Latest & greatest articles for aspirin

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on aspirin or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on aspirin and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Aspirin

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) more commonly known as aspirin is a painkiller that has a wide range of uses. It is frequently used to treat fever, mild pain, tooth aches, headaches and muscle aches. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and can be used in the management of conditions such as heart attack, arthritis, blood clots and stroke. Aspirin, has been used for thousands of years, initially extracted from the leaves of willow trees.

Aspirin works in much the same way as other NSAIDs but has additional properties, such as antiplatelet activity which can make it additionally useful. More recently aspirin has been linked with cancer prevention. But the potential benefits of aspirin need to be weighed against the potential side effects, which includes gastrointestinal bleeding and Reye’s syndrome. It should be noted that aspirin should not be used in people who are allergic to drugs such as ibuprofen or a more generalized intolerance to NSAIDs. It should also be used cautiously in asthmatics and/or those with bronchospasm associated with NSAID use.

Research evidence, clinical trials and guidelines on Aspirin

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on aspirin ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for aspirin

261. Dipyridamole plus aspirin versus aspirin alone in secondary prevention after TIA or stroke: a meta-analysis by risk

Dipyridamole plus aspirin versus aspirin alone in secondary prevention after TIA or stroke: a meta-analysis by risk Dipyridamole plus aspirin versus aspirin alone in secondary prevention after TIA or stroke: a meta-analysis by risk Dipyridamole plus aspirin versus aspirin alone in secondary prevention after TIA or stroke: a meta-analysis by risk Halkes PH, Gray L J, Bath PM, Diener HC, Guiraud-Chaumeil B, Yatsu FM, Algra A CRD summary This individual patient data review concluded (...) that combination therapy with dipyridamole plus aspirin reduced vascular death/stroke and other vascular events when compared with aspirin alone in patients after a transient ischaemic attack or stroke. There is some uncertainty regarding this conclusion given potential biases and assumptions within the review. Authors' objectives To determine the efficacy of combination therapy with dipyridamole plus aspirin compared with aspirin alone for the secondary prevention of stroke in patients after transient

DARE.2008

262. Major malformations after first-trimester exposure to aspirin and NSAIDs

Major malformations after first-trimester exposure to aspirin and NSAIDs Major malformations after first-trimester exposure to aspirin and NSAIDs Major malformations after first-trimester exposure to aspirin and NSAIDs Nakhai-Pour HR, Berard A CRD summary The authors concluded that exposure to aspirin or NSAIDs during the first trimester of pregnancy was associated with the risk of gastroschisis (aspirin), cardiac malformations (NSAIDs) and orofacial malformations (naproxen). The authors (...) ' conclusion reflected the evidence presented. However, due to a lack of validity assessment and reliance upon observational studies, the reliability of the authors conclusions is unclear. Authors' objectives To determine if there is an association between aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and the risk of congenital malformations Searching MEDLINE (1966-2008), EMBASE (1980-2008), EBM reviews, DARE and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched for studies in any

DARE.2008

263. The effect of pre-operative aspirin on bleeding, transfusion, myocardial infarction, and mortality in coronary artery bypass surgery: a systematic review of randomized and observational studies

The effect of pre-operative aspirin on bleeding, transfusion, myocardial infarction, and mortality in coronary artery bypass surgery: a systematic review of randomized and observational studies The effect of pre-operative aspirin on bleeding, transfusion, myocardial infarction, and mortality in coronary artery bypass surgery: a systematic review of randomized and observational studies The effect of pre-operative aspirin on bleeding, transfusion, myocardial infarction, and mortality in coronary (...) artery bypass surgery: a systematic review of randomized and observational studies Sun J C J, Whitlock R, Cheng J, Eikelboom J W, Thabane L, Crowther M A, Teoh K H CRD summary The authors concluded that pre-operative aspirin increased bleeding after coronary artery bypass grafting; doses under 325 mg/day may prevent this increase. Most studies were old and further research was required in current practice settings. This was generally a well-conducted and clearly reported review. The authors’ conclusions

