Latest & greatest articles for breast cancer screening

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Top results for breast cancer screening

141. Combined screening with ultrasound and mammography vs mammography alone in women at elevated risk of breast cancer.

Combined screening with ultrasound and mammography vs mammography alone in women at elevated risk of breast cancer. 18477782 2008 05 14 2008 05 20 2016 12 15 1538-3598 299 18 2008 May 14 JAMA JAMA Combined screening with ultrasound and mammography vs mammography alone in women at elevated risk of breast cancer. 2151-63 10.1001/jama.299.18.2151 Screening ultrasound may depict small, node-negative breast cancers not seen on mammography. To compare the diagnostic yield, defined as the proportion (...) of women with positive screen test results and positive reference standard, and performance of screening with ultrasound plus mammography vs mammography alone in women at elevated risk of breast cancer. From April 2004 to February 2006, 2809 women, with at least heterogeneously dense breast tissue in at least 1 quadrant, were recruited from 21 sites to undergo mammographic and physician-performed ultrasonographic examinations in randomized order by a radiologist masked to the other examination results

JAMA2008 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

142. A systematic review of the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an addition to mammography and ultrasound in screening young women at high risk of breast cancer

A systematic review of the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an addition to mammography and ultrasound in screening young women at high risk of breast cancer A systematic review of the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an addition to mammography and ultrasound in screening young women at high risk of breast cancer A systematic review of the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an addition to mammography and ultrasound in screening young (...) women at high risk of breast cancer Lord S J, Lei W, Craft P, Cawson J N, Morris I, Walleser S, Griffiths A, Parker S, Houssami N CRD summary This review found that adding breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to conventional screening results in a very sensitive strategy for the early detection of breast cancer in young high- risk women. It is unclear to what extent high-risk young women receive the same benefits from early detection and treatment of MRI-detected cancers. These finding are likely

DARE.2007

143. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Screening of Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Screening of Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer The Cancer Care Ontario website has moved - CCO Search CCO The Cancer Care Ontario website has moved To find what you’re looking for, go to and search by keywords. Last modified: Tue, Nov 07, 2017 cancer care ontario | action cancer ontario 620 University Avenue Toronto Ontario, Canada M5G 2L7 Phone: 416.971.9800 Fax: 416.971.6888

Cancer Care Ontario2007

144. [Information to users on cancer screening in women: assessment of current situation and establishment of evidence-based information standards. 1. Information to users on breast cancer screening]

[Information to users on cancer screening in women: assessment of current situation and establishment of evidence-based information standards. 1. Information to users on breast cancer screening] Informacion a usuarias sobre el cribado de cancer en la mujer: Evaluacion de la situacion actual y establecimiento de estandares de informacion basada en la evidencia: 1. Informacion a usuarias sobre el cribado de cancer de mama [Information to users on cancer screening in women: assessment of current (...) situation and establishment of evidence-based information standards. 1. Information to users on breast cancer screening] Informacion a usuarias sobre el cribado de cancer en la mujer: Evaluacion de la situacion actual y establecimiento de estandares de informacion basada en la evidencia: 1. Informacion a usuarias sobre el cribado de cancer de mama [Information to users on cancer screening in women: assessment of current situation and establishment of evidence-based information standards. 1. Information

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2007

145. Effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening for women at high risk of breast cancer

Effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening for women at high risk of breast cancer Effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening for women at high risk of breast cancer Effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening for women at high risk of breast cancer Dunfield L, Severn M Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made (...) for the HTA database. Citation Dunfield L, Severn M. Effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening for women at high risk of breast cancer. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Technology Report No 93. 2007 Authors' objectives "Research Questions; 1. What is the clinical effectiveness of MRI screening compared to film mammography in women with a high risk of breast cancer? 2. What is the cost-effectiveness of MRI screening compared to film mammography

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2007

146. Magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening in women at high risk

Magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening in women at high risk Magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening in women at high risk Magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening in women at high risk Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening in women at high risk (...) . Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. Directory Publication. 2007 Authors' objectives The objectives of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to screen women at high risk for breast cancer are to improve the sensitivity of screening in this group of women, with the goal of providing early diagnosis and reducing the mortality rate associated with breast cancer. Project page URL Final publication URL The report may be purchased from: Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Breast Neoplasms /prevention

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2007

147. Screening mammography for women aged 40 to 49 years at average risk for breast cancer: an evidence-based analysis

Screening mammography for women aged 40 to 49 years at average risk for breast cancer: an evidence-based analysis Screening mammography for women aged 40 to 49 years at average risk for breast cancer: an evidence-based analysis Screening mammography for women aged 40 to 49 years at average risk for breast cancer: an evidence-based analysis Medical Advisory Secretariat Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation (...) of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Medical Advisory Secretariat. Screening mammography for women aged 40 to 49 years at average risk for breast cancer: an evidence-based analysis. Toronto: Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS). Volume 7(1). 2007 Authors' objectives The aim of this review was to determine the effectiveness of screening mammography in women aged 40 to 49 years at average risk for breast cancer. The following questions were asked: Does screening

