Latest & greatest articles for aspirin

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Aspirin

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) more commonly known as aspirin is a painkiller that has a wide range of uses. It is frequently used to treat fever, mild pain, tooth aches, headaches and muscle aches. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and can be used in the management of conditions such as heart attack, arthritis, blood clots and stroke. Aspirin, has been used for thousands of years, initially extracted from the leaves of willow trees.

Aspirin works in much the same way as other NSAIDs but has additional properties, such as antiplatelet activity which can make it additionally useful. More recently aspirin has been linked with cancer prevention. But the potential benefits of aspirin need to be weighed against the potential side effects, which includes gastrointestinal bleeding and Reye’s syndrome. It should be noted that aspirin should not be used in people who are allergic to drugs such as ibuprofen or a more generalized intolerance to NSAIDs. It should also be used cautiously in asthmatics and/or those with bronchospasm associated with NSAID use.

Research evidence, clinical trials and guidelines on Aspirin

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on aspirin ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for aspirin

481. Trial of low-dose aspirin plus dipyridamole versus anticoagulants for prevention of aortocoronary vein graft occlusion.

Trial of low-dose aspirin plus dipyridamole versus anticoagulants for prevention of aortocoronary vein graft occlusion. 2567792 1989 08 03 1989 08 03 2015 06 16 0140-6736 2 8653 1989 Jul 01 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Trial of low-dose aspirin plus dipyridamole versus anticoagulants for prevention of aortocoronary vein graft occlusion. 1-7 In a prospective randomised trial, 249 patients who had aortocoronary vein bypass surgery were assigned either to a platelet inhibitory drug regimen (...) or to standard anticoagulant therapy. Treatment was replaced by placebo in half of the patients in each group after 3 months. The platelet inhibitory drug regimen--very low-dose aspirin combined with dipyridamole--was as effective as standard anticoagulant therapy to prevent early and late graft occlusion. Death, myocardial infarction, and severe bleeding occurred significantly more often in patients receiving anticoagulants, whereas mild drug-related gastrointestinal and cerebral side-effects were more

Lancet1989

482. Final report on the aspirin component of the ongoing Physicians' Health Study. Steering Committee of the Physicians' Health Study Research Group.

Final report on the aspirin component of the ongoing Physicians' Health Study. Steering Committee of the Physicians' Health Study Research Group. 2664509 1989 08 15 1989 08 15 2013 11 21 0028-4793 321 3 1989 Jul 20 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Final report on the aspirin component of the ongoing Physicians' Health Study. Steering Committee of the Physicians' Health Study Research Group. 129-35 The Physicians' Health Study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled (...) trial designed to determine whether low-dose aspirin (325 mg every other day) decreases cardiovascular mortality and whether beta carotene reduces the incidence of cancer. The aspirin component was terminated earlier than scheduled, and the preliminary findings were published. We now present detailed analyses of the cardiovascular component for 22,071 participants, at an average follow-up time of 60.2 months. There was a 44 percent reduction in the risk of myocardial infarction (relative risk, 0.56

NEJM1989

483. Randomised trial of intravenous streptokinase, oral aspirin, both, or neither among 17,187 cases of suspected acute myocardial infarction: ISIS-2. ISIS-2 (Second International Study of Infarct Survival) Collaborative Group.

Randomised trial of intravenous streptokinase, oral aspirin, both, or neither among 17,187 cases of suspected acute myocardial infarction: ISIS-2. ISIS-2 (Second International Study of Infarct Survival) Collaborative Group. 2899772 1988 09 08 1988 09 08 2015 06 16 0140-6736 2 8607 1988 Aug 13 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Randomised trial of intravenous streptokinase, oral aspirin, both, or neither among 17,187 cases of suspected acute myocardial infarction: ISIS-2. ISIS-2 (Second (...) International Study of Infarct Survival) Collaborative Group. 349-60 17,187 patients entering 417 hospitals up to 24 hours (median 5 hours) after the onset of suspected acute myocardial infarction were randomised, with placebo control, between: (i) a 1-hour intravenous infusion of 1.5 MU of streptokinase; (ii) one month of 160 mg/day enteric-coated aspirin; (iii) both active treatments; or (iv) neither. Streptokinase alone and aspirin alone each produced a highly significant reduction in 5-week vascular

Lancet1988

484. Effects of ursodeoxycholic acid and aspirin on the formation of lithogenic bile and gallstones during loss of weight.

Effects of ursodeoxycholic acid and aspirin on the formation of lithogenic bile and gallstones during loss of weight. 3200265 1989 01 17 1989 01 17 2013 11 21 0028-4793 319 24 1988 Dec 15 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Effects of ursodeoxycholic acid and aspirin on the formation of lithogenic bile and gallstones during loss of weight. 1567-72 We attempted to determine whether the administration of aspirin or ursodeoxycholic acid during loss of weight could prevent (...) the development of lithogenic changes in bile and the formation of gallstones. Sixty-eight obese subjects without gallstones who were entered in a program (520 kcal per day) to lose weight were randomly assigned to receive ursodeoxycholic acid (1200 mg per day), aspirin (1300 mg per day), or placebo in double-blind fashion for up to 16 weeks. At entry, at four weeks of treatment, and at three weeks after the completion of treatment, the subjects underwent ultrasonography to detect gallstones and duodenal

NEJM1988

485. Aspirin and dipyridamole in the prevention of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.

Aspirin and dipyridamole in the prevention of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. 2967433 1988 07 14 1988 07 14 2013 11 21 0028-4793 318 26 1988 Jun 30 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Aspirin and dipyridamole in the prevention of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. 1714-9 To examine the role of antiplatelet therapy in the prevention of arterial restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA (...) ), we conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 376 patients. The active treatment consisted of an oral aspirin-dipyridamole combination (330 mg-75 mg) given three times daily, beginning 24 hours before PTCA. Eight hours before PTCA, the oral dipyridamole was replaced with intravenous dipyridamole at a dosage of 10 mg per hour for 24 hours, and oral aspirin was continued. Sixteen hours after PTCA, the initial combination was reinstituted. Treatment was continued in patients

NEJM1988

486. Aspirin, heparin, or both to treat acute unstable angina.

Aspirin, heparin, or both to treat acute unstable angina. 3050522 1988 11 15 1988 11 15 2013 11 21 0028-4793 319 17 1988 Oct 27 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Aspirin, heparin, or both to treat acute unstable angina. 1105-11 We tested the usefulness of aspirin (325 mg twice daily), heparin (1000 units per hour by intravenous infusion), and a combination of the two in the early management of acute unstable angina pectoris in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled (...) (P = 0.002). The incidence of myocardial infarction was significantly reduced in the groups receiving aspirin (3 percent; P = 0.01), heparin (0.8 percent; P less than 0.001), and aspirin plus heparin (1.6 percent, P = 0.003), and no deaths occurred in these groups. There were too few deaths overall to permit evaluation of the effect of treatment on this end point. The combination of aspirin and heparin had no greater protective effect than heparin alone but was associated with slightly more

NEJM1988

487. Low-dose aspirin prevents pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia in angiotensin-sensitive primigravidae.

Low-dose aspirin prevents pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia in angiotensin-sensitive primigravidae. 2867260 1986 02 06 1986 02 06 2015 06 16 0140-6736 1 8471 1986 Jan 04 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Low-dose aspirin prevents pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia in angiotensin-sensitive primigravidae. 1-3 The possibility of preventing pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and pre-eclampsia in primigravidae by suppressing production of thromboxane A2 with low-dose (...) aspirin was investigated in a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. 46 normotensive women at 28 weeks' gestation, judged to be at risk of PIH or pre-eclampsia because of an increased blood-pressure response to intravenously infused angiotensin II, were studied. 23 women received 60 mg aspirin daily, and the same number received matching placebo until delivery. In the placebo group PIH, pre-eclampsia, and eclampsia developed in 4, 7, and 1 cases, respectively, whereas only 2 women

Lancet1986

488. Aspirin, sulfinpyrazone, or both in unstable angina. Results of a Canadian multicenter trial.

Aspirin, sulfinpyrazone, or both in unstable angina. Results of a Canadian multicenter trial. 3903504 1985 12 16 1985 12 16 2013 11 21 0028-4793 313 22 1985 Nov 28 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Aspirin, sulfinpyrazone, or both in unstable angina. Results of a Canadian multicenter trial. 1369-75 We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 555 patients with unstable angina who were hospitalized in coronary care units. Patients received one of four (...) possible treatment regimens: aspirin (325 mg four times daily), sulfinpyrazone (200 mg four times daily), both, or neither. They were entered into the trial within eight days of hospitalization and were treated and followed for up to two years (mean, 18 months). The incidence of cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction, considered together, was 8.6 per cent in the groups given aspirin and 17.0 per cent in the other groups, representing a risk reduction with aspirin of 51 per cent (P = 0.008

NEJM1985

489. Effect of dipyridamole and aspirin on late vein-graft patency after coronary bypass operations.

Effect of dipyridamole and aspirin on late vein-graft patency after coronary bypass operations. 6361561 1984 02 14 1984 02 14 2013 11 21 0028-4793 310 4 1984 Jan 26 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Effect of dipyridamole and aspirin on late vein-graft patency after coronary bypass operations. 209-14 To study the prevention of occlusion of aortocoronary-artery bypass grafts, we concluded a prospective, randomized, double-blind trial comparing long-term administration (...) of dipyridamole (begun two days before operation) plus aspirin (begun seven hours after operation) with placebo in 407 patients. Results at one month showed a reduction in the rate of graft occlusion in patients receiving dipyridamole and aspirin. At vein-graft angiography performed in 343 patients (84 per cent) 11 to 18 months (median, 12 months) after operation, 11 per cent of 478 vein-graft distal anastomoses were occluded in the treated group, and 25 per cent of 486 were occluded in the placebo group

NEJM1984

490. Improved aortocoronary bypass patency by low-dose aspirin (100 mg daily). Effects on platelet aggregation and thromboxane formation.

Improved aortocoronary bypass patency by low-dose aspirin (100 mg daily). Effects on platelet aggregation and thromboxane formation. 6144975 1984 07 16 1984 07 16 2015 06 16 0140-6736 1 8389 1984 Jun 09 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Improved aortocoronary bypass patency by low-dose aspirin (100 mg daily). Effects on platelet aggregation and thromboxane formation. 1261-4 Prevention of aortocoronary bypass occlusion by aspirin (ASA, 1 X 100 mg per day) was studied in a prospective double-blind (...) trial of 83 patients. 60 (72%) were randomly allocated to ASA or placebo starting 24 h after operation. 90% of grafts in the ASA group and 68% in the placebo group were patent at four months. At least one anastomosis was occluded in 62% of the patients on placebo and in 27% of those on aspirin. Ventricular arrhythmias increased after surgery in more patients on placebo (12/18) than in patients on ASA (5/17). Platelet thromboxane formation on collagen tested before operation was significantly higher

Lancet1984

491. Protective effects of aspirin against acute myocardial infarction and death in men with unstable angina. Results of a Veterans Administration Cooperative Study.

Protective effects of aspirin against acute myocardial infarction and death in men with unstable angina. Results of a Veterans Administration Cooperative Study. 6135989 1983 09 09 1983 09 09 2013 11 21 0028-4793 309 7 1983 Aug 18 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Protective effects of aspirin against acute myocardial infarction and death in men with unstable angina. Results of a Veterans Administration Cooperative Study. 396-403 We conducted a multicenter, double-blind (...) , placebo-controlled randomized trial of aspirin treatment (324 mg in buffered solution daily) for 12 weeks in 1266 men with unstable angina (625 taking aspirin and 641 placebo). The principal end points were death and acute myocardial infarction diagnosed by the presence of creatine kinase MB or pathologic Q-wave changes on electrocardiograms. The incidence of death or acute myocardial infarction was 51 per cent lower in the aspirin group than in the placebo group: 31 patients (5.0 per cent

NEJM1983

492. Aspirin-sulfinpyrazone in prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis in total hip replacement.

Aspirin-sulfinpyrazone in prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis in total hip replacement. 6355542 1983 12 17 1983 12 17 2016 10 17 0098-7484 250 19 1983 Nov 18 JAMA JAMA Aspirin-sulfinpyrazone in prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis in total hip replacement. 2649-54 In postoperative hip arthroplasty patients, treatment with aspirin and sulfinpyrazone resulted in a statistically significant reduction of venographically diagnosed thrombi in the proximal veins of the leg. This reduction was most (...) J J JJ Larson D E DE Chen H M HM Milbauer J P JP Treuhaft P S PS Plotka E D ED eng 1-HB-42977 HB NHLBI NIH HHS United States Clinical Trial Journal Article Randomized Controlled Trial Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S. United States JAMA 7501160 0098-7484 R16CO5Y76E Aspirin V6OFU47K3W Sulfinpyrazone AIM IM Adult Aged Aspirin administration & dosage Clinical Trials as Topic Double-Blind Method Drug Therapy, Combination Female Hip Prosthesis Humans Male Middle Aged Postoperative Complications