DARE.2008

264. Use of the PFA-100 closure time to predict cardiovascular events in aspirin-treated cardiovascular patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Use of the PFA-100 closure time to predict cardiovascular events in aspirin-treated cardiovascular patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis Use of the PFA-100 closure time to predict cardiovascular events in aspirin-treated cardiovascular patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis Use of the PFA-100 closure time to predict cardiovascular events in aspirin-treated cardiovascular patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis Reny JL, De Moerloose P, Dauzat M, Fontana P CRD summary (...) This review concluded that a short closure time was associated with increased recurrence of ischaemic events in aspirin-treated cardiovascular patients. Given the lack of a thorough quality assessment, apparent limitations of the included studies, presence of publication bias, clinical heterogeneity between studies and the generalisation to patients with cardiovascular disease, the conclusions should be treated with some caution. Authors' objectives To evaluate the predictive value of platelet function

DARE.2008

265. Evidence of absence or absence of evidence: a reanalysis of the effects of low-dose aspirin in in vitro fertilization

Evidence of absence or absence of evidence: a reanalysis of the effects of low-dose aspirin in in vitro fertilization Evidence of absence or absence of evidence: a reanalysis of the effects of low-dose aspirin in in vitro fertilization Evidence of absence or absence of evidence: a reanalysis of the effects of low-dose aspirin in in vitro fertilization Ruopp MD, Collins TC, Whitcomb BW, Schisterman EF CRD summary The authors concluded that low-dose aspirin during in vitro fertilisation may (...) increase clinical pregnancy rates but that more research is required; there was no reason to discontinue aspirin use. Evidence appeared to support the authors’ conclusions, but incomplete reporting of review methods and lack of assessment of study quality make it difficult to comment on their reliability. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effects of low-dose aspirin during in vitro fertilisation and compare findings with those of a previous meta-analysis. Searching MEDLINE, Web of Science, EMBASE

DARE.2008

266. Aspirin use and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis and meta-regression of observational studies from 2001 to 2005

Aspirin use and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis and meta-regression of observational studies from 2001 to 2005 Aspirin use and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis and meta-regression of observational studies from 2001 to 2005 Aspirin use and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis and meta-regression of observational studies from 2001 to 2005 Mangiapane S, Blettner M, Schlattmann P CRD summary The authors concluded that aspirin may be associated with a reduced breast cancer risk (...) , but that this conclusion should be interpreted carefully. Results from a very large relatively long-term randomised controlled trial appeared to differ from authors' interpretation of the current evidence, which combined with some methodological flaws in the review mean that the conclusions should be interpreted with caution. Authors' objectives To determine the association between aspirin and breast cancer and examine reasons for differences between studies using evidence from recent epidemiological studies

DARE.2008

267. Aspirin plus dipyridamole versus aspirin for prevention of vascular events after stroke or TIA: a meta-analysis

Aspirin plus dipyridamole versus aspirin for prevention of vascular events after stroke or TIA: a meta-analysis Aspirin plus dipyridamole versus aspirin for prevention of vascular events after stroke or TIA: a meta-analysis Aspirin plus dipyridamole versus aspirin for prevention of vascular events after stroke or TIA: a meta-analysis Verro P, Gorelick PB, Nguyen D CRD summary This review concluded that aspirin with dipyridamole was more effective than aspirin alone for preventing stroke and (...) other vascular events in patients with minor stroke and ischaemic attacks; risk reduction was significant increased for trials primarily using extended-release dipyridamole. The authors' conclusions reflected the results of the review and are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy of aspirin plus dipyridamole compared with aspirin alone for preventing recurrent cerebral and systemic vascular events in patients with minor stroke and ischaemic attacks. Searching MEDLINE

DARE.2008

268. Risks and benefits of oral anticoagulation compared with clopidogrel plus aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation according to stroke risk: the atrial fibrillation clopidogrel trial with irbesartan for prevention of vascular events (ACTIVE-W)

Risks and benefits of oral anticoagulation compared with clopidogrel plus aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation according to stroke risk: the atrial fibrillation clopidogrel trial with irbesartan for prevention of vascular events (ACTIVE-W) 18323500 2008 04 29 2008 05 29 2016 11 24 1524-4628 39 5 2008 May Stroke Stroke Risks and benefits of oral anticoagulation compared with clopidogrel plus aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation according to stroke risk: the atrial fibrillation (...) clopidogrel trial with irbesartan for prevention of vascular events (ACTIVE-W). 1482-6 10.1161/STROKEAHA.107.500199 In ACTIVE-W, oral anticoagulation (OAC) was more efficacious than combined clopidogrel plus aspirin (C+A) in preventing vascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, because OAC carries important bleeding complications, risk stratification schemes have been devised to identify patients for whom the absolute benefits of OAC exceed its risks. Participants were risk-stratified

EvidenceUpdates2008

269. The effect of pre-operative aspirin on bleeding, transfusion, myocardial infarction, and mortality in coronary artery bypass surgery: a systematic review of randomized and observational studies

The effect of pre-operative aspirin on bleeding, transfusion, myocardial infarction, and mortality in coronary artery bypass surgery: a systematic review of randomized and observational studies 18346962 2008 04 15 2008 08 28 2013 11 21 0195-668X 29 8 2008 Apr European heart journal Eur. Heart J. The effect of pre-operative aspirin on bleeding, transfusion, myocardial infarction, and mortality in coronary artery bypass surgery: a systematic review of randomized and observational studies. 1057-71 (...) 10.1093/eurheartj/ehn104 To obtain estimates of the efficacy and safety of pre-operative aspirin in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Eligible studies included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies of patients undergoing CABG, comparing pre-operative aspirin with no aspirin/placebo, and reporting at least one of our primary outcomes. In eight RCTs (n = 805), pre-operative aspirin increased post-operative bleeding [Mean difference (MD), 104.9 mL; 95

EvidenceUpdates2008

270. Low dose aspirin and cognitive function in middle aged to elderly adults: randomised controlled trial.

Low dose aspirin and cognitive function in middle aged to elderly adults: randomised controlled trial. 18762476 2008 09 02 2008 09 15 2017 02 20 1756-1833 337 2008 Sep 01 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Low dose aspirin and cognitive function in middle aged to elderly adults: randomised controlled trial. a1198 10.1136/bmj.a1198 337/sep01_1/a1198 To determine the effects of low dose aspirin on cognitive function in middle aged to elderly men and women at moderately increased cardiovascular risk (...) . Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial. Central Scotland. 3350 men and women aged over 50 participating in the aspirin for asymptomatic atherosclerosis trial. Low dose aspirin (100 mg daily) or placebo for five years. Tests of memory, executive function, non-verbal reasoning, mental flexibility, and information processing five years after randomisation, with scores used to create a summary cognitive score (general factor). At baseline, mean vocabulary scores (an indicator of previous cognitive

BMJ2008 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

271. Aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel for recurrent stroke.

Aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel for recurrent stroke. 18753638 2008 09 18 2008 09 24 2016 12 15 1533-4406 359 12 2008 Sep 18 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel for recurrent stroke. 1238-51 10.1056/NEJMoa0805002 Recurrent stroke is a frequent, disabling event after ischemic stroke. This study compared the efficacy and safety of two antiplatelet regimens--aspirin plus extended-release (...) dipyridamole (ASA-ERDP) versus clopidogrel. In this double-blind, 2-by-2 factorial trial, we randomly assigned patients to receive 25 mg of aspirin plus 200 mg of extended-release dipyridamole twice daily or to receive 75 mg of clopidogrel daily. The primary outcome was first recurrence of stroke. The secondary outcome was a composite of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death from vascular causes. Sequential statistical testing of noninferiority (margin of 1.075), followed by superiority testing

NEJM2008 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

272. The prevention of progression of arterial disease and diabetes (POPADAD) trial: factorial randomised placebo controlled trial of aspirin and antioxidants in patients with diabetes and asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease.

