Latest & greatest articles for babies

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Top results for babies

41. Kangaroo mother care may boost the survival of newborn, premature babies

Kangaroo mother care may boost the survival of newborn, premature babies NIHR DC | Signal - Kangaroo mother care may boost the survival of newborn, premature babies Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Kangaroo mother care may boost the survival of newborn, premature babies Published on 23 February 2016 Kangaroo mother care reduced the death rate of newborns by around a quarter compared with conventional care, according to a review of studies from around the world (...) . Other positive outcomes included lower risk of neonatal sepsis, hypothermia, hypoglycaemia, hospital readmission and higher exclusive breast feeding rates. Kangaroo care definitions vary by study, but typically promote mother and baby skin-to-skin contact, sometimes in combination with other elements like promoting breast feeding, and early supported discharge from hospital. Most of the studies in this review looked at premature babies born before 37 weeks and some studies were in low or middle

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

42. A new method for monitoring baby’s heart beat during labour probably not justified

A new method for monitoring baby’s heart beat during labour probably not justified NIHR DC | Signal - A new method for monitoring baby’s heart beat during labour probably not justified Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal A new method for monitoring baby’s heart beat during labour probably not justified Published on 1 March 2016 A new way of monitoring a baby’s distress during labour, called ST waveform analysis, did not improve outcomes for the baby or reduce (...) the likelihood of a caesarean section compared to current practice. Although monitoring of babies’ heartbeats during labour is common practice in the UK, additional ST analysis is not commonly used and on the basis of this evidence probably should not be promoted for routine use yet. The outcomes measured in this review included death of the baby before or after birth, fits and brain damage from low oxygen levels. Finding babies at risk of these rare events is important as urgent delivery may save the baby

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

43. Heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy may be a useful alternative to other forms of respiratory support for preterm babies

Heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy may be a useful alternative to other forms of respiratory support for preterm babies NIHR DC | Signal - Heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy may be a useful alternative to other forms of respiratory support for preterm babies Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy may be a useful alternative to other forms of respiratory support for preterm babies Published on 7 December (...) 2015 This review found that heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy by nose was a safe and effective alternative to other non-invasive methods for supporting breathing for preterm babies. It was less likely to cause nasal injury compared with other methods that used nose tubes. Oxygen therapy is commonly used as a form of breathing support for preterm babies with respiratory distress syndrome, a common complication of premature delivery that makes it hard for a baby to breathe. High-flow

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

44. A trial of probiotics for treating sepsis in very premature babies poses more questions than it answers

A trial of probiotics for treating sepsis in very premature babies poses more questions than it answers NIHR DC | Signal - A trial of probiotics for treating sepsis in very premature babies poses more questions than it answers Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal A trial of probiotics for treating sepsis in very premature babies poses more questions than it answers Published on 23 December 2015 Contrary to a previous review of trials, this large, NIHR-funded trial (...) found that probiotic treatment did not prevent two common life-threatening conditions in very premature babies. The conditions were necrotising enterocolitis, which is a severe gut inflammation/infection that can result in the death of intestinal tissue, and sepsis (blood poisoning) from bacteria that have crossed from the gut into the bloodstream. This trial used a single strain of a harmless bacterium, known as a “probiotic”, prepared to high quality standards fit for medicines, and chosen because

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

45. Giving obese pregnant women metformin had no effect on baby’s weight at birth

Giving obese pregnant women metformin had no effect on baby’s weight at birth NIHR DC | Signal - Giving obese pregnant women metformin had no effect on baby’s weight at birth Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Giving obese pregnant women metformin had no effect on baby’s weight at birth Published on 15 September 2015 A large trial found that giving obese pregnant women the diabetes drug, metformin, to prevent heavier babies, had no effect compared with an inactive (...) dummy tablet. The trial was funded by the NIHR and Medical Research Council, and was the first to give metformin, a diabetes drug that is safe in pregnancy, to pregnant women without type 2 diabetes for this purpose. There are theoretical reasons why the medication may help in reducing a baby’s birthweight and previous studies had shown links between higher glucose levels in mother’s blood and larger babies. Participants received either standard doses of metformin or the inactive tablet from about

