Latest & greatest articles for aspirin

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Aspirin

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) more commonly known as aspirin is a painkiller that has a wide range of uses. It is frequently used to treat fever, mild pain, tooth aches, headaches and muscle aches. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and can be used in the management of conditions such as heart attack, arthritis, blood clots and stroke. Aspirin, has been used for thousands of years, initially extracted from the leaves of willow trees.

Aspirin works in much the same way as other NSAIDs but has additional properties, such as antiplatelet activity which can make it additionally useful. More recently aspirin has been linked with cancer prevention. But the potential benefits of aspirin need to be weighed against the potential side effects, which includes gastrointestinal bleeding and Reye’s syndrome. It should be noted that aspirin should not be used in people who are allergic to drugs such as ibuprofen or a more generalized intolerance to NSAIDs. It should also be used cautiously in asthmatics and/or those with bronchospasm associated with NSAID use.

Research evidence, clinical trials and guidelines on Aspirin

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on aspirin ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for aspirin

81. Aspirin use to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancer: a decision analysis

Aspirin use to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancer: a decision analysis Aspirin use to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancer: a decision analysis Aspirin use to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancer: a decision analysis Dehmer SP, Maciosek MV, Flottemesch, TJ Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Dehmer SP (...) , Maciosek MV, Flottemesch, TJ. Aspirin use to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancer: a decision analysis. Rockville: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). AHRQ Publication No. 15-05229-EF-1. 2015 Authors' objectives To assess the net balance of benefits and harms from routine use of aspirin for primary prevention across clinically relevant age, sex, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk groups. Authors' conclusions Benefits are predicted to exceed harms among persons aged 40-69

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2015

82. Aspirin use for the prevention of colorectal cancer: an updated systematic evidence review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

Aspirin use for the prevention of colorectal cancer: an updated systematic evidence review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Aspirin use for the prevention of colorectal cancer: an updated systematic evidence review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Aspirin use for the prevention of colorectal cancer: an updated systematic evidence review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Chubak J, Kamineni A, Buist DS, Anderson ML, Whitlock EP Record Status This is a bibliographic (...) record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Chubak J, Kamineni A, Buist DS, Anderson ML, Whitlock EP. Aspirin use for the prevention of colorectal cancer: an updated systematic evidence review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Rockville: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Evidence Synthesis No. 133. 2015 Authors' objectives We conducted

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2015

83. Effect of clopidogrel with aspirin on functional outcome in TIA or minor stroke: CHANCE substudy

Effect of clopidogrel with aspirin on functional outcome in TIA or minor stroke: CHANCE substudy 26283758 2015 08 18 2015 11 03 2016 12 15 1526-632X 85 7 2015 Aug 18 Neurology Neurology Effect of clopidogrel with aspirin on functional outcome in TIA or minor stroke: CHANCE substudy. 573-9 10.1212/WNL.0000000000001844 We compared the effect of clopidogrel plus aspirin vs aspirin alone on functional outcome and quality of life in the Clopidogrel in High-risk Patients with Acute Non-disabling (...) Cerebrovascular Events (CHANCE) trial of aspirin-clopidogrel vs aspirin alone after acute minor stroke or TIA. Participants were assessed at 90 days for functional outcome using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and quality of life using the EuroQol-5 Dimension (EQ-5D). Poor functional outcome was defined as mRS score of 2-6 at 90 days and poor quality of life as EQ-5D index score of 0.5 or less. Poor functional outcome occurred in 254 patients (9.9%) in the clopidogrel-aspirin group, as compared with 299 (11.6

EvidenceUpdates2015

84. Another good reason to recommend low-dose aspirin

Another good reason to recommend low-dose aspirin Another good reason to recommend low-dose aspirin Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Another good reason to recommend low-dose aspirin View/ Open Date 2015-05 Format Metadata Abstract Evidence shows that daily low-dose aspirin during pregnancy can safely (...) lower the risk of preeclampsia and other adverse outcomes. Practice changer: Prescribe low-dose aspirin (eg, 81 mg/d) to pregnant women who are at high risk for preeclampsia because it reduces the risk of this complication, as well as preterm birth and intrauterine growth restriction. URI Part of Citation Journal of Family Practice, 64(5) 2015: 301-303. Collections hosted by hosted by

PURLS2015

85. Low-Dose Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Use and Colorectal Cancer Risk: A Population-Based, Case-Control Study.

