Latest & greatest articles for babies

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Top results for babies

161. Transplantation of umbilical-cord blood in babies with infantile Krabbe's disease.

Transplantation of umbilical-cord blood in babies with infantile Krabbe's disease. BACKGROUND: Infantile Krabbe's disease produces progressive neurologic deterioration and death in early childhood. We hypothesized that transplantation of umbilical-cord blood from unrelated donors before the development of symptoms would favorably alter the natural history of the disease among newborns in whom the disease was diagnosed because of a family history. We compared the outcomes among these newborns (...) with the outcomes among infants who underwent transplantation after the development of symptoms and with the outcomes in an untreated cohort of affected children. METHODS: Eleven asymptomatic newborns (age range, 12 to 44 days) and 14 symptomatic infants (age range, 142 to 352 days) with infantile Krabbe's disease underwent transplantation of umbilical-cord blood from unrelated donors after myeloablative chemotherapy. Engraftment, survival, and neurodevelopmental function were evaluated longitudinally for four

NEJM2005

162. Audio recordings of consultations with doctors for parents of critically sick babies.

Audio recordings of consultations with doctors for parents of critically sick babies. BACKGROUND: Family centred care is an important part of neonatal intensive care. Ensuring effective communication in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is a challenge but is crucial to the implementation of family centred care. Providing parents in NICU with audiotape recordings of their conversations with neonatologists could promote effective communication. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review (...) was to assess the usefulness of providing parents of sick babies with audiotape recordings of their consultations with neonatologists. SEARCH STRATEGY: The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. This included searches of electronic databases: Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library Issue 3, 2004), and MEDLINE (1966 - February 2004); and previous reviews including cross references and expert

Cochrane2005

163. Screening for congenital cataracts: a cost-consequence analysis of eye examination at maternity wards in comparison to well-baby clinics

Screening for congenital cataracts: a cost-consequence analysis of eye examination at maternity wards in comparison to well-baby clinics Screening for congenital cataracts: a cost-consequence analysis of eye examination at maternity wards in comparison to well-baby clinics Screening for congenital cataracts: a cost-consequence analysis of eye examination at maternity wards in comparison to well-baby clinics Magnusson G, Persson U Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic (...) evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The study examined the use of two different eye screening strategies for newborn babies in order to detect congenital cataracts. Mandatory eye screening in maternity wards in combination with well-baby clinic screening was compared with eye

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2005

164. Joint statement on Shaken Baby Syndrome

Joint statement on Shaken Baby Syndrome Joint statement on Shaken Baby Syndrome | Position statements and practice points | Joint statement on Shaken Baby Syndrome | Canadian Paediatric Society Protecting and promoting the health and well-being of children and youth CPS Member Login | Who We Are What We Do Get Involved Education/CPD Publications Careers > Share POSITION STATEMENT Joint statement on Shaken Baby Syndrome Posted: Nov 1 2001 Reaffirmed: Sep 1 2005 The Canadian Paediatric Society (...) of purpose Shaken Baby Syndrome is a preventable tragedy. There are several purposes for the joint statement on Shaken Baby Syndrome as follows: to create a common understanding, based on current evidence, of its definition, cause, outcomes and consequences for the family and community; to stimulate the development of effective ongoing local and national prevention strategies; and to encourage the provision of support for affected children and families. The statement provides a basis for work

Canadian Paediatric Society2005

165. Frequency and natural history of subdural haemorrhages in babies and relation to obstetric factors.

Frequency and natural history of subdural haemorrhages in babies and relation to obstetric factors. BACKGROUND: Subdural haematomas are thought to be uncommon in babies born at term. This view is mainly based on findings in symptomatic neonates and babies in whom subdural haemorrhages are detected fortuitously. We aimed to establish the frequency of subdural haemorrhages in asymptomatic term neonates; to study the natural history of such subdural haematomas; and to ascertain which obstetric (...) factors, if any, are associated with presence of subdural haematoma. METHODS: We did a prospective study in babies who were born in the Jessop wing of the Central Sheffield University Hospitals between March, 2001, and November, 2002. We scanned neonates with a 0.2 T magnetic resonance machine. FINDINGS: 111 babies underwent MRI in this study. 49 were born by normal vertex delivery without instrumentation, 25 by caesarean section, four with forceps, 13 ventouse, 18 failed ventouse leading to forceps