JAMA1983

493. A controlled comparison of aspirin and oral anticoagulants in prevention of death after myocardial infarction.

A controlled comparison of aspirin and oral anticoagulants in prevention of death after myocardial infarction. 7050710 1982 10 12 1982 10 12 2013 11 21 0028-4793 307 12 1982 Sep 16 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. A controlled comparison of aspirin and oral anticoagulants in prevention of death after myocardial infarction. 701-8 Although neither aspirin nor oral anticoagulants have been conclusively shown to reduce mortality in patients surviving myocardial infarction, both (...) have been widely used for that purpose. In the present clinical trial we compared the effects of aspirin (0.5 g given three times a day) and oral-anticoagulant therapy. Of 6908 patients considered for entry, 1303 were randomized to anticoagulant (652) or aspirin (651) an average of 11.4 days after the onset of myocardial infarction and were followed for 6 to 59 months (mean, 29 months). There were 65 deaths in the anticoagulant group and 72 in the aspirin group. The number of patients

NEJM1982

494. A platelet-inhibitor-drug trial in coronary-artery bypass operations: benefit of perioperative dipyridamole and aspirin therapy on early postoperative vein-graft patency.

A platelet-inhibitor-drug trial in coronary-artery bypass operations: benefit of perioperative dipyridamole and aspirin therapy on early postoperative vein-graft patency. 7045659 1982 08 07 1982 08 07 2013 11 21 0028-4793 307 2 1982 Jul 08 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. A platelet-inhibitor-drug trial in coronary-artery bypass operations: benefit of perioperative dipyridamole and aspirin therapy on early postoperative vein-graft patency. 73-8 To prevent occlusion (...) of aortocoronary-artery-bypass grafts, we conducted a prospective, randomized-double-blind trial comparing dipyridamole (instituted two days before operation) plus aspirin (added seven hours after operation) with placebo in 407 patients. Vein-graft angiography was performed in 360 patients (88 per cent) within six months of operation (median, eight days). Within one month of operation, 3 per cent of vein-graft distal anastomoses (10 of 351) were occluded in the treated patients, and 10 per cent (38 of 362

NEJM1982

495. Trial of dipyridamole-aspirin in recurring venous thrombosis.

Trial of dipyridamole-aspirin in recurring venous thrombosis. 6109150 1981 03 17 1981 03 17 2015 06 16 0140-6736 2 8208-8209 1980 Dec 20-27 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Trial of dipyridamole-aspirin in recurring venous thrombosis. 1328-9 38 patients (26 men) with recurring venous thromboembolism (RVTE) were enrolled in a prospective double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of dipyridamole (DPY), 100 mg a day, and aspirin (ASA), 1200 mg a day. Platelet survival (51Cr labelling of autologous (...) platelets) was measured every 6 months for 18 months. 19 patients were randomised to treatment with DPY and ASA, and 1 had new venous thrombosis (after 15 months of treatment); 19 received placebo and 7 had new venous thrombosis (4--16 months later (chi 2 = 5.70; p< 0.05). DPY-ASA increased platelet survival whereas placebo treatment did not. The results suggest that in patients with RVTE and abnormal platelet survival time DPY in combination with ASA decreases the frequency of new venous thrombosis

Lancet1981

496. Aspirin and secondary mortality after myocardial infarction.

Aspirin and secondary mortality after myocardial infarction. 92668 1980 02 28 1980 02 28 2015 06 16 0140-6736 2 8156-8157 1979 Dec 22-29 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Aspirin and secondary mortality after myocardial infarction. 1313-5 A randomised controlled double-blind trial of aspirin in the prevention of death was conducted in 1682 patients (including 248 women) who had had a confirmed myocardial infarct (MI). 25% of the patients were admitted to the trial within 3 days of the infarction (...) and 50% within 7 days. Aspirin, 300 mg three times daily, was given for 1 yr. Total mortality was 12.3% in patients given aspirin and 14.8% in those given placebo, a reduction by aspirin of 17%, which was not statistically significant at p less than 0.05. The reduction in specific ischaemic-heart-disease (IHD) mortality was 22% and in total mortality plus IHD morbidity (readmission to hospital for MI in survivors) was 28%. Elwood P C PC Sweetnam P M PM eng Clinical Trial Journal Article Randomized

