the gene is mutated or wild type could affect the response of a tumour to chemotherapy. Clinical data are unclear, possibly as a result of heterogeneity of tumours, drugs, methods of assessing response, or TP53 status. We studied 50 non-inflammatory, locally advanced breast cancers that had been treated with high (...) doses of a combination of epirubicin and cyclophosphamide. We noted eight complete responses, which all occurred in the 14 patients with tumours containing mutated TP53 (p<0.0001). In high-grade, advanced breast cancers, inactivation of the TP53 pathway could greatly improve the response to this chemotherapy regimen.

Lancet2002

1816. Breast cancer and breastfeeding: collaborative reanalysis of individual data from 47 epidemiological studies in 30 countries, including 50302 women with breast cancer and 96973 women without the disease.

Breast cancer and breastfeeding: collaborative reanalysis of individual data from 47 epidemiological studies in 30 countries, including 50302 women with breast cancer and 96973 women without the disease. BACKGROUND: Although childbearing is known to protect against breast cancer, whether or not breastfeeding contributes to this protective effect is unclear. METHODS: Individual data from 47 epidemiological studies in 30 countries that included information on breastfeeding patterns and other (...) aspects of childbearing were collected, checked, and analysed centrally, for 50302 women with invasive breast cancer and 96973 controls. Estimates of the relative risk for breast cancer associated with breastfeeding in parous women were obtained after stratification by fine divisions of age, parity, and women's ages when their first child was born, as well as by study and menopausal status. FINDINGS: Women with breast cancer had, on average, fewer births than did controls (2.2 vs 2.6). Furthermore

Lancet2002

1817. Chemoprevention of breast cancer: a summary of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Chemoprevention of breast cancer: a summary of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. PURPOSE: Chemoprevention offers promise as a strategy for reducing morbidity and mortality from breast cancer in women. This review examined the evidence for the effectiveness of chemoprevention in women without a history of breast cancer. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE (1966 to December 2001). STUDY SELECTION: English-language, randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) of chemoprevention of breast cancer (...) in women without a previous diagnosis of breast cancer were examined, and 4 relevant trials, 3 involving tamoxifen and 1 involving raloxifene, were selected. Trials that provided data on the harms of tamoxifen or raloxifene, studies of the costs of chemoprevention, and studies of risk assessment were also reviewed. DATA EXTRACTION: Four reviewers independently abstracted data on key variables, including study population, sample size, randomization, treatment, and outcomes. DATA SYNTHESIS: The largest

Annals of Internal Medicine2002

1818. Oral contraceptives and the risk of breast cancer.

Oral contraceptives and the risk of breast cancer. BACKGROUND: It is uncertain whether the use of an oral contraceptive increases the risk of breast cancer later in life, when the incidence of breast cancer is increased. We conducted a population-based, case-control study to determine the risk of breast cancer among former and current users of oral contraceptives. METHODS: We interviewed women who were 35 to 64 years old. A total of 4575 women with breast cancer and 4682 controls were (...) interviewed. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios as estimates of the relative risk (incidence-density ratios) of breast cancer. RESULTS: The relative risk was 1.0 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.8 to 1.3) for women who were currently using oral contraceptives and 0.9 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.8 to 1.0) for those who had previously used them. The relative risk did not increase consistently with longer periods of use or with higher doses of estrogen. The results

NEJM2002

1819. News media coverage of screening mammography for women in their 40s and tamoxifen for primary prevention of breast cancer.

News media coverage of screening mammography for women in their 40s and tamoxifen for primary prevention of breast cancer. CONTEXT: In the late 1990s, 3 events pertaining to breast cancer prevention received considerable attention in the US news media: a National Institutes of Health (NIH) consensus panel recommended against routine screening mammography for women in their 40s (January 1997), the National Cancer Institute (NCI) subsequently reversed the recommendation (March 1997), and an NCI (...) -sponsored study demonstrated the efficacy of tamoxifen in the primary prevention of breast cancer (April 1998). OBJECTIVE: To examine how the major US news media covered the potential benefits and harms of 2 breast cancer preventive strategies. DESIGN AND SETTING: Content analysis of US news stories reporting on the breast cancer prevention events. We used Lexis-Nexis to search for print news stories in the 10 highest-circulation US newspapers and requested transcripts from 3 major television networks

JAMA2002

1820. Stressful life experiences and risk of relapse of breast cancer: observational cohort study.

Stressful life experiences and risk of relapse of breast cancer: observational cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To confirm, using an observational cohort design, the relation between severely stressful life experiences and relapse of breast cancer found in a previous case-control study. DESIGN: Prospective follow up for five years of a cohort of women newly diagnosed as having breast cancer, collecting data on stressful life experiences, depression, and biological prognostic factors. SETTING: NHS (...) breast clinic, London; 1991-9. PARTICIPANTS: A consecutive series of women aged under 60 newly diagnosed as having a primary operable breast tumour. 202/222 (91%) eligible women participated in the first life experiences interview. 170 (77%) provided complete interview data either up to 5 years after diagnosis or to recurrence. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Recurrence of disease. RESULTS: We controlled for biological prognostic factors (lymph node infiltration and tumour histology), and found no increased

BMJ2002 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro