Latest & greatest articles for aspirin

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Aspirin

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) more commonly known as aspirin is a painkiller that has a wide range of uses. It is frequently used to treat fever, mild pain, tooth aches, headaches and muscle aches. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and can be used in the management of conditions such as heart attack, arthritis, blood clots and stroke. Aspirin, has been used for thousands of years, initially extracted from the leaves of willow trees.

Aspirin works in much the same way as other NSAIDs but has additional properties, such as antiplatelet activity which can make it additionally useful. More recently aspirin has been linked with cancer prevention. But the potential benefits of aspirin need to be weighed against the potential side effects, which includes gastrointestinal bleeding and Reye’s syndrome. It should be noted that aspirin should not be used in people who are allergic to drugs such as ibuprofen or a more generalized intolerance to NSAIDs. It should also be used cautiously in asthmatics and/or those with bronchospasm associated with NSAID use.

Research evidence, clinical trials and guidelines on Aspirin

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on aspirin ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for aspirin

461. CLASP: a randomised trial of low-dose aspirin for the prevention and treatment of pre-eclampsia among 9364 pregnant women. CLASP (Collaborative Low-dose Aspirin Study in Pregnancy) Collaborative Group.

CLASP: a randomised trial of low-dose aspirin for the prevention and treatment of pre-eclampsia among 9364 pregnant women. CLASP (Collaborative Low-dose Aspirin Study in Pregnancy) Collaborative Group. 7906809 1994 03 28 1994 03 28 2015 06 16 0140-6736 343 8898 1994 Mar 12 Lancet (London, England) Lancet CLASP: a randomised trial of low-dose aspirin for the prevention and treatment of pre-eclampsia among 9364 pregnant women. CLASP (Collaborative Low-dose Aspirin Study in Pregnancy (...) ) Collaborative Group. 619-29 Pre-eclampsia is a common and serious complication of pregnancy that affects both mother and child. Review of previous small trials of antiplatelet therapy, particularly low-dose aspirin, suggested reductions of about three-quarters in the incidence of pre-eclampsia and some avoidance of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), but larger trials have not confirmed these results. In our multicentre study 9364 women were randomly assigned 60 mg aspirin daily or matching placebo. 74

Lancet1994

462. Randomised trial of oral aspirin for chronic venous leg ulcers.

Randomised trial of oral aspirin for chronic venous leg ulcers. 7912767 1994 08 04 1994 08 04 2015 06 16 0140-6736 344 8916 1994 Jul 16 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Randomised trial of oral aspirin for chronic venous leg ulcers. 164-5 The effect of oral aspirin on the healing rate of chronic venous leg ulcers was compared with that of placebo in a double-blind randomised trial. 20 subjects with chronic venous leg ulcers were randomised to daily enteric-coated aspirin 300 mg or placebo (...) , and standardised compression bandaging. 4 months of treatment achieved ulcer healing in 38% of the patients receiving aspirin compared with 0% of those receiving placebo (p < 0.007). 52% of the aspirin-treated group showed significant reduction in ulcer size compared with 26% of placebo recipients (p < 0.007). Reduction in ulcer surface area was significantly better in the aspirin-treated group at 2 (p < 0.01) and 4 months (p < 0.002) compared with that in the placebo group. Layton A M AM Academic Unit

Lancet1994

463. Low-molecular weight heparin versus aspirin and dipyridamole after femoropopliteal bypass grafting.

Low-molecular weight heparin versus aspirin and dipyridamole after femoropopliteal bypass grafting. 7934346 1994 10 24 1994 10 24 2015 06 16 0140-6736 344 8927 1994 Oct 01 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Low-molecular weight heparin versus aspirin and dipyridamole after femoropopliteal bypass grafting. 914-8 Low-molecular weight heparin has theoretical advantages over aspirin and dipyridamole in maintaining vascular-graft patency by virtue of its better antithrombotic effect (...) and antiproliferative activity on vascular, smooth-muscle cells. We tested the hypothesis that low-molecular weight heparin would be more effective than aspirin and dipyridamole in maintaining graft patency in patients undergoing femoropopliteal bypass grafting. Patients were randomised to receive either a daily injection of 2500 IU low-molecular weight heparin, or 300 mg aspirin with 100 mg dipyridamole 8 hourly for 3 months. 94 patients were randomised to low-molecular weight heparin and 106 to aspirin and

Lancet1994

464. Low-dose aspirin in prevention and treatment of intrauterine growth retardation and pregnancy-induced hypertension. Italian study of aspirin in pregnancy.

Low-dose aspirin in prevention and treatment of intrauterine growth retardation and pregnancy-induced hypertension. Italian study of aspirin in pregnancy. 8094168 1993 03 11 1993 03 11 2015 06 16 0140-6736 341 8842 1993 Feb 13 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Low-dose aspirin in prevention and treatment of intrauterine growth retardation and pregnancy-induced hypertension. Italian study of aspirin in pregnancy. 396-400 Meta-analysis of data from several controlled trials has shown that low-dose (...) aspirin reduces the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) in women at high risk of these disorders. We have assessed the efficacy of low-dose aspirin in women judged to be at moderate risk. Women were included on prophylactic criteria--age under 18 or over 40 years, mild or moderate chronic hypertension (diastolic pressure between 90 and 110 mm Hg), nephropathy with normal renal function and blood pressure, history of PIH or IUGR, and twin pregnancy

Lancet1993

465. Prevention of preeclampsia with low-dose aspirin in healthy, nulliparous pregnant women. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Network of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units.

Prevention of preeclampsia with low-dose aspirin in healthy, nulliparous pregnant women. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Network of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units. 8413387 1993 10 26 1993 10 26 2013 11 21 0028-4793 329 17 1993 Oct 21 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Prevention of preeclampsia with low-dose aspirin in healthy, nulliparous pregnant women. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Network of Maternal-Fetal Medicine (...) Units. 1213-8 Although low-dose aspirin has been reported to reduce the incidence of preeclampsia among women at high risk for this complication, its efficacy and safety in healthy, nulliparous pregnant women are not known. We studied 3135 normotensive nulliparous women who were 13 to 26 weeks pregnant to determine whether treatment with aspirin reduced the incidence of preeclampsia. Of this group, 1570 women received 60 mg of aspirin per day and 1565 received placebo for the remainder

NEJM1993

466. A comparison of aspirin with placebo in patients treated with warfarin after heart-valve replacement.

A comparison of aspirin with placebo in patients treated with warfarin after heart-valve replacement. 8336751 1993 08 26 1993 08 26 2013 11 21 0028-4793 329 8 1993 Aug 19 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. A comparison of aspirin with placebo in patients treated with warfarin after heart-valve replacement. 524-9 Despite the use of warfarin, major systemic embolism remains an important complication in patients with heart-valve replacement. Although the addition of antiplatelet (...) agents has the potential to reduce this complication, their efficacy and safety when given in combination with warfarin are uncertain. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we assessed the efficacy and safety of adding aspirin (100 mg per day) to warfarin treatment (target international normalized ratio, 3.0 to 4.5) in 370 patients with mechanical heart valves or with tissue valves plus atrial fibrillation or a history of thromboembolism. A total of 186 patients were randomly

NEJM1993

467. Prevention of one-year vein-graft occlusion after aortocoronary-bypass surgery: a comparison of low-dose aspirin, low-dose aspirin plus dipyridamole, and oral anticoagulants. The CABADAS Research Group of the Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of The Ne

Prevention of one-year vein-graft occlusion after aortocoronary-bypass surgery: a comparison of low-dose aspirin, low-dose aspirin plus dipyridamole, and oral anticoagulants. The CABADAS Research Group of the Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of The Ne 8101300 1993 08 17 1993 08 17 2015 06 16 0140-6736 342 8866 1993 Jul 31 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Prevention of one-year vein-graft occlusion after aortocoronary-bypass surgery: a comparison of low-dose aspirin, low-dose aspirin plus (...) dipyridamole, and oral anticoagulants. The CABADAS Research Group of the Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of The Netherlands. 257-64 Aspirin, alone or in combination with dipyridamole, is known to prevent occlusion of aortocoronary vein grafts. The benefit of dipyridamole in addition to aspirin remains controversial, and the efficacy and safety of oral anticoagulants for prevention of vein-graft occlusion have not been established. We assessed one-year angiographic vein-graft patency after

Lancet1993

468. Effect of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on colorectal adenomas: case-control study of subjects participating in the Nottingham faecal occult blood screening programme.

Effect of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on colorectal adenomas: case-control study of subjects participating in the Nottingham faecal occult blood screening programme. 8374373 1993 10 15 1993 10 15 2013 11 21 0959-8138 307 6899 1993 Jul 31 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Effect of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on colorectal adenomas: case-control study of subjects participating in the Nottingham faecal occult blood screening programme. 285-9 To examine (...) the relation between the use of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the presence of asymptomatic colorectal adenomas. Case-control study of subjects participating in a randomised controlled trial of faecal occult blood screening for colorectal cancer. Data on analgesics and other drugs were obtained from a questionnaire which was mainly concerned with diet and was administered by an interviewer. Nottingham. 147 patients with positive results in faecal occult blood tests who were found

BMJ1993 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

469. Aspirin effects on mortality and morbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus. Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study report 14. ETDRS Investigators.