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2007

149. Does utilization of screening mammography explain racial and ethnic differences in breast cancer?

Does utilization of screening mammography explain racial and ethnic differences in breast cancer? BACKGROUND: Reasons for persistent differences in breast cancer mortality rates among various racial and ethnic groups have been difficult to ascertain. OBJECTIVE: To determine reasons for disparities in breast cancer outcomes across racial and ethnic groups. DESIGN: Prospective cohort. SETTING: The authors pooled data from 7 mammography registries that participate in the National Cancer Institute (...) -funded Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium. Cancer diagnoses were ascertained through linkage with pathology databases; Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results programs; and state tumor registries. PARTICIPANTS: 1,010,515 women 40 years of age and older who had at least 1 mammogram between 1996 and 2002; 17,558 of these women had diagnosed breast cancer. MEASUREMENTS: Patterns of mammography and the probability of inadequate mammography screening were examined. The authors evaluated whether

Annals of Internal Medicine2006

150. [The impact of an extension of breast cancer screening: update of Finohta's report 16/2000]

[The impact of an extension of breast cancer screening: update of Finohta's report 16/2000] Rintasyopaseulonnan laajentamisen vaikutukset. Paivitys Finohtan raporttiin 16/2000 [The impact of an extension of breast cancer screening: update of Finohta's report 16/2000] Rintasyopaseulonnan laajentamisen vaikutukset. Paivitys Finohtan raporttiin 16/2000 [The impact of an extension of breast cancer screening: update of Finohta's report 16/2000] Makela M, Saalasti-Koskinen U, Saarenmaa I, Autti-Ramo (...) I, Expert Group Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Makela M, Saalasti-Koskinen U, Saarenmaa I, Autti-Ramo I, Expert Group. Rintasyopaseulonnan laajentamisen vaikutukset. Paivitys Finohtan raporttiin 16/2000. [The impact of an extension of breast cancer screening: update of Finohta's report 16/2000] Helsinki: Finnish Office

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2006

151. Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations: a simulation study

Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations: a simulation study Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations: a simulation study Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations: a simulation study Jacobi C E (...) , Nagelkerke N J, Van Houwelingen J C, De Bock G H Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The authors studied a programme of mammography screening for women under the age of 50 years from breast cancer families without proven

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2006

152. Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening modalities for breast cancer in Japan with special reference to women aged 40-49 years

Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening modalities for breast cancer in Japan with special reference to women aged 40-49 years Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening modalities for breast cancer in Japan with special reference to women aged 40-49 years Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening modalities for breast cancer in Japan with special reference to women aged 40-49 years Ohnuki K, Kuriyama S, Shoji N, Nishino Y, Tsuji I, Ohuchi N Record Status This is a critical abstract (...) of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Three modalities of screening for breast cancer (BC) were examined: annual clinical breast examination (CBE) alone; annual CBE and screening mammography (SMG) in combination; and biennial CBE and SMG. All screening strategies could

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2006

153. Cost-effectiveness of screening with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging vs X-ray mammography of women at a high familial risk of breast cancer

Cost-effectiveness of screening with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging vs X-ray mammography of women at a high familial risk of breast cancer Cost-effectiveness of screening with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging vs X-ray mammography of women at a high familial risk of breast cancer Cost-effectiveness of screening with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging vs X-ray mammography of women at a high familial risk of breast cancer Griebsch I, Brown J, Boggis C, Dixon (...) drawn. Health technology The study compared three screening strategies aimed at women with a high risk of breast cancer. The strategies compared were mammography (XRM) alone, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE MRI) alone, and a combination of XRM and CE MRI. CE MRI was conducted using a specific protocol with gadopentetate dimeglumine (Magnevists, Schering Healthcare) as the contrast medium (bolus intravenous injection of 0.2 mmol/kg body weight). Type of intervention Screening

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2006

154. Effects of conjugated equine estrogens on breast cancer and mammography screening in postmenopausal women with hysterectomy.

Effects of conjugated equine estrogens on breast cancer and mammography screening in postmenopausal women with hysterectomy. 16609086 2006 04 12 2006 04 14 2016 10 17 1538-3598 295 14 2006 Apr 12 JAMA JAMA Effects of conjugated equine estrogens on breast cancer and mammography screening in postmenopausal women with hysterectomy. 1647-57 The Women's Health Initiative Estrogen-Aone trial comparing conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) with placebo was stopped early because of an increased stroke (...) incidence and no reduction in risk of coronary heart disease. Preliminary results suggesting possible reduction in breast cancers warranted more detailed analysis. To determine the effects of CEE on breast cancers and mammographic findings. Following breast cancer risk assessment, 10,739 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 years with prior hysterectomy were randomized to CEE or placebo at 40 US clinical centers from 1993 through 1998. Mammography screenings and clinical breast examinations were performed