Lancet2004

166. CRIB II: an update of the clinical risk index for babies score.

CRIB II: an update of the clinical risk index for babies score. The clinical risk index for babies (CRIB) score is a risk-adjustment instrument widely used in neonatal intensive care. Its appropriateness with contemporary data has been questioned. We have examined these questions, developed a new five-item CRIB II score with data from a UK-wide sample of infants admitted to neonatal intensive care in 1998-99, and shown how mortality after neonatal intensive care has fallen in the past 12 years

Lancet2003

167. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of mother/baby skin-to-skin care on successful breast feeding

A systematic review of randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of mother/baby skin-to-skin care on successful breast feeding A systematic review of randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of mother/baby skin-to-skin care on successful breast feeding A systematic review of randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of mother/baby skin-to-skin care on successful breast feeding Carfoot S, Williamson P R, Dickson R CRD summary This review concluded that methodological (...) limitations within the identified studies prohibited firm conclusions being reached on the effect of early maternal/baby skin-to-skin contact on the duration of breast-feeding, timing of first breast-feed, or baby physiological factors. This was a well-conducted systematic review and the conclusions seem reliable. Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of early skin-to-skin contact between mother and baby on the initiation and duration of breast-feeding in healthy full-term babies. Searching

DARE.2003

168. Guidelines for general practitioners when a baby dies suddenly and unexpectedly

Guidelines for general practitioners when a baby dies suddenly and unexpectedly Guidelines for general practitioners when a baby dies suddenly and unexpectedly These guidelines have been written to help general practitioners through a stressful and difficult time when they are called to deal with a baby who has died suddenly and unexpectedly. They should be read alongside FSID’s guidelines for the other professionals involved in responding to sudden infant deaths. You need to ensure (...) these guidelines form a part of your PCT strategy. If you are the first person contacted 1. Check the ambulance service and proceed immediately to the scene. 2. If in doubt, resuscitation should always be attempted and continued en route to hospital. 3. If it is quite clear that the baby is dead and cannot be resuscitated it is best to inform the parents sympathetically. 4. If the baby is dead, you may confirm death in the home or you can leave this to the hospital. In all cases the baby should be taken

Publication 10832003

169. Guidelines for health visitors and midwives when a baby dies suddenly and unexpectedly

Guidelines for health visitors and midwives when a baby dies suddenly and unexpectedly Guidelines for health visitors and midwives when a baby dies suddenly and unexpectedly These guidelines have been written to help health visitors and midwives through a stressful and difficult time when they are involved with the family of a baby who has died suddenly and unexpectedly. They should be read alongside FSID’s guidelines for the other professionals responding to sudden infant deaths. You need (...) to ensure these guidelines form a part of your PCT strategy. If you are one of the first on the scene 1. Check that an ambulance has been called 2. If in doubt, resuscitation should always be attempted en route to hospital 3. If the mother goes to hospital with the baby, check on the care of the siblings. If the mother is left alone, arrange for her to be supported by her partner or a friend 4. Give the parents a number where they can contact you 5. Inform the GP and your line manager 6. Spend time

Publication 10832003

170. Short postexposure prophylaxis in newborn babies to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1: NVAZ randomised clinical trial.

Short postexposure prophylaxis in newborn babies to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1: NVAZ randomised clinical trial. 14568737 2003 10 21 2003 12 15 2015 06 16 1474-547X 362 9391 2003 Oct 11 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Short postexposure prophylaxis in newborn babies to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1: NVAZ randomised clinical trial. 1171-7 In sub-Saharan Africa, most women present late for delivery with unknown HIV status, which limits the use of intrapartum (...) nevirapine to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. We aimed to determine whether post-exposure prophylaxis of nevirapine plus zidovudine given to babies only reduced transmission of HIV more than did a regimen of nevirapine alone. We randomly assigned 1119 babies of Malawian women with HIV-1 who presented late (ie, within 2 h of expected delivery) to either nevirapine alone or nevirapine and zidovudine. Both drugs were given immediately after birth: one dose of nevirapine (2 mg/kg weight

Lancet2003

171. Support during pregnancy for women at increased risk of low birthweight babies.

Support during pregnancy for women at increased risk of low birthweight babies. BACKGROUND: Studies consistently show a relationship between social disadvantage and low birthweight. Many countries have programs offering special assistance to women thought to be at risk for giving birth to a low birthweight infant. These programs may include advice and counselling (about nutrition, rest, stress management, alcohol and recreational drug use), tangible assistance (eg transportation to clinic (...) appointments, help with household responsibilities), and emotional support. The programs may be delivered by multidisciplinary teams of health professionals, by specially trained lay workers, or by a combination of lay and professional workers. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of programs offering additional social support for pregnant women who are believed to be at risk for giving birth to preterm or low birthweight babies. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane

Cochrane2003

172. Do women with pre-eclampsia, and their babies, benefit from magnesium sulphate? The Magpie Trial: a randomised placebo-controlled trial.