Lancet1980

497. Comparison of the effects of regular and enteric-coated aspirin on gastroduodenal mucosa of man.

Comparison of the effects of regular and enteric-coated aspirin on gastroduodenal mucosa of man. 6107406 1981 01 26 1981 01 26 2015 06 16 0140-6736 2 8195 pt 1 1980 Sep 20 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Comparison of the effects of regular and enteric-coated aspirin on gastroduodenal mucosa of man. 609-12 To determine whether the topical or systemic effects of aspirin are of greater importance in the production of gastroduodenal mucosal damage, the effects of regular and enteric-coated aspirin (...) were compared in 9 healthy volunteers in a 2-week crossover endoscopic study. All subjects developed multiple gastric erosions while taking regular aspirin; 2 subjects developed one gastric erosion each while taking enteric-coated aspirin. 5 subjects developed duodenal erosions while taking regular aspirin, whereas none developed an erosion while taking enteric-coated aspirin. Mean fasting salicylate levels were similar in the two groups. It is concluded that regular aspirin causes a greater amount

Lancet1980

498. Clinical trials of intra-articular aspirin in rheumatoid arthritis.

Clinical trials of intra-articular aspirin in rheumatoid arthritis. 6107722 1981 01 29 1981 01 29 2015 06 16 0140-6736 2 8204 1980 Nov 22 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Clinical trials of intra-articular aspirin in rheumatoid arthritis. 1099-102 The effect of the intra-articular injection of acetylsalicylic acid in patients with rheumatoid arthritis was compared with that of hydrocortisone acetate and with that of saline in blind, controlled, clinical trials. All three preparations were (...) effective in relieving pain and improving the range of motion, and no significant differences were demonstrated. The results suggest a need for the re-appraisal of the value of intra-articular administration of synthetic corticosteroids. Rylance H J HJ Chalmers T M TM Elton R A RA eng Clinical Trial Comparative Study Journal Article Randomized Controlled Trial England Lancet 2985213R 0140-6736 R16CO5Y76E Aspirin WI4X0X7BPJ Hydrocortisone AIM IM Arthritis, Rheumatoid drug therapy Aspirin administration

Lancet1980

499. Reduction by aspirin of intestinal fluid-loss in acute childhood gastroenteritis.

Reduction by aspirin of intestinal fluid-loss in acute childhood gastroenteritis. 6104131 1980 08 25 1980 08 25 2015 06 16 0140-6736 1 8182 1980 Jun 21 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Reduction by aspirin of intestinal fluid-loss in acute childhood gastroenteritis. 1329-30 Soluble aspirin was given by mouth in therapeutic doses in a double-blind trial to malnourished infants and young children with gastroenteritis and dehydration. Faecal fluid-losses were reduced and weight-grain was enhanced (...) in the group given aspirin. These effects were statistically significant when compared with those obtained with a placebo preparation and in a group of patients given supportive therapy but no specific drug treatment. The results suggest that aspirin may be useful in reducing intestinal fluid-loss in childhood gastroenteritis. Before the widespread use of aspirin can be recommended, its effects in patients not under hospital supervision must be determined. Burke V V Gracey M M Suharyono Sunoto eng Clinical

Lancet1980

500. A randomized, controlled trial of aspirin in persons recovered from myocardial infarction.

A randomized, controlled trial of aspirin in persons recovered from myocardial infarction. 6985998 1980 03 24 1980 03 24 2016 10 17 0098-7484 243 7 1980 Feb 15 JAMA JAMA A randomized, controlled trial of aspirin in persons recovered from myocardial infarction. 661-9 The Aspirin Myocardial Infarction Study (AMIS) was a National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute-sponsored, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial designed to test whether the regular administration (...) of aspirin to men and women who had experienced at least one documented myocardial infarction (MI) would result in a significant reduction in total mortality over a three-year period. Cause-specific mortality, nonfatal events, and side effects were also evaluated. Over a 13-month period, 4,524 persons between the ages of 30 and 69 years were randomized to either 1 g of aspirin per day (2,267 persons) or placebo (2,257 persons). High levels of patient compliance to study protocol were indicated by various

JAMA1980