JAMA2006

155. Rate of over-diagnosis of breast cancer 15 years after end of Malmö mammographic screening trial: follow-up study.

Rate of over-diagnosis of breast cancer 15 years after end of Malmö mammographic screening trial: follow-up study. 16517548 2006 03 27 2006 04 07 2016 11 24 1756-1833 332 7543 2006 Mar 25 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Rate of over-diagnosis of breast cancer 15 years after end of Malmö mammographic screening trial: follow-up study. 689-92 To evaluate the rate of over-diagnosis of breast cancer 15 years after the end of the Malmö mammographic screening trial. Follow-up study. Malmö, Sweden. 42 (...) 283 women aged 45-69 years at randomisation. Screening for breast cancer with mammography or not (controls). Screening was offered at the end of the randomisation design to both groups aged 45-54 at randomisation but not to groups aged 55-69 at randomisation. Rate of over-diagnosis of breast cancer (in situ and invasive), calculated as incidence in the invited and control groups, during period of randomised design (period 1), during period after randomised design ended (period 2), and at end

BMJ2006 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

156. Effect of mammographic screening from age 40 years on breast cancer mortality at 10 years' follow-up: a randomised controlled trial.

Effect of mammographic screening from age 40 years on breast cancer mortality at 10 years' follow-up: a randomised controlled trial. 17161727 2006 12 12 2006 12 26 2016 11 24 1474-547X 368 9552 2006 Dec 09 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Effect of mammographic screening from age 40 years on breast cancer mortality at 10 years' follow-up: a randomised controlled trial. 2053-60 The efficacy of screening by mammography has been shown in randomised controlled trials in women aged 50 years and older (...) group of usual medical care. The trial was undertaken in 23 NHS breast-screening units in England, Wales, and Scotland. The primary analysis was based on the intention-to-treat principle and compared mortality rates in the two groups at 10 years' follow-up. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, number ISRCTN24647151. At a mean follow-up of 10.7 years there was a reduction in breast-cancer mortality in the intervention group, in relative and absolute terms

Lancet2006

157. Effect of screening and adjuvant therapy on mortality from breast cancer.

Effect of screening and adjuvant therapy on mortality from breast cancer. BACKGROUND: We used modeling techniques to assess the relative and absolute contributions of screening mammography and adjuvant treatment to the reduction in breast-cancer mortality in the United States from 1975 to 2000. METHODS: A consortium of investigators developed seven independent statistical models of breast-cancer incidence and mortality. All seven groups used the same sources to obtain data on the use (...) of screening mammography, adjuvant treatment, and benefits of treatment with respect to the rate of death from breast cancer. RESULTS: The proportion of the total reduction in the rate of death from breast cancer attributed to screening varied in the seven models from 28 to 65 percent (median, 46 percent), with adjuvant treatment contributing the rest. The variability across models in the absolute contribution of screening was larger than it was for treatment, reflecting the greater uncertainty associated

NEJM2005

158. Diagnostic performance of digital versus film mammography for breast-cancer screening.

Diagnostic performance of digital versus film mammography for breast-cancer screening. BACKGROUND: Film mammography has limited sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer in women with radiographically dense breasts. We assessed whether the use of digital mammography would avoid some of these limitations. METHODS: A total of 49,528 asymptomatic women presenting for screening mammography at 33 sites in the United States and Canada underwent both digital and film mammography. All relevant (...) ), and premenopausal or perimenopausal women (difference, 0.15; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.05 to 0.24; P=0.002). CONCLUSIONS: The overall diagnostic accuracy of digital and film mammography as a means of screening for breast cancer is similar, but digital mammography is more accurate in women under the age of 50 years, women with radiographically dense breasts, and premenopausal or perimenopausal women. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00008346 .) Copyright 2005 Massachusetts Medical Society.

NEJM2005

159. Screening for breast cancer.

Screening for breast cancer. CONTEXT: Breast cancer screening in community practices may be different from that in randomized controlled trials. New screening modalities are becoming available. OBJECTIVES: To review breast cancer screening, especially in the community and to examine evidence about new screening modalities. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: English-language articles of randomized controlled trials assessing effectiveness of breast cancer screening were reviewed, as well as meta (...) -analyses, systematic reviews, studies of breast cancer screening in the community, and guidelines. Also, studies of newer screening modalities were assessed. DATA SYNTHESIS: All major US medical organizations recommend screening mammography for women aged 40 years and older. Screening mammography reduces breast cancer mortality by about 20% to 35% in women aged 50 to 69 years and slightly less in women aged 40 to 49 years at 14 years of follow-up. Approximately 95% of women with abnormalities

JAMA2005 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

160. Breast cancer mortality in Copenhagen after introduction of mammography screening: cohort study.

Breast cancer mortality in Copenhagen after introduction of mammography screening: cohort study. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect on breast cancer mortality during the first 10 years of the mammography service screening programme that was introduced in Copenhagen in 1991. DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING: The mammography service screening programme in Copenhagen, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: All women ever invited to mammography screening in the first 10 years of the programme. Historical, national (...) , and historical national control groups were used. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The main outcome measure was breast cancer mortality. We compared breast cancer mortality in the study group with rates in the control groups, adjusting for age, time period, and region. RESULTS: Breast cancer mortality in the screening period was reduced by 25% (relative risk 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.63 to 0.89) compared with what we would expect in the absence of screening. For women actually participating in screening, breast

BMJ2005 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro