Latest & greatest articles for aspirin

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Aspirin

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) more commonly known as aspirin is a painkiller that has a wide range of uses. It is frequently used to treat fever, mild pain, tooth aches, headaches and muscle aches. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and can be used in the management of conditions such as heart attack, arthritis, blood clots and stroke. Aspirin, has been used for thousands of years, initially extracted from the leaves of willow trees.

Aspirin works in much the same way as other NSAIDs but has additional properties, such as antiplatelet activity which can make it additionally useful. More recently aspirin has been linked with cancer prevention. But the potential benefits of aspirin need to be weighed against the potential side effects, which includes gastrointestinal bleeding and Reye’s syndrome. It should be noted that aspirin should not be used in people who are allergic to drugs such as ibuprofen or a more generalized intolerance to NSAIDs. It should also be used cautiously in asthmatics and/or those with bronchospasm associated with NSAID use.

Research evidence, clinical trials and guidelines on Aspirin

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on aspirin ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for aspirin

141. Clopidogrel with aspirin in acute minor stroke or transient ischemic attack.

Clopidogrel with aspirin in acute minor stroke or transient ischemic attack. 23803136 2013 07 04 2013 07 12 2015 07 31 1533-4406 369 1 2013 Jul 04 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Clopidogrel with aspirin in acute minor stroke or transient ischemic attack. 11-9 10.1056/NEJMoa1215340 Stroke is common during the first few weeks after a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or minor ischemic stroke. Combination therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin may provide greater protection (...) against subsequent stroke than aspirin alone. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted at 114 centers in China, we randomly assigned 5170 patients within 24 hours after the onset of minor ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA to combination therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin (clopidogrel at an initial dose of 300 mg, followed by 75 mg per day for 90 days, plus aspirin at a dose of 75 mg per day for the first 21 days) or to placebo plus aspirin (75 mg per day for 90 days). All

NEJM2013

142. Cohort study: Lack of association between proton pump inhibitors and adverse events in patients taking clopidogrel and aspirin

Cohort study: Lack of association between proton pump inhibitors and adverse events in patients taking clopidogrel and aspirin Lack of association between proton pump inhibitors and adverse events in patients taking clopidogrel and aspirin | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name (...) or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Lack of association between proton pump inhibitors and adverse events in patients taking clopidogrel and aspirin Article Text Aetiology Cohort study Lack of association between proton pump inhibitors and adverse events in patients taking clopidogrel and aspirin Ron Waksman 1

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2013

143. Ischaemic stroke: sometimes thrombolysis and very often aspirin

Ischaemic stroke: sometimes thrombolysis and very often aspirin Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Ischaemic stroke: sometimes thrombolysis and very often aspirin '', 1 November 2013 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Ischaemic stroke: sometimes thrombolysis and very often aspirin Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Ischaemic stroke: sometimes (...) thrombolysis and very often aspirin In the acute phase of an ischaemic stroke, some patients benefit from thrombolysis when it is administered within 3 hours. Most patients are treated with aspirin. Some 80% of strokes are of ischaemic origin (blocked vessels). Around 12% of patients die within the three months following the stroke, and 20% remain in an institution or are highly dependent. When a person shows symptoms of a stroke, it is advisable to get them to hospital as quickly as possible so they can

Prescrire2013

144. Cohort study: Low-dose aspirin is associated with an increased risk of haemorrhage; but not in people with diabetes who have a high baseline rate of bleeding

Cohort study: Low-dose aspirin is associated with an increased risk of haemorrhage; but not in people with diabetes who have a high baseline rate of bleeding Low-dose aspirin is associated with an increased risk of haemorrhage; but not in people with diabetes who have a high baseline rate of bleeding | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Low-dose aspirin is associated with an increased risk of haemorrhage; but not in people with diabetes who have a high baseline rate of bleeding Article Text

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2013

145. Systematic review with meta-analysis: Aspirin prophylaxis in people without prior cardiovascular disease does not lead to reductions in cardiovascular death or cancer mortality

Systematic review with meta-analysis: Aspirin prophylaxis in people without prior cardiovascular disease does not lead to reductions in cardiovascular death or cancer mortality Aspirin prophylaxis in people without prior cardiovascular disease does not lead to reductions in cardiovascular death or cancer mortality | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal (...) accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Aspirin prophylaxis in people without prior cardiovascular disease does not lead to reductions in cardiovascular death or cancer mortality Article Text Online articles Systematic review

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2013

146. Randomised controlled trial: Thromboprophylaxis in heart failure patients with sinus rhythm: aspirin and warfarin lead to similar cardiovascular outcomes

Randomised controlled trial: Thromboprophylaxis in heart failure patients with sinus rhythm: aspirin and warfarin lead to similar cardiovascular outcomes Thromboprophylaxis in heart failure patients with sinus rhythm: aspirin and warfarin lead to similar cardiovascular outcomes | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional (...) accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Thromboprophylaxis in heart failure patients with sinus rhythm: aspirin and warfarin lead to similar cardiovascular outcomes Article Text Therapeutics Randomised controlled trial Thromboprophylaxis in heart failure patients

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2013

147. Randomised controlled trial: Aspirin given for up to 2?years after initial anticoagulant treatment reduces the risk of venous thromboembolism recurrence without increasing risk of major bleeding

Randomised controlled trial: Aspirin given for up to 2?years after initial anticoagulant treatment reduces the risk of venous thromboembolism recurrence without increasing risk of major bleeding Aspirin given for up to 2 years after initial anticoagulant treatment reduces the risk of venous thromboembolism recurrence without increasing risk of major bleeding | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in via your (...) Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Aspirin given for up to 2 years after initial anticoagulant treatment reduces the risk of venous

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2013

148. WARFASA: Aspirin for Preventing the Recurrence of Venous Thromboembolism

WARFASA: Aspirin for Preventing the Recurrence of Venous Thromboembolism RXFILES TRIAL SUMMARY MATTHEW SWANKHUIZEN – MAY 2013 – WWW.RXFILES.CA Page 1 of 2 WARFASA: Aspirin for Preventing the Recurrence of Venous Thromboembolism 1 WARFarin and AcetylSalicylic Acid Study BOTTOM LINE • In patients whom have had a first unprovoked VTE with low to moderate bleed risk, the addition of ASA 100 mg daily is reasonable to prevent future DVT not PE or mortality events, if the decision is made to stop VKA (...) ; however, in patients at high risk for recurrence extended anticoagulant therapy should be considered first line. {ASA is not a replacement for warfarin or newer anticoagulants in the initial treatment of VTE.} BACKGROUND • Chest 2012 guidelines suggest that in patients with unprovoked DVT/PE there should be at least 3 months of anticoagulation. After 3 months of treatment, patients should be evaluated for the risk versus benefit ratio of extended therapy Risk for recurrence: Male, Obesity, Positive D

RxFiles2013

149. ASPIRE: Low?Dose Aspirin for Preventing Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism

ASPIRE: Low?Dose Aspirin for Preventing Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism RXFILES TRIAL SUMMARY MATTHEW SWANKHUIZEN – MAY 2013 – WWW.RXFILES.CA Page 1 of 2 ASPIRE: Low-Dose Aspirin for Preventing Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism 1 Aspirin to Prevent Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism BOTTOM LINE • In patients whom have had an unprovoked VTE with low to moderate bleed risk the addition of ASA 100 mg daily is reasonable to prevent future VTE events and major vascular events if the decision is made (...) to stop oral anticoagulation. {ASA is not a replacement for warfarin or newer anticoagulants in the initial treatment of VTE.} BACKGROUND 1,2,3 • Chest 2012 guidelines suggest that in patients with unprovoked DVT/PE there should be at least 3 months of anticoagulation. After 3 months a risk versus benefit evaluation should be conducted and if the patient is low/moderate risk for bleed extended therapy should be considered. 2 • Results from the WARFASA trial suggested that in pts treated initially

RxFiles2013

150. Long-term Use of Aspirin and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

Long-term Use of Aspirin and Age-Related Macular Degeneration. CONTEXT: Aspirin is widely used for relief of pain and for cardioprotective effects. Its use is of concern to ophthalmologists when ocular surgery is being considered and also in the presence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of regular aspirin use with incidence of AMD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The Beaver Dam Eye Study, a longitudinal population-based study of age-related eye (...) diseases conducted in Wisconsin. Examinations were performed every 5 years over a 20-year period (1988-1990 through 2008-2010). Study participants (N = 4926) were aged 43 to 86 years at the baseline examination. At subsequent examinations, participants were asked if they had regularly used aspirin at least twice a week for more than 3 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Incidence of early AMD, late AMD, and 2 subtypes of late AMD (neovascular AMD and pure geographic atrophy), assessed in retinal photographs

