Latest & greatest articles for aspirin

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on aspirin or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on aspirin and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Aspirin

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) more commonly known as aspirin is a painkiller that has a wide range of uses. It is frequently used to treat fever, mild pain, tooth aches, headaches and muscle aches. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and can be used in the management of conditions such as heart attack, arthritis, blood clots and stroke. Aspirin, has been used for thousands of years, initially extracted from the leaves of willow trees.

Aspirin works in much the same way as other NSAIDs but has additional properties, such as antiplatelet activity which can make it additionally useful. More recently aspirin has been linked with cancer prevention. But the potential benefits of aspirin need to be weighed against the potential side effects, which includes gastrointestinal bleeding and Reye’s syndrome. It should be noted that aspirin should not be used in people who are allergic to drugs such as ibuprofen or a more generalized intolerance to NSAIDs. It should also be used cautiously in asthmatics and/or those with bronchospasm associated with NSAID use.

Research evidence, clinical trials and guidelines on Aspirin

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on aspirin ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for aspirin

241. Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing patients with and without diabetes

Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing patients with and without diabetes Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing patients with and without diabetes Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing patients with and without diabetes Calvin AD, Aggarwal NR, Hassan Murad M, Shi Q, Elamin MB, Geske JB (...) , Fernandez-Balsells MM, Albuquerque FN, Lampropulos JF, Erwin PJ, Smith SA, Montori VM CRD summary This review aimed to determine whether the effect of aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular events and mortality differed for patients with and without diabetes. It concluded that available evidence was insufficient to conclusively show a benefit of aspirin therapy in patients with diabetes; the relative benefit may be similar to that in patients without diabetes. These conclusions appear appropriately

DARE.2009

242. The effect of aspirin in the recurrence of colorectal adenomas: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

The effect of aspirin in the recurrence of colorectal adenomas: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials The effect of aspirin in the recurrence of colorectal adenomas: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials The effect of aspirin in the recurrence of colorectal adenomas: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Gao F, Liao C, Liu L, Tan A, Cao Y, Mo Z CRD summary The review found that aspirin use reduces the risk of recurrent adenomas in patients with a history (...) of colorectal adenomas. The authors' conclusions reflected the evidence base, but the reliability of the conclusions is not clear due to potential bias in the review process and a limited evidence base. Authors' objectives To assess the effect of aspirin use in the prevention of the recurrence of colorectal adenomas. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched from inception to July 2008 without language restrictions; limited search terms were

DARE.2009

243. Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in people with diabetes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in people with diabetes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in people with diabetes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in people with diabetes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials De Berardis G, Sacco M, Strippoli GF, Pellegrini F, Graziano G, Tognoni G, Nicolucci A CRD summary This review (...) concluded that a clear benefit of aspirin in the primary prevention of major cardiovascular events in people with diabetes was not proven. The pooled results should be viewed with caution; they were from studies with varied populations and aspirin regimens and might not represent the entire evidence base. Given the evidence presented, the conclusion seems to be appropriate. Authors' objectives To evaluate the benefits and disadvantages of low dose aspirin in people with diabetes and no cardiovascular

DARE.2009

244. Review: aspirin does not reduce CV events but may reduce non-fatal stroke in peripheral artery disease

Review: aspirin does not reduce CV events but may reduce non-fatal stroke in peripheral artery disease Review: aspirin does not reduce CV events but may reduce non-fatal stroke in peripheral artery disease | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search (...) for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: aspirin does not reduce CV events but may reduce non-fatal stroke in peripheral artery disease Article Text Therapeutics Review: aspirin does not reduce CV events but may reduce non-fatal stroke in peripheral artery disease Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2009

245. Review: aspirin reduces vascular events but increases bleeding in primary and secondary prevention

Review: aspirin reduces vascular events but increases bleeding in primary and secondary prevention Review: aspirin reduces vascular events but increases bleeding in primary and secondary prevention | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword (...) Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: aspirin reduces vascular events but increases bleeding in primary and secondary prevention Article Text Therapeutics Review: aspirin reduces vascular events but increases bleeding in primary and secondary prevention Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available for this article. Question

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2009

246. Aspirin in the primary and secondary prevention of vascular disease: collaborative meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised trials

Aspirin in the primary and secondary prevention of vascular disease: collaborative meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised trials Aspirin in the primary and secondary prevention of vascular disease: collaborative meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised trials Aspirin in the primary and secondary prevention of vascular disease: collaborative meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised trials Antithrombotic Trialists' (ATT) Collaboration (...) CRD summary This review concluded that the use of aspirin for the prevention of cardiac events needed to be weighed against an increase in major bleeds. There was no justification in advocating the routine use of aspirin. Despite some concerns, the analyses contained a large number of people and the results seemed consistent. The conservative conclusions were likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To evaluate the prevention of cardiovascular events and incidence of major bleeding associated