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

46. Placing wet gauze on babies’ tummies speeds up urine collection

Placing wet gauze on babies’ tummies speeds up urine collection NIHR DC | Signal - Placing wet gauze on babies’ tummies speeds up urine collection Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Placing wet gauze on babies’ tummies speeds up urine collection Published on 17 October 2017 Almost a third of infants managed to urinate within five minutes after a painless, cheap technique that stimulates the skin, compared with 12% of infants observed only, as is standard practice (...) . The ‘Quick-Wee’ method involved rubbing the babies’ abdomens gently with gauze soaked in cold saline before collecting urine. This trial was carried out with 354 babies aged one to 11 months in one Australian paediatrics emergency room. NICE guidelines recommend non-invasive ‘clean catch’ collection if possible but this can be difficult, especially in young children. They estimate that 20 minutes of staff time can be needed to obtain a sample. Hospital paediatrics settings and primary care may want

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

47. Fewer large babies are born to pregnant woman with type 1 diabetes if their glucose was monitored continuously

Fewer large babies are born to pregnant woman with type 1 diabetes if their glucose was monitored continuously NIHR DC | Signal - Fewer large babies are born to pregnant woman with type 1 diabetes if their glucose was monitored continuously Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Fewer large babies are born to pregnant woman with type 1 diabetes if their glucose was monitored continuously Published on 12 December 2017 Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes who used a continuous (...) glucose monitoring system were half as likely to have a large baby compared with those using standard finger prick blood glucose measurements. Only 15% of infants needed intensive care admissions due to low blood glucose in the continuous glucose monitoring group, compared with 28% born to mothers in the standard finger prick control group. Pregnant women using continuous monitoring spent 7% more time in the target glucose range than those on standard measurements. However, their HbA1c levels, which

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

48. Induction of labour may be considered in pregnant women with a large baby

Induction of labour may be considered in pregnant women with a large baby NIHR DC | Signal - Induction of labour may be considered in pregnant women with a large baby Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Induction of labour may be considered in pregnant women with a large baby Published on 20 June 2017 Induction of labour does not increase the risk of caesarean delivery in pregnant women with a larger than average baby. This is based on a review of four trials (...) of 1190 women with a suspected large baby who were allocated either to have labour induced from 38 weeks or to watchful waiting. Induction did not increase the risk of most negative outcomes for the baby, such as bleeding in the brain, or mother, such as major tearing. However, these outcomes are rare, so a larger number of women would need to be studied to be confident in these findings. When mothers were not induced babies were larger and born about a week later than if they were induced. They did

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

49. WITHDRAWN: Extraction of primary (baby) teeth for unerupted palatally displaced permanent canine teeth in children.

WITHDRAWN: Extraction of primary (baby) teeth for unerupted palatally displaced permanent canine teeth in children. BACKGROUND: The permanent canine tooth in the maxillary (upper) jaw sometimes does not erupt into the mouth correctly. In about 1% to 3% of the population these teeth will be diverted into the roof of the mouth (palatally). It has been suggested that if the primary canine is removed at the right time this palatal eruption might be avoided. This is an update of a Cochrane review

Cochrane2018

50. Long-term risks and benefits associated with cesarean delivery for mother, baby, and subsequent pregnancies: Systematic review and meta-analysis

Long-term risks and benefits associated with cesarean delivery for mother, baby, and subsequent pregnancies: Systematic review and meta-analysis 29360829 2018 02 06 1549-1676 15 1 2018 Jan PLoS medicine PLoS Med. Long-term risks and benefits associated with cesarean delivery for mother, baby, and subsequent pregnancies: Systematic review and meta-analysis. e1002494 10.1371/journal.pmed.1002494 Cesarean birth rates continue to rise worldwide with recent (2016) reported rates of 24.5% in Western (...) Europe, 32% in North America, and 41% in South America. The objective of this systematic review is to describe the long-term risks and benefits of cesarean delivery for mother, baby, and subsequent pregnancies. The primary maternal outcome was pelvic floor dysfunction, the primary baby outcome was asthma, and the primary subsequent pregnancy outcome was perinatal death. Medline, Embase, Cochrane, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases were systematically

EvidenceUpdates2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

51. Identifying perinatal depression with case-finding instruments: a mixed methods study (BaBY PaNDA - Born and Bred in Yorkshire PeriNatal Depression Diagnostic Accuracy)

Identifying perinatal depression with case-finding instruments: a mixed methods study (BaBY PaNDA - Born and Bred in Yorkshire PeriNatal Depression Diagnostic Accuracy) Identifying perinatal depression with case-finding instruments: a mixed methods study (BaBY PaNDA - Born and Bred in Yorkshire PeriNatal Depression Diagnostic Accuracy) Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested

NIHR HTA programme2018

52. Should breastfeeding babies be given pacifiers?

Should breastfeeding babies be given pacifiers? Should breastfeeding babies be given pacifiers? Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Should breastfeeding babies be given pacifiers? View/ Open Date 2012-05 Format Metadata Abstract Do not discourage the use of pacifiers by healthy infants who are breastfeeding

PURLS2018

53. Caesarean section is better for extremely premature breech babies but not necessarily for their mothers

Caesarean section is better for extremely premature breech babies but not necessarily for their mothers NIHR DC | Signal - Caesarean section is better for extremely premature breech babies but not necessarily for their mothers Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Caesarean section is better for extremely premature breech babies but not necessarily for their mothers Published on 5 December 2017 Delivering extremely preterm breech babies (23 to 27 weeks) by caesarean reduced (...) the risk of infant death or brain bleeds by around 40% compared with vaginal delivery. Choice of delivery is a balance of risks for mother and baby. There are immediate risks to the mother associated with anaesthesia and surgery but also risks in subsequent pregnancies following surgery on the immature uterus. In this review, there was limited information on outcomes for the mothers. NICE recommend that the mother is informed of the potential harms and benefits of all options. The harms to the mother

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

54. Concepts for a therapeutic prolongation of nephrogenesis in preterm and low-birth-weight babies must correspond to structural-functional properties in the nephrogenic zone

Concepts for a therapeutic prolongation of nephrogenesis in preterm and low-birth-weight babies must correspond to structural-functional properties in the nephrogenic zone REVIEW Open Access Concepts for a therapeutic prolongation of nephrogenesis in preterm and low-birth- weight babies must correspond to structural-functional properties in the nephrogenic zone Will W. Minuth Abstract Numerous investigations are dealing with anlage of the mammalian kidney and primary development of nephrons (...) . However, only few information is available about the last steps in kidney development leading at birth to a downregulation of morphogen activity in the nephrogenic zone and to a loss of stem cell niches aligned beyond the organ capsule. Surprisingly, these natural changes in the developmental program display similarities to processes occurring in the kidneys of preterm and low-birth-weight babies. Although those babies are born at a time with a principally intact nephrogenic zone and active niches

Molecular and cellular pediatrics2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

55. Effect of a Baby-Led Approach to Complementary Feeding on Infant Growth and Overweight: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Effect of a Baby-Led Approach to Complementary Feeding on Infant Growth and Overweight: A Randomized Clinical Trial 28692728 2017 07 10 2017 09 05 2168-6211 171 9 2017 Sep 01 JAMA pediatrics JAMA Pediatr Effect of a Baby-Led Approach to Complementary Feeding on Infant Growth and Overweight: A Randomized Clinical Trial. 838-846 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.1284 Baby-led approaches to complementary feeding, which promote self-feeding of all nonliquid foods are proposed to improve energy self (...) -regulation and lower obesity risk. However, to date, no randomized clinical trials have studied this proposition. To determine whether a baby-led approach to complementary feeding results in a lower body mass index (BMI) than traditional spoon-feeding. The 2-year Baby-Led Introduction to Solids (BLISS) randomized clinical trial recruited 206 women (168 [81.6%] of European ancestry; 85 [41.3%] primiparous) in late pregnancy from December 19, 2012, through March 17, 2014, as part of a community