Do women with pre-eclampsia, and their babies, benefit from magnesium sulphate? The Magpie Trial: a randomised placebo-controlled trial. 12057549 2002 06 11 2002 06 19 2016 12 03 0140-6736 359 9321 2002 Jun 01 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Do women with pre-eclampsia, and their babies, benefit from magnesium sulphate? The Magpie Trial: a randomised placebo-controlled trial. 1877-90 Anticonvulsants are used for pre-eclampsia in the belief they prevent eclamptic convulsions, and so improve (...) outcome. Evidence supported magnesium sulphate as the drug to evaluate. Eligible women (n=10141) had not given birth or were 24 h or less postpartum; blood pressure of 140/90 mm Hg or more, and proteinuria of 1+ (30 mg/dL) or more; and there was clinical uncertainty about magnesium sulphate. Women were randomised in 33 countries to either magnesium sulphate (n=5071) or placebo (n=5070). Primary outcomes were eclampsia and, for women randomised before delivery, death of the baby. Follow up was until

Lancet2002

173. Chest physiotherapy for preventing morbidity in babies being extubated from mechanical ventilation.

Chest physiotherapy for preventing morbidity in babies being extubated from mechanical ventilation. BACKGROUND: Chest physiotherapy has been used to clear secretions and help lung ventilation in newborns who have needed mechanical ventilation for respiratory problems. However concerns about the safety of some forms of chest physiotherapy have been expressed. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of active chest physiotherapy on babies being extubated from mechanical ventilation for neonatal (...) to adequately assess important short and longer term outcomes, including adverse effects. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: The results of this review do not allow development of clear guidelines for clinical practice. Caution is required when interpreting the possible positive effects of chest physiotherapy of a reduction in the use of reintubation and the trend for decreased post-extubation atelectasis as the numbers of babies studied are small, the results are not consistent across trials, data on safety

Cochrane2002

174. Effect on rates of breast feeding of training for the baby friendly hospital initiative.

Effect on rates of breast feeding of training for the baby friendly hospital initiative. PROBLEM: Breastfeeding rates and related hospital practices need improvement in Italy and elsewhere. Training of staff is necessary, but its effectiveness needs assessment. CONTEXT: Eight hospitals in different regions of Italy. DESIGN: Controlled, non-randomised study. Data collected in three phases. Training after the first phase in group 1 hospitals and after the second phase in group 2. STRATEGIES (...) FOR CHANGE: Training of trainers and subsequent training of health workers with a slightly adapted version of the 18 hour Unicef course on breastfeeding management and promotion. KEY MEASURES FOR IMPROVEMENT: Hospital practices, knowledge of 571 health workers, and breastfeeding rates at discharge, three, and six months in 2669 mother and baby pairs. EFFECTS OF CHANGE: After training hospitals improved their compliance with the "ten steps to successful breast feeding," from an average of 2.4 steps

BMJ2001 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

175. Breastfeeding: it is worth trying with the second baby.

Breastfeeding: it is worth trying with the second baby. Mothers who experience breastfeeding difficulties with their first babies and give up breastfeeding are less likely to breastfeed subsequent babies than mothers who do not experience such difficulties. We carried out a longitudinal study of 22 mothers in which milk output was measured at 1 week and 4 weeks after giving birth to their first and second babies. Significantly more breast milk was produced at 1 week for the second lactation (...) (an increase of 31% [95% CI 11-51%]) and the net increase was greatest for those with the lowest milk output on the first occasion (90% [30-149%]). They spent less time feeding their second baby (a decrease of 20% [-34 to -5%]). This increased efficiency of milk transfer was also evident at 4 weeks. Health professionals should encourage women to breastfeed all their children, whatever their experience with their first child.