JAMA2012 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

151. Adding clopidogrel to aspirin did not reduce recurrent stroke and increased bleeding in lacunar stroke.

Adding clopidogrel to aspirin did not reduce recurrent stroke and increased bleeding in lacunar stroke. ACP Journal Club. Adding clopidogrel to aspirin did not reduce recurrent stroke and increased bleeding in lacunar stroke. - PubMed - NCBI Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search Result Filters Format Summary Summary (text) Abstract Abstract (text) MEDLINE XML PMID List Apply Choose Destination File Clipboard Collections E-mail Order My (...) Bibliography Citation manager Format Create File 1 selected item: 23247951 Format MeSH and Other Data E-mail Subject Additional text E-mail Add to Clipboard Add to Collections Order articles Add to My Bibliography Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Create File 2012 Dec 18;157(12):JC6-2. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-157-12-201212180-02002. ACP Journal Club. Adding clopidogrel to aspirin did not reduce recurrent stroke and increased bleeding in lacunar stroke. 1 , . 1 University

Annals of Internal Medicine2012

152. Is there an association between aspirin dosing and cardiac and bleeding events after treatment of acute coronary syndrome? A systematic review of the literature

Is there an association between aspirin dosing and cardiac and bleeding events after treatment of acute coronary syndrome? A systematic review of the literature Is there an association between aspirin dosing and cardiac and bleeding events after treatment of acute coronary syndrome? A systematic review of the literature Is there an association between aspirin dosing and cardiac and bleeding events after treatment of acute coronary syndrome? A systematic review of the literature Berger JS (...) , Sallum RH, Katona B, Maya J, Ranganathan G, Xu Y, Mwamburi M CRD summary This review concluded that the only difference between high-dose and low-dose aspirin in patients being treated for acute coronary syndrome was increased major bleeding with a higher dose in patients receiving medical therapy. The authors indirectly compared populations for whom the baseline risks were uncertain; therefore the reliability and applicability of their conclusions based on these comparisons is uncertain. Authors

DARE.2012

153. Low-dose aspirin and cancer mortality: a meta-analysis of randomized trials

Low-dose aspirin and cancer mortality: a meta-analysis of randomized trials Low-dose aspirin and cancer mortality: a meta-analysis of randomized trials Low-dose aspirin and cancer mortality: a meta-analysis of randomized trials Mills EJ, Wu P, Alberton M, Kanters S, Lanas A, Lester R CRD summary The review concluded that non-vascular deaths, including cancer deaths, were reduced with low-dose aspirin in the short-term. The review was generally well conducted and the authors’ conclusions seem (...) reasonable. However, the authors’ conclusions (as they recommend) should be considered alongside the risks of low-dose daily aspirin. Authors' objectives To determine whether low-dose aspirin reduced cancer mortality in the shorter term. Searching Ten databases including PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trails, and EMBASE were searched from inception to December 2011 for articles in any language. Search terms were reported. Reference lists of published systematic reviews were also searched

DARE.2012

154. Aspirin use and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis

Aspirin use and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis Aspirin use and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis Aspirin use and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis Luo T, Yan HM, He P, Luo Y, Yang YF, Zheng H CRD summary The review concluded that aspirin use may be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. Both the review and the primary studies had important limitations; in light of this the authors' conclusions seem over-optimistic and are not likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives (...) To evaluate whether aspirin use may be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. Searching MEDLINE was searched from 1966 to July 2011; search terms were reported. The authors stated that no restrictions were applied. The reference lists of reviews and retrieved articles were also searched. Study selection Eligible studies evaluated the association between aspirin and breast cancer and reported odds ratios (OR) or relative risks (RR) with confidence intervals (CI), or data to calculate them

DARE.2012

155. Bleeding risk in randomized controlled trials comparing warfarin and aspirin: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Bleeding risk in randomized controlled trials comparing warfarin and aspirin: a systematic review and meta-analysis Bleeding risk in randomized controlled trials comparing warfarin and aspirin: a systematic review and meta-analysis Bleeding risk in randomized controlled trials comparing warfarin and aspirin: a systematic review and meta-analysis Warkentin AE, Donadini MP, Spencer FA, Lim W, Crowther M CRD summary The authors concluded that no statistically significant difference in major (...) bleeding risk was shown between warfarin (target international normalised ratio 2.0 to 3.5) and aspirin (50mg to 650 mg daily). It appears that the authors' conclusions and recommendations for further practice and research are warranted and reliable. Authors' objectives To assess bleeding risk comparing warfarin and aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) at dose ranges recommended in evidence-based guidelines. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched

DARE.2012

156. Aspirin plus clopidogrel for optimal platelet inhibition following off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery: results from the CRYSSA (prevention of Coronary arteRY bypaSS occlusion after off-pump procedures) randomised study