Aspirin effects on mortality and morbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus. Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study report 14. ETDRS Investigators. 1507375 1992 09 22 1992 09 22 2016 10 17 0098-7484 268 10 1992 Sep 09 JAMA JAMA Aspirin effects on mortality and morbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus. Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study report 14. ETDRS Investigators. 1292-300 This report presents information on the effects of aspirin on mortality, the occurrence (...) of cardiovascular events, and the incidence of kidney disease in the patients enrolled in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS). This multicenter, randomized clinical trial of aspirin vs placebo was sponsored by the National Eye Institute. Patients (N = 3711) were enrolled in 22 clinical centers between April 1980 and July 1985. Men and women between the ages of 18 and 70 years with a clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus were eligible. Approximately 30% of all patients were considered

JAMA1992

470. Low-dose aspirin and subsequent peripheral arterial surgery in the Physicians' Health Study.

Low-dose aspirin and subsequent peripheral arterial surgery in the Physicians' Health Study. 1352567 1992 08 13 1992 08 13 2015 06 16 0140-6736 340 8812 1992 Jul 18 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Low-dose aspirin and subsequent peripheral arterial surgery in the Physicians' Health Study. 143-5 In the US Physicians' Health Study the early termination of the aspirin arm has provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that low-dose aspirin (325 mg on alternate days) might affect (...) the subsequent occurrence of peripheral arterial surgery. In the study, a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial among 22,071 healthy US male physicians aged 40-84, there were, during an average of 60.2 months of treatment and follow-up, 56 participants who underwent peripheral arterial surgery (20 aspirin, 36 placebo). The relative risk of peripheral artery surgery in the aspirin group was 0.54 (95% confidence intervals 0.30-0.95; p = 0.03). These data indicate that chronic administration of low

Lancet1992

471. Prevention of serious cardiac events by low-dose aspirin in patients with silent myocardial ischaemia. The Research Group on Instability in Coronary Artery Disease in Southeast Sweden.

Prevention of serious cardiac events by low-dose aspirin in patients with silent myocardial ischaemia. The Research Group on Instability in Coronary Artery Disease in Southeast Sweden. 1354274 1992 09 17 1992 09 17 2015 06 16 0140-6736 340 8818 1992 Aug 29 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Prevention of serious cardiac events by low-dose aspirin in patients with silent myocardial ischaemia. The Research Group on Instability in Coronary Artery Disease in Southeast Sweden. 497-501 On exercise (...) testing after an episode of unstable coronary artery disease (CAD; unstable angina or non-Q-wave myocardial infarction), a proportion of patients show ST-segment depression, indicating myocardial ischaemia, but do not report concomitant symptoms of angina. Treatment of such "silent" ischaemia aims mainly to reduce the risk of subsequent cardiac events. We have studied the effect of low-dose aspirin in patients with myocardial ischaemia defined at the predischarge test as silent (though patients might

Lancet1992

472. Double-blind trial of aspirin in primary prevention of myocardial infarction in patients with stable chronic angina pectoris. The Swedish Angina Pectoris Aspirin Trial (SAPAT) Group.

Double-blind trial of aspirin in primary prevention of myocardial infarction in patients with stable chronic angina pectoris. The Swedish Angina Pectoris Aspirin Trial (SAPAT) Group. 1360557 1993 01 07 1993 01 07 2015 06 16 0140-6736 340 8833 1992 Dec 12 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Double-blind trial of aspirin in primary prevention of myocardial infarction in patients with stable chronic angina pectoris. The Swedish Angina Pectoris Aspirin Trial (SAPAT) Group. 1421-5 Clinical trials have (...) demonstrated a prophylactic role for aspirin in myocardial infarction and in unstable angina pectoris. The Swedish Angina Pectoris Aspirin Trial (SAPAT) is the first prospective study of aspirin in stable angina. 2035 patients were randomised double-blind to treatment with aspirin 75 mg daily or placebo. All patients were treated with sotalol for control of symptoms. The median duration of follow-up was 50 months. Compared with the placebo+sotalol group, the aspirin+sotalol group had a 34% (81 vs 124