The prevention of progression of arterial disease and diabetes (POPADAD) trial: factorial randomised placebo controlled trial of aspirin and antioxidants in patients with diabetes and asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease. 18927173 2008 10 17 2008 10 29 2016 10 19 1756-1833 337 2008 Oct 16 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ The prevention of progression of arterial disease and diabetes (POPADAD) trial: factorial randomised placebo controlled trial of aspirin and antioxidants in patients (...) with diabetes and asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease. a1840 10.1136/bmj.a1840 337/oct16_2/a1840 To determine whether aspirin and antioxidant therapy, combined or alone, are more effective than placebo in reducing the development of cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus and asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease. Multicentre, randomised, double blind, 2x2 factorial, placebo controlled trial. 16 hospital centres in Scotland, supported by 188 primary care groups. 1276 adults aged 40

BMJ2008 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

273. Effect of aspirin or resistant starch on colorectal neoplasia in the Lynch syndrome.

Effect of aspirin or resistant starch on colorectal neoplasia in the Lynch syndrome. 19073976 2008 12 16 2008 12 22 2016 11 22 1533-4406 359 24 2008 Dec 11 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Effect of aspirin or resistant starch on colorectal neoplasia in the Lynch syndrome. 2567-78 10.1056/NEJMoa0801297 Observational and epidemiologic data indicate that the use of aspirin reduces the risk of colorectal neoplasia; however, the effects of aspirin in the Lynch syndrome (...) (hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer) are not known. Resistant starch has been associated with an antineoplastic effect on the colon. In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, we used a two-by-two design to investigate the effects of aspirin, at a dose of 600 mg per day, and resistant starch (Novelose), at a dose of 30 g per day, in reducing the risk of adenoma and carcinoma among persons with the Lynch syndrome. Among 1071 persons in 43 centers, 62 were ineligible to participate in the study, 72 did

NEJM2008

274. Low-dose aspirin for primary prevention of atherosclerotic events in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.

Low-dose aspirin for primary prevention of atherosclerotic events in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial. 18997198 2008 11 12 2008 11 18 2016 10 17 1538-3598 300 18 2008 Nov 12 JAMA JAMA Low-dose aspirin for primary prevention of atherosclerotic events in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial. 2134-41 10.1001/jama.2008.623 Previous trials have investigated the effects of low-dose aspirin on primary prevention of cardiovascular events (...) , but not in patients with type 2 diabetes. To examine the efficacy of low-dose aspirin for the primary prevention of atherosclerotic events in patients with type 2 diabetes. Multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded, end-point trial conducted from December 2002 through April 2008 at 163 institutions throughout Japan, which enrolled 2539 patients with type 2 diabetes without a history of atherosclerotic disease and had a median follow-up of 4.37 years. Patients were assigned to the low-dose aspirin

JAMA2008

275. Are COX-2 inhibitors preferable to non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with risk of cardiovascular events taking low-dose aspirin?

Are COX-2 inhibitors preferable to non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with risk of cardiovascular events taking low-dose aspirin? Cyclo-oxygenase-2 selective inhibitors and non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with increased risk of acute cardiovascular events. Only aspirin offers primary and secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis, but trials have not answered directly whether low-dose aspirin is cardioprotective with COX-2 (...) inhibitors. A large inception cohort study showed that concomitant use of aspirin reduced risk of cardiovascular events when given with rofecoxib, celecoxib, sulindac, meloxicam, and indometacin but not when given with ibuprofen. In large trials assessing gastrointestinal safety, there were fewer gastrointestinal events in patients using both COX-2 inhibitors and aspirin than in those using non-selective NSAIDs and aspirin; significantly fewer uncomplicated upper gastrointestinal events took place

Lancet2007

276. After CABG surgery does enteric-coated aspirin result in a lower incidence of gastrointestinal complications compared to normal aspirin?

