Latest & greatest articles for babies

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Top results for babies

21. Heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy may be a useful alternative to other forms of respiratory support for preterm babies

Heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy may be a useful alternative to other forms of respiratory support for preterm babies Signal - Heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy may be a useful alternative to other forms of respiratory support for preterm babies Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy may be a useful alternative to other forms of respiratory support for preterm babies Published on 7 December 2015 This review found (...) that heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy by nose was a safe and effective alternative to other non-invasive methods for supporting breathing for preterm babies. It was less likely to cause nasal injury compared with other methods that used nose tubes. Oxygen therapy is commonly used as a form of breathing support for preterm babies with respiratory distress syndrome, a common complication of premature delivery that makes it hard for a baby to breathe. High-flow therapy may therefore be used

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

22. Interventions to reduce unnecessary caesarean sections in healthy women and babies.

Interventions to reduce unnecessary caesarean sections in healthy women and babies. Optimising the use of caesarean section (CS) is of global concern. Underuse leads to maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Conversely, overuse of CS has not shown benefits and can create harm. Worldwide, the frequency of CS continues to increase, and interventions to reduce unnecessary CSs have shown little success. Identifying the underlying factors for the continuing increase in CS use could improve

Lancet2018

23. Inhaling a saline mist did not reduce the time in hospital for babies with bronchiolitis

Inhaling a saline mist did not reduce the time in hospital for babies with bronchiolitis Signal - Inhaling a saline mist did not reduce the time in hospital for babies with bronchiolitis Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Inhaling a saline mist did not reduce the time in hospital for babies with bronchiolitis Published on 28 October 2015 In this NIHR-funded trial babies with a viral chest infection (acute bronchiolitis) were treated either with a strong saline mist (nebulised (...) 3% hypertonic sodium chloride) with standard care or standard care alone. The stronger than usual, hypertonic saline mist had no effect on the time it took for babies to be ready for discharge, nor did the trial demonstrate any other benefit from its use. The treatment itself caused some minor side effects in a few babies, such as excessive coughing and a fall in blood oxygen levels. It was also not cost-effective at usual NHS thresholds. The results of the trial should be directly relevant

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

24. Giving obese pregnant women metformin had no effect on baby’s weight at birth

Giving obese pregnant women metformin had no effect on baby’s weight at birth Signal - Giving obese pregnant women metformin had no effect on baby’s weight at birth Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Giving obese pregnant women metformin had no effect on baby’s weight at birth Published on 15 September 2015 A large trial found that giving obese pregnant women the diabetes drug, metformin, to prevent heavier babies, had no effect compared with an inactive dummy tablet (...) . The trial was funded by the NIHR and Medical Research Council, and was the first to give metformin, a diabetes drug that is safe in pregnancy, to pregnant women without type 2 diabetes for this purpose. There are theoretical reasons why the medication may help in reducing a baby’s birthweight and previous studies had shown links between higher glucose levels in mother’s blood and larger babies. Participants received either standard doses of metformin or the inactive tablet from about 12 weeks

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

25. Effect of partograph use on outcomes for women in spontaneous labour at term and their babies.

Effect of partograph use on outcomes for women in spontaneous labour at term and their babies. BACKGROUND: The partograph (sometimes known as partogram) is usually a pre-printed paper form on which labour observations are recorded. The aim of the partograph is to provide a pictorial overview of labour, and to alert midwives and obstetricians to deviations in maternal or fetal well-being and labour progress. Charts have traditionally contained pre-printed alert and action lines. An alert line

Cochrane2018

26. Babies

Babies Top results for babies - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast My query is: English Français Deutsch Čeština Español Magyar Svenska ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button (...) . An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for babies The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical

Trip Latest and Greatest2018

27. New study suggests risk of birth defects in babies born to women on HIV medicine dolutegravir

New study suggests risk of birth defects in babies born to women on HIV medicine dolutegravir European Medicines Agency - News and Events - New study suggests risk of birth defects in babies born to women on HIV medicine dolutegravir Search for medicines Main navigation News and press releases New study suggests risk of birth defects in babies born to women on HIV medicine dolutegravir Press release 18/05/2018 New study suggests risk of birth defects in babies born to women on HIV medicine (...) dolutegravir While EMA review is ongoing, dolutegravir should not be used in women seeking to become pregnant The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is evaluating preliminary results from a study which found 4 cases of birth defects such as spina bifida (malformed spinal cord) in babies born to mothers who became pregnant while taking dolutegravir. While EMA is assessing the new evidence it has issued the following precautionary advice: Dolutegravir HIV medicines should not be prescribed to women seeking

European Medicines Agency - EPARs2018

28. Estimating neonatal length of stay for babies born very preterm

Estimating neonatal length of stay for babies born very preterm 29588296 2018 03 28 1468-2052 2018 Mar 27 Archives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition Arch. Dis. Child. Fetal Neonatal Ed. Estimating neonatal length of stay for babies born very preterm. fetalneonatal-2017-314405 10.1136/archdischild-2017-314405 To predict length of stay in neonatal care for all admissions of very preterm singleton babies. All neonatal units in England. Singleton babies born at 24-31 weeks (...) gestational age from 2011 to 2014. Data were extracted from the National Neonatal Research Database. Competing risks methods were used to investigate the competing outcomes of death in neonatal care or discharge from the neonatal unit. The occurrence of one event prevents the other from occurring. This approach can be used to estimate the percentage of babies alive, or who have been discharged, over time. A total of 20 571 very preterm babies were included. In the competing risks model, gestational age

EvidenceUpdates2018

29. Association between use of systematic reviews and national policy recommendations on screening newborn babies for rare diseases: systematic review and meta-analysis.

Association between use of systematic reviews and national policy recommendations on screening newborn babies for rare diseases: systematic review and meta-analysis. OBJECTIVE: To understand whether international differences in recommendations of whether to screen for rare diseases using the newborn blood spot test might in part be explained by use of systematic review methods. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES: Website searches of 26 national screening organisations

BMJ2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

30. Mother and Baby Units matter: improved outcomes for both

Mother and Baby Units matter: improved outcomes for both 29971155 2018 11 14 2056-4724 4 3 2018 May BJPsych open BJPsych Open Mother and Baby Units matter: improved outcomes for both. 119-125 10.1192/bjo.2018.7 Mother and Baby Units (MBUs) are usually preferred by patients and clinicians. Current provision is limited, although expansion is in progress. To ensure successful investment in services, outcome measurement is vital. To describe maternal outcomes, mother-infant outcomes (...) and their relationship in one MBU. Paired maternal Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores, Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) scores and Crittenden CARE-Index (CCI) mother-infant interaction data were collected at admission and discharge. There were significant improvements in BPRS ( n = 152), HoNOS ( n = 141) and CCI ( n = 62) scores across diagnostic groups. Maternal BPRS scores and mother-infant interaction scores were unrelated. Improvement in maternal HoNOS scores was associated with improved

BJPsych open2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

31. Fewer large babies are born to pregnant woman with type 1 diabetes if their glucose was monitored continuously

Fewer large babies are born to pregnant woman with type 1 diabetes if their glucose was monitored continuously NIHR DC | Signal - Fewer large babies are born to pregnant woman with type 1 diabetes if their glucose was monitored continuously Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Fewer large babies are born to pregnant woman with type 1 diabetes if their glucose was monitored continuously Published on 12 December 2017 Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes who used a continuous (...) glucose monitoring system were half as likely to have a large baby compared with those using standard finger prick blood glucose measurements. Only 15% of infants needed intensive care admissions due to low blood glucose in the continuous glucose monitoring group, compared with 28% born to mothers in the standard finger prick control group. Pregnant women using continuous monitoring spent 7% more time in the target glucose range than those on standard measurements. However, their HbA1c levels, which

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

32. Skin-to-skin contact improves breastfeeding of healthy babies

Skin-to-skin contact improves breastfeeding of healthy babies NIHR DC | Signal - Skin-to-skin contact improves breastfeeding of healthy babies Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Skin-to-skin contact improves breastfeeding of healthy babies Published on 28 March 2017 Early skin-to-skin contact improves breastfeeding of healthy full-term babies. Skin-to-skin contact is the direct contact between a naked baby and the mother’s bare chest. It can occur before or after (...) the baby is cleaned following birth. This review found that about a quarter more women who have this contact with their babies are still breastfeeding at one to four months after birth compared with those who don’t. The evidence that skin-to-skin contact may also help to stabilise the baby’s heart and breathing rates and blood sugar levels after birth was based on fewer trials and less strong. These findings support UK good practice to promote immediate skin-to-skin contact after birth to improve

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

33. Fortified donor breast milk led to similar development for very-low-birthweight babies compared with formula milk

Fortified donor breast milk led to similar development for very-low-birthweight babies compared with formula milk NIHR DC | Signal - Fortified donor breast milk led to similar development for very-low-birthweight babies compared with formula milk Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Fortified donor breast milk led to similar development for very-low-birthweight babies compared with formula milk Published on 18 April 2017 Providing very-low-birthweight babies (...) with fortified human donor breast milk made no difference to their developmental neurological outcomes at 18 months compared with giving formula. This randomised controlled trial looked at 363 babies with birth weights of less than 1500g in neonatal intensive care units in Canada. When the mother’s own milk supply was limited, the babies were given either nutrient-enriched donor breast milk or formula developed for premature babies. There was no difference in their understanding, language, or ability

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

34. Induction of labour may be considered in pregnant women with a large baby

Induction of labour may be considered in pregnant women with a large baby NIHR DC | Signal - Induction of labour may be considered in pregnant women with a large baby Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Induction of labour may be considered in pregnant women with a large baby Published on 20 June 2017 Induction of labour does not increase the risk of caesarean delivery in pregnant women with a larger than average baby. This is based on a review of four trials (...) of 1190 women with a suspected large baby who were allocated either to have labour induced from 38 weeks or to watchful waiting. Induction did not increase the risk of most negative outcomes for the baby, such as bleeding in the brain, or mother, such as major tearing. However, these outcomes are rare, so a larger number of women would need to be studied to be confident in these findings. When mothers were not induced babies were larger and born about a week later than if they were induced. They did