Low-Dose Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Use and Colorectal Cancer Risk: A Population-Based, Case-Control Study. BACKGROUND: A recent comprehensive review concluded that additional research is needed to determine the optimal use of aspirin for cancer prevention. OBJECTIVE: To assess associations between the use of low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and colorectal cancer risk. DESIGN: Population-based, case-control study. SETTING: Northern (...) Denmark. PATIENTS: Patients with first-time colorectal cancer in northern Denmark between 1994 and 2011. Population control participants were selected by risk set sampling. MEASUREMENTS: Data on drug use, comorbid conditions, and history of colonoscopy were obtained from prescription and patient registries. Use of low-dose aspirin (75 to 150 mg) and nonaspirin NSAIDs was defined according to type, estimated dose, duration, and consistency of use. RESULTS: Among 10 280 case patients and 102 800 control

Annals of Internal Medicine2015

86. Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) - co-administered with aspirin alone or with aspirin plus clopidogrel or ticlopidine, is indicated for the prevention of atherothrombotic events in adult patients after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with elevated cardiac biomarker

Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) - co-administered with aspirin alone or with aspirin plus clopidogrel or ticlopidine, is indicated for the prevention of atherothrombotic events in adult patients after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with elevated cardiac biomarker

Scottish Medicines Consortium2015

87. Bleeding Risk and Antithrombotic Strategy in Patients With Sinus Rhythm and Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction Treated With Warfarin or Aspirin

Bleeding Risk and Antithrombotic Strategy in Patients With Sinus Rhythm and Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction Treated With Warfarin or Aspirin 26189039 2015 08 31 2015 11 16 2016 12 15 1879-1913 116 6 2015 Sep 15 The American journal of cardiology Am. J. Cardiol. Bleeding Risk and Antithrombotic Strategy in Patients With Sinus Rhythm and Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction Treated With Warfarin or Aspirin. 904-12 10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.06.016 S0002-9149(15)01532-5 We sought (...) to assess the performance of existing bleeding risk scores, such as the Hypertension, Abnormal Renal/Liver Function, Stroke, Bleeding History or Predisposition, Labile INR, Elderly, Drugs/Alcohol Concomitantly (HAS-BLED) score or the Outpatient Bleeding Risk Index (OBRI), in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) in sinus rhythm (SR) treated with warfarin or aspirin. We calculated HAS-BLED and OBRI risk scores for 2,305 patients with HFrEF in SR enrolled in the Warfarin

EvidenceUpdates2015

88. Clopidogrel With Aspirin in Acute Minor Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack (CHANCE) Trial: One-Year Outcomes

Clopidogrel With Aspirin in Acute Minor Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack (CHANCE) Trial: One-Year Outcomes 25957224 2015 07 07 2015 09 16 2015 07 07 1524-4539 132 1 2015 Jul 07 Circulation Circulation Clopidogrel With Aspirin in Acute Minor Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack (CHANCE) Trial: One-Year Outcomes. 40-6 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.014791 The Clopidogrel in High-risk patients with Acute Non-disabling Cerebrovascular Events (CHANCE) trial showed that the combined treatment (...) of clopidogrel and aspirin decreases the 90-day risk of stroke without increasing hemorrhage in comparison with aspirin alone, but provided insufficient data to establish whether the benefit persisted over a longer period of time beyond the trial termination. We report the 1-year follow-up outcomes of this trial. The trial was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted at 114 centers in China. We randomly assigned 5170 patients within 24 hours after onset of minor stroke or high-risk

EvidenceUpdates2015

89. The prognostic utility of tests of platelet function for the detection of aspirin resistance in patients with established cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease: a systematic review and economic evaluation

The prognostic utility of tests of platelet function for the detection of aspirin resistance in patients with established cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease: a systematic review and economic evaluation The prognostic and diagnostic utility of tests of platelet function for the detection of "aspirin resistance" in patients with established cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease: A systematic review and economic evaluation Journals Library An error has occurred in processing the XML

NIHR HTA programme2015

90. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Aspirin are Effective as Adjunctive Therapy During Non-Surgical Treatment of Chronic Periodontitis

Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Aspirin are Effective as Adjunctive Therapy During Non-Surgical Treatment of Chronic Periodontitis UTCAT2871, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Aspirin are Effective as Adjunctive Therapy During Non-Surgical Treatment of Chronic Periodontitis Clinical Question In patients with chronic periodontitis, does combined dietary omega-3 fatty acids (...) and aspirin reduce the symptoms of periodontitis when compared to a placebo? Clinical Bottom Line Dietary omega-3 fatty acids and aspirin with or without scaling and root planing have been shown to improve clinical parameters of periodontitis, such as reducing probing depths and increasing clinical attachment, in patients with chronic periodontitis. While more long-term studies with comparison to the gold-standard (scaling and root planing) are needed, this combination of drugs shows potential to arrest

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2015

91. Preoperative Continuation of Aspirin with Appropriate Hemostatic Measures Is Currently Recommended.

Preoperative Continuation of Aspirin with Appropriate Hemostatic Measures Is Currently Recommended. UTCAT2850, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Preoperative Continuation of Aspirin with Appropriate Hemostatic Measures Is Currently Recommended Clinical Question In patients taking daily aspirin as anticoagulant therapy, is it safe to perform dental surgery without withdrawal of aspirin? Clinical Bottom (...) Line Evidence indicates that appropriate local hemostatic measures are sufficient to control bleeding problems resulting from dental surgery for patients taking daily aspirin. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Zhao/2015 1752 patients in 10 included studies Meta-Analysis Key results The risk of hemorrhage after tooth extraction was higher in the group continuing their aspirin therapy

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2015

92. Association of aspirin and NSAID use with risk of colorectal cancer according to genetic variants.

Association of aspirin and NSAID use with risk of colorectal cancer according to genetic variants. IMPORTANCE: Use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer. OBJECTIVE: To identify common genetic markers that may confer differential benefit from aspirin or NSAID chemoprevention, we tested gene × environment interactions between regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in relation (...) to risk of colorectal cancer. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Case-control study using data from 5 case-control and 5 cohort studies initiated between 1976 and 2003 across the United States, Canada, Australia, and Germany and including colorectal cancer cases (n=8634) and matched controls (n=8553) ascertained between 1976 and 2011. Participants were all of European descent. EXPOSURES: Genome-wide SNP data and information on regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs and other risk factors. MAIN OUTCOMES

JAMA2015

93. Systematic review with meta-analysis: Low-dose aspirin reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women at high-risk for preeclampsia

Systematic review with meta-analysis: Low-dose aspirin reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women at high-risk for preeclampsia Low-dose aspirin reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women at high-risk for preeclampsia | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name (...) or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Low-dose aspirin reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women at high-risk for preeclampsia Article Text Midwifery Systematic review with meta-analysis Low-dose aspirin reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women at high-risk for preeclampsia Emmanuel Bujold

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2015

94. Systematic review: Updated review identifies no adverse impact on mother or offspring during the perinatal period of aspirin use for prevention of preeclampsia

Systematic review: Updated review identifies no adverse impact on mother or offspring during the perinatal period of aspirin use for prevention of preeclampsia Updated review identifies no adverse impact on mother or offspring during the perinatal period of aspirin use for prevention of preeclampsia | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers (...) of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Updated review identifies no adverse impact on mother or offspring during the perinatal period of aspirin use for prevention of preeclampsia Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Systematic review Updated review

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2015

95. Low-Dose Aspirin for Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Japanese Patients 60 Years or Older With Atherosclerotic Risk Factors: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Low-Dose Aspirin for Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Japanese Patients 60 Years or Older With Atherosclerotic Risk Factors: A Randomized Clinical Trial. IMPORTANCE: Prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases is an important public health priority in Japan due to an aging population. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether daily, low-dose aspirin reduces the incidence of cardiovascular events in older Japanese patients with multiple atherosclerotic risk factors. DESIGN, SETTING (...) . INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomized 1:1 to enteric-coated aspirin 100 mg/d or no aspirin in addition to ongoing medications. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Composite primary outcome was death from cardiovascular causes (myocardial infarction, stroke, and other cardiovascular causes), nonfatal stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic, including undefined cerebrovascular events), and nonfatal myocardial infarction. Secondary outcomes included individual end points. RESULTS: The study was terminated early by the data