Lancet1992

473. ISIS-3: a randomised comparison of streptokinase vs tissue plasminogen activator vs anistreplase and of aspirin plus heparin vs aspirin alone among 41,299 cases of suspected acute myocardial infarction. ISIS-3 (Third International Study of Infarct Surviva

ISIS-3: a randomised comparison of streptokinase vs tissue plasminogen activator vs anistreplase and of aspirin plus heparin vs aspirin alone among 41,299 cases of suspected acute myocardial infarction. ISIS-3 (Third International Study of Infarct Surviva 1347801 1992 04 17 1992 04 17 2015 06 16 0140-6736 339 8796 1992 Mar 28 Lancet (London, England) Lancet ISIS-3: a randomised comparison of streptokinase vs tissue plasminogen activator vs anistreplase and of aspirin plus heparin vs aspirin (...) ), anistreplase: 30 U over about 3 min). All patients were to receive aspirin (162 mg/day enteric-coated), with the first tablet chewed for rapid and full antiplatelet effect. Half of all patients were randomly allocated subcutaneous calcium heparin (12,500 IU starting at 4 h and given twice daily for 7 days or until prior discharge) in addition to aspirin, and the other half were to receive aspirin alone. ASPIRIN PLUS HEPARIN VERSUS ASPIRIN ALONE--The addition of heparin to aspirin was associated

Lancet1992

474. Swedish Aspirin Low-Dose Trial (SALT) of 75 mg aspirin as secondary prophylaxis after cerebrovascular ischaemic events. The SALT Collaborative Group.

Swedish Aspirin Low-Dose Trial (SALT) of 75 mg aspirin as secondary prophylaxis after cerebrovascular ischaemic events. The SALT Collaborative Group. 1682734 1991 12 24 1991 12 24 2015 06 16 0140-6736 338 8779 1991 Nov 30 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Swedish Aspirin Low-Dose Trial (SALT) of 75 mg aspirin as secondary prophylaxis after cerebrovascular ischaemic events. The SALT Collaborative Group. 1345-9 The efficacy of aspirin in daily doses of 300 mg and more as secondary prophylaxis after (...) cerebrovascular events is well established. Since much lower doses of aspirin can inhibit platelet function, and carry a lower risk of adverse effects, the Swedish Aspirin Low-dose Trial (SALT) was set up to study the efficacy of 75 mg aspirin daily in prevention of stroke and death after transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke. 1360 patients entered the study 1-4 months after the qualifying event: 676 were randomly assigned to aspirin treatment and 684 to placebo treatment. The median duration

Lancet1991

475. Prevention of fetal growth retardation with low-dose aspirin: findings of the EPREDA trial.

Prevention of fetal growth retardation with low-dose aspirin: findings of the EPREDA trial. 1675315 1991 07 17 1991 07 17 2015 06 16 0140-6736 337 8755 1991 Jun 15 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Prevention of fetal growth retardation with low-dose aspirin: findings of the EPREDA trial. 1427-31 The efficacy of low-dose aspirin in preventing fetal growth retardation was tested in a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. A secondary aim was to find out whether dipyridamole improves (...) the efficacy of aspirin. 323 women at 15-18 weeks' amenorrhoea were selected at twenty-five participating centres on the basis of fetal growth retardation and/or fetal death or abruptio placentae in at least one previous pregnancy. They were randomly allocated to groups receiving placebo, 150 mg/day aspirin, or 150 mg/day aspirin plus 225 mg/day dipyridamole, for the remainder of the pregnancy. In the first phase of the trial all actively treated patients (n = 156) were compared with the placebo group (n

Lancet1991

476. Suppression of thromboxane A2 but not of systemic prostacyclin by controlled-release aspirin.

Suppression of thromboxane A2 but not of systemic prostacyclin by controlled-release aspirin. 1891022 1991 10 16 1991 10 16 2013 11 21 0028-4793 325 16 1991 Oct 17 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Suppression of thromboxane A2 but not of systemic prostacyclin by controlled-release aspirin. 1137-41 The antithrombotic efficacy of aspirin is attributed to its inhibition of the enzyme prostaglandin G/H synthase, which is necessary for the formation of thromboxane A2 in platelets (...) . Thromboxane A2 is a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet agonist. However, the formation of prostacyclin by vascular endothelium also requires prostaglandin G/H synthase, and prostacyclin exerts opposite effects on platelet function and vascular tone. We wanted to see whether controlled-release aspirin would affect the formation of thromboxane A2 but not prostacyclin by reducing the aspirin concentration that reaches the posthepatic circulation. A controlled-release formulation containing 75 mg of aspirin

NEJM1991

477. A comparison of two doses of aspirin (30 mg vs. 283 mg a day) in patients after a transient ischemic attack or minor ischemic stroke. The Dutch TIA Trial Study Group.