After CABG surgery does enteric-coated aspirin result in a lower incidence of gastrointestinal complications compared to normal aspirin? BestBets: After CABG surgery does enteric-coated aspirin result in a lower incidence of gastrointestinal complications compared to normal aspirin? After CABG surgery does enteric-coated aspirin result in a lower incidence of gastrointestinal complications compared to normal aspirin? Report By: Jay Walker, James Robinson, Jamie Stewart, and Samuel Jacob (...) - Specialist Registrars in Cardiothoracic Surgery Search checked by Joel Dunning - Specialist Registrar in Cardiothoracic Surgery RCS Institution: Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough and Aberdeen Royal Infirmary Date Submitted: 24th July 2007 Date Completed: 29th October 2007 Last Modified: 29th October 2007 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [patients post CABG] [EC aspirin vs aspirin] [lower incidence of gastrointestinal complications] Clinical

BestBETS2007

277. Does clopidogrel rather than aspirin plus a proton-pump inhibitor reduce the frequency of gastrointestinal complications after cardiac surgery?

Does clopidogrel rather than aspirin plus a proton-pump inhibitor reduce the frequency of gastrointestinal complications after cardiac surgery? BestBets: Does clopidogrel rather than aspirin plus a proton-pump inhibitor reduce the frequency of gastrointestinal complications after cardiac surgery? Does clopidogrel rather than aspirin plus a proton-pump inhibitor reduce the frequency of gastrointestinal complications after cardiac surgery? Report By: Maren Ziegelin, Andreas Hoschtitzky, Joel (...) to aspirin and a proton-pump inhibitor] for the prevention of [gastrointestinal bleeding or complications or peptic ulcers]? Clinical Scenario You are seeing a 72 year old man 8 days post-CABG. He had some melaena on day 2 and endoscopy showed a duodenal ulcer, which was injected. He has had no more symptoms or signs of continued bleeding and you would like to resume anti-platelet therapy. You have heard that clopidogrel is better for your stomach and decide to restart this instead of aspirin, but later

BestBETS2007

278. Low-dose aspirin for in vitro fertilisation.

Low-dose aspirin for in vitro fertilisation. BACKGROUND: Low-dose aspirin is sometimes used to improve the outcome in women undergoing in vitro fertilisation, despite inconsistent evidence of efficacy and the potential risk of significant side affects. The most appropriate time to commence aspirin therapy and length of treatment required is also still to be determined. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness of low-dose aspirin for improving the outcome of in vitro fertilisation (...) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment cycles. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (April 2007), MEDLINE (1966 to March 2007) and EMBASE (1980 to March 2007) databases using the following research terms: "(aspirin OR acetylsalicylic acid) AND (in-vitro fertilisation OR intracytoplasmic sperm injection)" combined with the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group's search strategy for identifying

Cochrane2007

279. WITHDRAWN: Analgesia and non-aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for osteoarthritis of the hip.

WITHDRAWN: Analgesia and non-aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for osteoarthritis of the hip. BACKGROUND: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been widely used as a pharmacologic treatment to relieve pain for patients with OA of the hip. However, these agents are associated with significant toxicity, particularly in the elderly population (age > 65 years). OBJECTIVES: To review all randomized trials of analgesics and anti-inflammatory therapy in osteoarthritis (OA

Cochrane2007

280. WITHDRAWN: Non-aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for treating osteoarthritis of the knee.

WITHDRAWN: Non-aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for treating osteoarthritis of the knee. BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis(OA) is the most common rheumatic disease. Simple analgesics are now accepted as the appropriate first line pharmacological treatment of uncomplicated OA. Non-aspirin NSAIDs are licensed for the relief of pain and inflammation arising from rheumatic disease. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether there is a difference in the relative efficacy of individual non-steroidal (...) anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) when used in the management of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched Medline (1966-1995) and Bids Embase (Jan-Dec, 1980-1995). The searches were limited to publications in the English language, and were last performed in November 1996. We used modified Cochrane Collaboration search strategy to identify all randomised controlled trials. The MeSH heading "osteoarthritis" was combined with the generic names of the 17 non-aspirin NSAIDs licensed

Cochrane2007