JAMA2014

96. Perioperative Aspirin and Clonidine and Risk of Acute Kidney Injury: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Perioperative Aspirin and Clonidine and Risk of Acute Kidney Injury: A Randomized Clinical Trial. IMPORTANCE: Acute kidney injury, a common complication of surgery, is associated with poor outcomes and high health care costs. Some studies suggest aspirin or clonidine administered during the perioperative period reduces the risk of acute kidney injury; however, these effects are uncertain and each intervention has the potential for harm. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether aspirin compared (...) with placebo, and clonidine compared with placebo, alters the risk of perioperative acute kidney injury. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A 2 × 2 factorial randomized, blinded, clinical trial of 6905 patients undergoing noncardiac surgery from 88 centers in 22 countries with consecutive patients enrolled between January 2011 and December 2013. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were assigned to take aspirin (200 mg) or placebo 2 to 4 hours before surgery and then aspirin (100 mg) or placebo daily up to 30 days

JAMA2014

97. Low-Dose Aspirin Use for the Prevention of Morbidity and Mortality From Preeclampsia: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

Low-Dose Aspirin Use for the Prevention of Morbidity and Mortality From Preeclampsia: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. DESCRIPTION: Update of the 1996 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on aspirin prophylaxis in pregnancy. METHODS: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the effectiveness of low-dose aspirin in preventing preeclampsia in women at increased risk and in decreasing adverse maternal and perinatal health outcomes, and assessed (...) the maternal and fetal harms of low-dose aspirin during pregnancy. POPULATION: This recommendation applies to asymptomatic pregnant women who are at increased risk for preeclampsia and who have no prior adverse effects with or contraindications to low-dose aspirin. RECOMMENDATION: The USPSTF recommends the use of low-dose aspirin (81 mg/d) as preventive medication after 12 weeks of gestation in women who are at high risk for preeclampsia. (B recommendation).

Annals of Internal Medicine2014

98. Aspirin as adjunctive treatment for giant cell arteritis.

Aspirin as adjunctive treatment for giant cell arteritis. BACKGROUND: Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a common inflammatory condition that affects medium and large-sized arteries and can cause sudden, permanent blindness. At present there is no alternative to early treatment with high-dose corticosteroids as the recommended standard management. Corticosteroid-induced side effects can develop and further disease-related ischaemic complications can still occur. Alternative and adjunctive therapies (...) are sought. Aspirin has been shown to have effects on the immune-mediated inflammation in GCA, hence it may reduce damage caused in the arterial wall. OBJECTIVES: To assess the safety and effectiveness of low-dose aspirin, as an adjunctive, in the treatment of giant cell arteritis (GCA). SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2013, Issue 12), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid

Cochrane2014

99. Preconception low-dose aspirin and pregnancy outcomes: results from the EAGeR randomised trial.

Preconception low-dose aspirin and pregnancy outcomes: results from the EAGeR randomised trial. BACKGROUND: Preconception-initiated low-dose aspirin might positively affect pregnancy outcomes, but this possibility has not been adequately assessed. Our aim was to investigate whether low-dose aspirin improved livebirth rates in women with one to two previous pregnancy losses. METHODS: In this multicentre, block-randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, women aged 18-40 years who were (...) aspirin (81 mg per day) plus folic acid was compared with placebo plus folic acid for up to six menstrual cycles; for women who conceived, study treatment continued until 36 weeks' gestation. Participants, trial staff, and investigators were masked to the assigned treatment. The primary outcome was livebirth rate, which was analysed by intention to treat. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00467363 . FINDINGS: Overall, 1228 women were recruited and randomly assigned between

Lancet2014

100. Aspirin for VTE prophylaxis in hip and knee replacement surgery

Aspirin for VTE prophylaxis in hip and knee replacement surgery Aspirin for VTE prophylaxis in hip and knee replacement surgery Aspirin for VTE prophylaxis in hip and knee replacement surgery Mitchell MD, Williams K Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Mitchell MD, Williams K. Aspirin for VTE prophylaxis in hip and knee replacement surgery (...) . Philadelphia: Center for Evidence-based Practice (CEP). 2014 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip; Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee; Aspirins; Venous Thromboembolism Language Published English Country of organisation United States English summary An English language summary is available. Address for correspondence Center for Evidence-based Practice, University of Pennsylvania Health System, 3535 Market St. Suite 50, Philadelphia PA 19104

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2014