Aspirin plus clopidogrel for optimal platelet inhibition following off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery: results from the CRYSSA (prevention of Coronary arteRY bypaSS occlusion after off-pump procedures) randomised study 22942294 2012 11 15 2013 01 15 2016 11 25 1468-201X 98 23 2012 Dec Heart (British Cardiac Society) Heart Aspirin plus clopidogrel for optimal platelet inhibition following off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery: results from the CRYSSA (prevention of Coronary (...) arteRY bypaSS occlusion After off-pump procedures) randomised study. 1710-5 10.1136/heartjnl-2012-302449 To determine the individual variability in the response to aspirin and/or clopidogrel and its impact on graft patency after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. A single-centre prospective randomised controlled study designed according to the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement. Randomisation was obtained by a computer-generated algorithm. University medical school in Italy. 300 patients who

EvidenceUpdates2012

157. Aspirin for Dual Prevention of Venous and Arterial Thrombosis.

Aspirin for Dual Prevention of Venous and Arterial Thrombosis. Aspirin for dual prevention of venous and arterial thrombosis. - PubMed - NCBI Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search Result Filters Format Summary Summary (text) Abstract Abstract (text) MEDLINE XML PMID List Apply Choose Destination File Clipboard Collections E-mail Order My Bibliography Citation manager Format Create File 1 selected item: 23121404 Format MeSH and Other Data (...) E-mail Subject Additional text E-mail Add to Clipboard Add to Collections Order articles Add to My Bibliography Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Create File 2012 Nov 22;367(21):2039-41. doi: 10.1056/NEJMe1211480. Epub 2012 Nov 4. Aspirin for dual prevention of venous and arterial thrombosis. . Comment on [N Engl J Med. 2012] [N Engl J Med. 2012] PMID: 23121404 DOI: [Indexed for MEDLINE] Publication types MeSH terms Substances Full Text Sources Medical

NEJM2012

158. Aspirin reduced recurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after a first-ever, unprovoked VTE.

Aspirin reduced recurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after a first-ever, unprovoked VTE. ACP Journal Club. Aspirin reduced recurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after a first-ever, unprovoked VTE. - PubMed - NCBI Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search Result Filters Format Summary Summary (text) Abstract Abstract (text) MEDLINE XML PMID List Apply Choose Destination File Clipboard Collections E-mail Order My Bibliography (...) Citation manager Format Create File 1 selected item: 23070505 Format MeSH and Other Data E-mail Subject Additional text E-mail Add to Clipboard Add to Collections Order articles Add to My Bibliography Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Create File 2012 Oct 16;157(8):JC4-3. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-157-8-201210160-02003. ACP Journal Club. Aspirin reduced recurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after a first-ever, unprovoked VTE. . Comment on [N Engl J Med. 2012] PMID

Annals of Internal Medicine2012

159. Effects of combined aspirin and clopidogrel therapy on cardiovascular outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Effects of combined aspirin and clopidogrel therapy on cardiovascular outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis Effects of combined aspirin and clopidogrel therapy on cardiovascular outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis Effects of combined aspirin and clopidogrel therapy on cardiovascular outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis Zhou YH, Wei X, Lu J, Ye XF, Wu MJ, Xu JF, Qin YY, He J CRD summary The addition of aspirin to clopidogrel resulted in small relative reductions (...) in major cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction and stroke, but it resulted in a relative increase in major bleeding events. The authors' conclusion reflects the evidence presented and seems reliable. Authors' objectives To evaluate the benefits and harms of combined aspirin and clopidogrel therapy on major cardiovascular outcomes. Searching PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched until March, 2011; search terms were reported. To locate

DARE.2012

160. Tranexamic Acid in On-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Without Clopidogrel and Aspirin Cessation: Randomized Trial and 1-Year Follow-Up

Tranexamic Acid in On-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Without Clopidogrel and Aspirin Cessation: Randomized Trial and 1-Year Follow-Up 22959576 2013 02 26 2013 04 23 2013 11 21 1552-6259 95 3 2013 Mar The Annals of thoracic surgery Ann. Thorac. Surg. Tranexamic Acid in on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting without clopidogrel and aspirin cessation: randomized trial and 1-year follow-up. 795-802 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2012.07.015 S0003-4975(12)01627-X Dual antiplatelet therapy is widely (...) used in patients with coronary artery disease and increases the risk of excessive bleeding and transfusion in those undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The study was a prospective, randomized, double-blinded and placebo-controlled trial. Patients undergoing primary and isolated on-pump CABG with their last dose of clopidogrel and aspirin less than 7 days preoperatively were randomly assigned to receive tranexamic acid (15 mg/kg before surgical incision and 15 mg/kg after protamine

EvidenceUpdates2012