EvidenceUpdates2017

56. Babies Can Safely Breastfeed After Their Mothers Have Local Anesthesia for a Dental Procedure

Babies Can Safely Breastfeed After Their Mothers Have Local Anesthesia for a Dental Procedure UTCAT3266, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Babies Can Safely Breastfeed After Their Mothers Have Local Anesthesia for a Dental Procedure Clinical Question Are babies whose mothers have local anesthesia for dental procedures at increased risk for ingesting the anesthetic? Clinical Bottom Line It is safe (...) results After all 7 women received 2% lidocaine without adrenaline, they were instructed to get rid of their milk for 36 hours. Blood was then taken 2 hours after the lidocaine was injected and a milk sample was tested 3 and 6 hours after lidocaine was injected as well. The amount of lidocaine and MEGX, lidocaine’s primary metabolite, was measured. The study showed that if the baby were to drink 90 mL of breast milk every 3 hours after the mother was injected with lidocaine, the amount of lidocaine

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2017

57. A baby-led approach to solids with healthcare parental support does not increase the risk of choking

A baby-led approach to solids with healthcare parental support does not increase the risk of choking Evidencias en pediatría - La alimentación complementaria a demanda con soporte parental educativo no incrementa el riesgo de sofocación Buscando, por favor espere. Mostrar menú Gestión de biblioteca Aún no ha añadido ningún artículo a su biblioteca. | Buscar Toma de decisiones clínicas basadas en pruebas científicas Toma de decisiones clínicas basadas en pruebas científicas Mostrar menú Gestión (...) ve en la imagen. Enviar AVC | Artículos Valorados Críticamente Fangupo LJ, Heath AM, Williams SM, Williams LWE, Morison BJ, Fleming EA, et al . A baby-led approach to eating solids and risk of choking. Revisores: Díaz Cirujano AI 1 , Molina Arias M 2 . 1 CS Rosa Luxemburgo. Madrid. España. 2 Servicio de Gastroenterología. Hospital Infantil Universitario La Paz. Madrid. España. Correspondencia: Ana Isabel Díaz Cirujano. Correo electrónico: Fecha de recepción: 24/03/2017 Fecha de aceptación: 30/03

Evidencias en Pediatría2017

58. National implementation of the baby-friendly hospital initiative

National implementation of the baby-friendly hospital initiative WHO IRIS: National implementation of the baby-friendly hospital initiative Browse Related links Files in This Item: File Description Size Format 3.8 MB Adobe PDF Title: National implementation of the baby-friendly hospital initiative Authors: Issue Date: 2017 Publisher: World Health Organization Place of publication: Geneva Language: English Description: 60 p. Subject: URI: ISBN: 9789241512381 License: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO License

WHO2017

59. National implementation of the baby-friendly hospital initiative: summary

National implementation of the baby-friendly hospital initiative: summary WHO IRIS: National implementation of the baby-friendly hospital initiative: summary Browse Related links Files in This Item: File Description Size Format 673.02 kB Adobe PDF Title: National implementation of the baby-friendly hospital initiative: summary Authors: Issue Date: 2017 Publisher: World Health Organization Place of publication: Geneva Language: English Description: 4 p. Subject: Gov't Doc #: WHO/NMH/NHD/17.4 URI

WHO2017

60. Evidence-based, cost-effective interventions: how many newborn babies can we save?

Evidence-based, cost-effective interventions: how many newborn babies can we save? In this second article of the neonatal survival series, we identify 16 interventions with proven efficacy (implementation under ideal conditions) for neonatal survival and combine them into packages for scaling up in health systems, according to three service delivery modes (outreach, family-community, and facility-based clinical care). All the packages of care are cost effective compared with single (...) mortality and weak health systems through outreach and family-community care, including health education to improve home-care practices, to create demand for skilled care, and to improve care seeking. Simultaneous expansion of clinical care for babies and mothers is essential to achieve the reduction in neonatal deaths needed to meet the Millennium Development Goal for child survival.

Lancet2017