A comparison of two doses of aspirin (30 mg vs. 283 mg a day) in patients after a transient ischemic attack or minor ischemic stroke. The Dutch TIA Trial Study Group. 1922220 1991 11 05 1991 11 05 2013 11 21 0028-4793 325 18 1991 Oct 31 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. A comparison of two doses of aspirin (30 mg vs. 283 mg a day) in patients after a transient ischemic attack or minor ischemic stroke. The Dutch TIA Trial Study Group. 1261-6 Aspirin is known to improve (...) the outcome of patients who have had a cerebral transient ischemic attack, but the optimal dose of aspirin remains uncertain. Experimental evidence indicates that 30 mg of aspirin daily alters platelet aggregation more favorably than the 300-mg dose currently used in patients after transient ischemic attack or minor ischemic stroke. We assessed the effects of two doses of a water-soluble preparation of acetylsalicylic acid, or aspirin (30 mg vs. 283 mg a day), on the occurrence of death from all vascular

NEJM1991

478. Doppler ultrasound and aspirin in recognition and prevention of pregnancy-induced hypertension.

Doppler ultrasound and aspirin in recognition and prevention of pregnancy-induced hypertension. 1972487 1990 07 26 1990 07 26 2015 06 16 0140-6736 335 8705 1990 Jun 30 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Doppler ultrasound and aspirin in recognition and prevention of pregnancy-induced hypertension. 1552-5 Screening of 1226 nulliparous women by means of doppler uteroplacental flow-velocity waveforms in early pregnancy identified 148 (12%) as being at high risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension (...) . After exclusions and refusals, 100 women were randomly allocated to groups receiving either low-dose aspirin (75 mg daily; 48 patients) or identical placebo (52 patients) for the remainder of the pregnancy. The difference between the aspirin and placebo groups in the frequency of pregnancy-induced hypertension (13% vs 25%) did not achieve significance, but there were significant differences in the frequencies of proteinuric hypertension (2% vs 19%) and hypertension occurring before 37 weeks

Lancet1990

479. Trial of iloprost versus aspirin treatment for critical limb ischaemia of thromboangiitis obliterans. The TAO Study.

Trial of iloprost versus aspirin treatment for critical limb ischaemia of thromboangiitis obliterans. The TAO Study. 1689791 1990 04 12 1990 04 12 2015 06 16 0140-6736 335 8689 1990 Mar 10 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Trial of iloprost versus aspirin treatment for critical limb ischaemia of thromboangiitis obliterans. The TAO Study. 555-7 152 patients with thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease) and pain from critical leg ischaemia were randomly allocated to receive iloprost (...) , a chemically stable prostacyclin analogue, or low-dose aspirin, for 28 days in a double-blind trial. On review, 19 patients did not fulfil the stringent entry criteria. Of the other 133 patients, 98 also had leg ulcers. After 21-28 days, 58 (85%) of 68 iloprost-treated patients showed ulcer healing or relief of ischaemic pain, compared with 11 (17%) of 65 in the aspirin-treated group. 43 (63%) on iloprost treatment had complete relief of pain, compared with 18 (28%) on aspirin. Ulcers healed completely

Lancet1990

480. Effect of heparin, aspirin, or alteplase in reduction of myocardial ischaemia in refractory unstable angina.

Effect of heparin, aspirin, or alteplase in reduction of myocardial ischaemia in refractory unstable angina. 1969013 1990 04 16 1990 04 16 2015 06 16 0140-6736 335 8690 1990 Mar 17 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Effect of heparin, aspirin, or alteplase in reduction of myocardial ischaemia in refractory unstable angina. 615-8 399 out of 474 inpatients with unstable angina were monitored for 48 h and 97 of these were found to be refractory to conventional antianginal treatments and entered (...) a randomised double-blind study. With the initial protocol heparin infusion or bolus were compared with aspirin; with a modified protocol, heparin infusion, the best of these three treatments, was compared with alteplase. Patients were monitored for 3 days after starting treatment and then observed clinically for 4 more days. On the first days of treatment heparin infusion significantly decreased the frequency of angina (by 84-94%), episodes of silent ischaemia (by 71-77%), and the overall duration

Lancet1990