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

35. Antenatal corticosteroids reduce breathing problems in late preterm babies

Antenatal corticosteroids reduce breathing problems in late preterm babies NIHR DC | Signal - Antenatal corticosteroids reduce breathing problems in late preterm babies Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Antenatal corticosteroids reduce breathing problems in late preterm babies Published on 21 February 2017 Giving corticosteroids to women at risk of preterm birth at 34 weeks of pregnancy or later reduced the risk of severe breathing problems in the baby after (...) birth from 1.9% to 1.1%. Steroids also reduced the risk for babies born by planned caesarean section after 37 weeks (so not premature). Steroids are known to be beneficial if given to pregnant women at risk of preterm birth before 34 weeks and are already advised for babies born by caesarean section. This meta-analysis of six large trials provides new evidence that steroids might also benefit premature babies born after the 34th week. However, the review also found steroids increased the risk

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

36. Breastfeeding reduces crying during baby immunisation

Breastfeeding reduces crying during baby immunisation NIHR DC | Signal - Breastfeeding reduces crying during baby immunisation Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Breastfeeding reduces crying during baby immunisation Published on 21 February 2017 Babies who were breastfed before and during routine childhood immunisations cried on average for 38 seconds less and had lower pain scores compared to babies not breastfed. This evidence review used data from 10 trials (...) , with results for 1,066 babies, mostly between one and six months old, following their normal immunisation schedule. Immunisation levels in England are below recommended levels and falling. Pain from injections causes distress to babies and parents, and may put parents off bringing their children for immunisation or finishing the course of treatment over a year. This is the first review to focus studies of breastfeeding for any painful procedure for older babies. The only trials found related

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

37. Placing wet gauze on babies’ tummies speeds up urine collection

Placing wet gauze on babies’ tummies speeds up urine collection NIHR DC | Signal - Placing wet gauze on babies’ tummies speeds up urine collection Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Placing wet gauze on babies’ tummies speeds up urine collection Published on 17 October 2017 Almost a third of infants managed to urinate within five minutes after a painless, cheap technique that stimulates the skin, compared with 12% of infants observed only, as is standard practice (...) . The ‘Quick-Wee’ method involved rubbing the babies’ abdomens gently with gauze soaked in cold saline before collecting urine. This trial was carried out with 354 babies aged one to 11 months in one Australian paediatrics emergency room. NICE guidelines recommend non-invasive ‘clean catch’ collection if possible but this can be difficult, especially in young children. They estimate that 20 minutes of staff time can be needed to obtain a sample. Hospital paediatrics settings and primary care may want

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

38. Supplementary feeding of preterm babies by cup rather than bottle helps breastfeeding success

Supplementary feeding of preterm babies by cup rather than bottle helps breastfeeding success NIHR DC | Signal - Supplementary feeding of preterm babies by cup rather than bottle helps breastfeeding success Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Supplementary feeding of preterm babies by cup rather than bottle helps breastfeeding success Published on 13 December 2016 For women who chose to breastfeed their preterm baby, supplementary feeds with a cup, compared (...) with a bottle, led to improved breastfeeding rates at discharge and up to six months later. Preterm babies who are transitioning from being tube fed to breastfeeds have traditionally been given bottle feeds (of breast milk or formula) to supplement breastfeeding if the mother is unavailable or if additional feeds are thought necessary. This small Cochrane review found evidence that babies were more likely to be fully breastfed or to have at least some breastfeeds when cup feeds were used to supplement

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

39. Assisted reproduction using donated eggs has higher risk of complications for mothers and babies

Assisted reproduction using donated eggs has higher risk of complications for mothers and babies NIHR DC | Signal - Assisted reproduction using donated eggs has higher risk of complications for mothers and babies Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Assisted reproduction using donated eggs has higher risk of complications for mothers and babies Published on 13 December 2016 Assisted reproduction with donated eggs carries about double the chance of some risks (...) for mothers and babies when compared to pregnancies from natural conceptions or assisted reproduction using the woman’s own eggs. These risks include high blood pressure and pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, low birthweight and a higher risk of caesarean section. In multiple pregnancies, high blood pressure and pre-eclampsia can affect more than 25% of mothers carrying multiple pregnancies following donated eggs. This systematic review included a large sample of 16,000 women receiving donor eggs from 35

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

40. Heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy may be a useful alternative to other forms of respiratory support for preterm babies

Heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy may be a useful alternative to other forms of respiratory support for preterm babies NIHR DC | Signal - Heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy may be a useful alternative to other forms of respiratory support for preterm babies Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy may be a useful alternative to other forms of respiratory support for preterm babies Published on 7 December (...) 2015 This review found that heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy by nose was a safe and effective alternative to other non-invasive methods for supporting breathing for preterm babies. It was less likely to cause nasal injury compared with other methods that used nose tubes. Oxygen therapy is commonly used as a form of breathing support for preterm babies with respiratory distress syndrome, a common complication of premature delivery that makes it hard for a baby to breathe. High-flow

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018