Lancet2001

176. Labor epidurals improve outcomes for babies of mothers at high risk for unscheduled Cesarean section

Labor epidurals improve outcomes for babies of mothers at high risk for unscheduled Cesarean section Labor epidurals improve outcomes for babies of mothers at high risk for unscheduled Cesarean section Labor epidurals improve outcomes for babies of mothers at high risk for unscheduled Cesarean section Stuart K A, Krakauer H, Schone E, Lin M, Cheng E, Meyer G S Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract (...) 518 mother-baby pairs. Study design This was a historical cross-sectional study. The centres where the intervention took place were not reported. The women were not followed after the epidural placement was performed. Analysis of effectiveness All of the patients included in the initial study sample were considered in the effectiveness study. The outcomes used in the analysis were the probability values of unscheduled Caesarean section, vaginal delivery, and spinal or general or epidural/spinal

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2001

177. Vitamin D Supplementation To Prevent Rickets in Breast-Fed Babies

Vitamin D Supplementation To Prevent Rickets in Breast-Fed Babies Vitamin D Supplementation To Prevent Rickets in Breast-Fed Babies Clinical Highlights Vitamin D Supplementation To Prevent Rickets in Breast-Fed Babies To prevent rickets, dark-skinned infants and children who are fed only breast milk should receive 400 IU of vitamin D supplementation daily, beginning by at least 2 months of age . Select for (149 KB). . Contents Introduction Vitamin D is necessary for proper bone growth (...) , but it is not found in many foods naturally. It is synthesized in the skin with exposure to sunlight, but many babies do not get much exposure to the sun for a number of reasons, such as not spending time outdoors and wearing clothes, hats, or sunscreen. The darker an infant's skin, the more sun exposure is needed to synthesize vitamin D. Although breastfeeding is the ideal form of nutrition for infants, it does not supply the vitamin D needed for healthy bone growth. Nutritional rickets is a condition in which

Publication 3242001

178. Elective caesarean section versus expectant management for delivery of the small baby.

Elective caesarean section versus expectant management for delivery of the small baby. BACKGROUND: Elective caesarean delivery for women in labour with a small or immature baby might reduce the chances of fetal or neonatal death, but it might also increase the risk of maternal morbidity. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of a policy of elective caesarean delivery versus expectant management for small babies. SEARCH STRATEGY: The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register (...) was searched. Date of last search: December 2000. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials comparing a policy of elective caesarean delivery versus expectant management with recourse to caesarean section. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: One reviewer assessed eligibility and trial quality, and both contributed to the update. MAIN RESULTS: Six studies involving 122 women were included. All trials reported recruiting difficulties. Babies in the elective group were less likely to have respiratory

Cochrane2001

179. Elective versus selective caesarean section for delivery of the small baby.

Elective versus selective caesarean section for delivery of the small baby. BACKGROUND: Elective caesarean delivery for women in preterm labour might reduce the chances of fetal or neonatal death, but it might also increase the risk of maternal morbidity. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of a policy of elective caesarean delivery versus selective caesarean delivery for women in preterm labour. SEARCH STRATEGY: The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register was searched. Date (...) found for fetal, neonatal or maternal outcomes. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: There is not enough evidence to evaluate the use of a policy for elective caesarean delivery for small babies. Randomised trials in this area are likely to continue to experience recruitment problems. However, it still may be possible to investigate elective caesarean delivery in preterm babies with cephalic presentations.

Cochrane2001

180. Guidelines relating to the birth of extremely immature babies

Guidelines relating to the birth of extremely immature babies [len:15309, cleaned:] TRPG DRAFT (Revised 16 Thames Regional Perinatal Group Thames Regional Perinatal Group Chairman: Dr Tony Ducker, Medway Maritime Hospital, Gillingham Tel: 01634-825127 Fax: 01634-825128 Honorary Secretary: Dr Ros Thomas, Northwick Park Hospital Tel: 020-8869-3941 Fax: 020-8869-2927 Honorary Treasurer: Dr Andrew Long, Farnborough Hospital Tel: 01689-814189 Fax: 01689-814038 Vice Chairman: Dr Jane Hawdon (...) , University College Hospital Tel: 020-7387-9300 Fax: 020-7380-9775 (Agreed by TRPG 09.03.00) GUIDELINES RELATING TO THE BIRTH OF EXTREMELY IMMATURE BABIES (22-26 WEEKS GESTATION) The role of guidelines is to offer a pattern of care based on current best practice, as a general template for clinicians, particularly those who are less experienced, but who nevertheless may be faced with difficult clinical decisions at times when immediate action may be required. No guideline can be expected to cover every

Publication 10832000