DARE.2009

247. Aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with peripheral artery disease: a meta-analysis of randomized trials

Aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with peripheral artery disease: a meta-analysis of randomized trials Aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with peripheral artery disease: a meta-analysis of randomized trials Aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with peripheral artery disease: a meta-analysis of randomized trials Berger J S, Krantz M J, Kittelson J M, Hiatt W R CRD summary This review found that aspirin (...) treatment in patients with peripheral artery disease provided a statistically significant reduction in nonfatal stroke but not in cardiovascular events. The authors also concluded that given the limited statistical power of their analysis, further randomised controlled trials are required. These cautious conclusions are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To assess the effect of aspirin on cardiovascular event rates in patients with peripheral artery disease. Searching MEDLINE, Cochrane Central

DARE.2009

248. Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgical patients receiving aspirin: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgical patients receiving aspirin: a systematic review and meta-analysis Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgical patients receiving aspirin: a systematic review and meta-analysis Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgical patients receiving aspirin: a systematic review and meta-analysis McIlroy D R, Myles P S, Phillips L E, Smith J A CRD summary This review concluded that antifibrinolytic agents were effective for reducing chest-tube drainage and transfusion requirements (...) for low risk patients undergoing cardiac surgery who were receiving aspirin, but there was no benefit for adverse events. The authors' conclusions are reasonable and likely to be reliable, provided they are applied to a low risk population. Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy and adverse events associated with antifibrinolytic agents in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who are maintained on aspirin. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were

DARE.2009

250. Aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole and clopidogrel were similarly effective for preventing recurrent stroke

Aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole and clopidogrel were similarly effective for preventing recurrent stroke Aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole and clopidogrel were similarly effective for preventing recurrent stroke | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name (...) or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole and clopidogrel were similarly effective for preventing recurrent stroke Article Text Therapeutics Aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole and clopidogrel were similarly effective for preventing recurrent stroke Statistics from

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2009

251. Effect of clopidogrel added to aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation.

Effect of clopidogrel added to aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation. 19336502 2009 05 14 2009 05 19 2013 11 21 1533-4406 360 20 2009 May 14 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Effect of clopidogrel added to aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation. 2066-78 10.1056/NEJMoa0901301 Vitamin K antagonists reduce the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation but are considered unsuitable in many patients, who usually receive aspirin instead. We investigated (...) the hypothesis that the addition of clopidogrel to aspirin would reduce the risk of vascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation. A total of 7554 patients with atrial fibrillation who had an increased risk of stroke and for whom vitamin K-antagonist therapy was unsuitable were randomly assigned to receive clopidogrel (75 mg) or placebo, once daily, in addition to aspirin. The primary outcome was the composite of stroke, myocardial infarction, non-central nervous system systemic embolism, or death

NEJM2009

252. Famotidine for the prevention of peptic ulcers and oesophagitis in patients taking low-dose aspirin (FAMOUS): a phase III, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Famotidine for the prevention of peptic ulcers and oesophagitis in patients taking low-dose aspirin (FAMOUS): a phase III, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. 19577798 2009 07 14 2009 07 31 2015 06 16 1474-547X 374 9684 2009 Jul 11 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Famotidine for the prevention of peptic ulcers and oesophagitis in patients taking low-dose aspirin (FAMOUS): a phase III, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. 119-25 10.1016/S0140-6736(09)61246-0 (...) There are few therapeutic options for the prevention of gastrointestinal mucosal damage caused by low-dose aspirin. We therefore investigated the efficacy of famotidine, a well-tolerated histamine H(2)-receptor antagonist, in the prevention of peptic ulcers and erosive oesophagitis in patients receiving low-dose aspirin for vascular protection. Adult patients (aged >/=18 years) from the cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and diabetes clinics at Crosshouse Hospital, Kilmarnock, UK, were eligible for enrolment

Lancet2009

253. Effect of dipyridamole plus aspirin on hemodialysis graft patency.

Effect of dipyridamole plus aspirin on hemodialysis graft patency. 19458364 2009 05 21 2009 06 01 2016 12 15 1533-4406 360 21 2009 May 21 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Effect of dipyridamole plus aspirin on hemodialysis graft patency. 2191-201 10.1056/NEJMoa0805840 Arteriovenous graft stenosis leading to thrombosis is a major cause of complications in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Procedural interventions may restore patency but are costly. Although there is no proven (...) pharmacologic therapy, dipyridamole may be promising because of its known vascular antiproliferative activity. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of extended-release dipyridamole, at a dose of 200 mg, and aspirin, at a dose of 25 mg, given twice daily after the placement of a new arteriovenous graft until the primary outcome, loss of primary unassisted patency (i.e., patency without thrombosis or requirement for intervention), was reached. Secondary outcomes were cumulative

NEJM2009 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

255. Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent stroke in patients with ischaemic stroke in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFE

Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent stroke in patients with ischaemic stroke in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFE 18757238 2008 10 13 2008 12 18 2016 12 15 1474-4422 7 10 2008 Oct The Lancet. Neurology Lancet Neurol Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent (...) telmisartan were investigated in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial. Patients who had had an ischaemic stroke were randomly assigned in a two by two factorial design to receive either 25 mg aspirin (ASA) and 200 mg extended-release dipyridamole (ER-DP) twice a day or 75 mg clopidogrel once a day, and either 80 mg telmisartan or placebo once per day. The predefined endpoints for this substudy were disability after a recurrent stroke, assessed with the modified

EvidenceUpdates2008 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

256. Review: oral anticoagulants plus aspirin reduce arterial thromboembolism more than oral anticoagulants alone but only in patients with mechanical heart valves

Review: oral anticoagulants plus aspirin reduce arterial thromboembolism more than oral anticoagulants alone but only in patients with mechanical heart valves Review: oral anticoagulants plus aspirin reduce arterial thromboembolism more than oral anticoagulants alone but only in patients with mechanical heart valves | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in via your Society Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: oral anticoagulants plus aspirin reduce arterial thromboembolism more than oral anticoagulants alone but only in patients

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2008

257. Cilostazol as an alternative to aspirin after ischaemic stroke: a randomised, double-blind, pilot study

Cilostazol as an alternative to aspirin after ischaemic stroke: a randomised, double-blind, pilot study 18456558 2008 05 19 2008 07 25 2016 07 19 1474-4422 7 6 2008 Jun The Lancet. Neurology Lancet Neurol Cilostazol as an alternative to aspirin after ischaemic stroke: a randomised, double-blind, pilot study. 494-9 10.1016/S1474-4422(08)70094-2 Most patients who have had a stroke are given aspirin; however, aspirin-related cerebral haemorrhage is a complication that is currently of concern (...) , particularly in China where there is a high incidence of cerebral haemorrhage in secondary prevention programmes and within the community. Cilostazol, a phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) inhibitor, is an alternative to aspirin that works through a different mechanism. This trial aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of cilostazol with that of aspirin for the long-term prevention of the recurrence of ischaemic stroke. 720 patients (mean age 60.2 years, SD 9.86) who had had an ischaemic stroke within

EvidenceUpdates2008

258. Sarpogrelate-Aspirin Comparative Clinical Study for Efficacy and Safety in Secondary Prevention of Cerebral Infarction (S-ACCESS): A randomized, double-blind, aspirin-controlled trial

Sarpogrelate-Aspirin Comparative Clinical Study for Efficacy and Safety in Secondary Prevention of Cerebral Infarction (S-ACCESS): A randomized, double-blind, aspirin-controlled trial 18388340 2008 05 28 2008 07 03 2016 11 22 1524-4628 39 6 2008 Jun Stroke Stroke Sarpogrelate-Aspirin Comparative Clinical Study for Efficacy and Safety in Secondary Prevention of Cerebral Infarction (S-ACCESS): A randomized, double-blind, aspirin-controlled trial. 1827-33 10.1161/STROKEAHA.107.505131 (...) The antiplatelet agent sarpogrelate is a selective inhibitor of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of sarpogrelate with those of aspirin in Japanese ischemic stroke patients. In total, 1510 patients with recent cerebral infarction (1 week to 6 months after onset) were randomly assigned to receive either sarpogrelate (100 mg TID) or aspirin (81 mg/d). Mean follow-up period was 1.59 years. The primary efficacy end point was recurrence of cerebral

EvidenceUpdates2008

259. Aspirin and folic acid for the prevention of recurrent colorectal adenomas

Aspirin and folic acid for the prevention of recurrent colorectal adenomas 18022173 2008 01 01 2008 02 05 2013 11 21 1528-0012 134 1 2008 Jan Gastroenterology Gastroenterology Aspirin and folic acid for the prevention of recurrent colorectal adenomas. 29-38 Although observational studies have found regular aspirin use to be associated with a reduced risk of colorectal neoplasia, results from randomized trials using aspirin have been inconsistent. Dietary folate intake also has been found (...) to be associated with a reduced risk of colorectal neoplasms in observational studies. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial of aspirin (300 mg/day) and folate supplements (0.5 mg/day) to prevent colorectal adenoma recurrence was performed using a 2 x 2 factorial design. All patients had an adenoma (>/=0.5 cm) removed in the 6 months before recruitment and were followed-up at 4-month intervals with a second colonoscopy after approximately 3 years. The primary outcome measure was a colorectal adenoma

EvidenceUpdates2008

260. Aspirin in Alzheimer`s disease (AD2000): a randomised open-label trial.

Aspirin in Alzheimer`s disease (AD2000): a randomised open-label trial. 18068522 2007 12 20 2008 03 21 2014 08 15 1474-4422 7 1 2008 Jan The Lancet. Neurology Lancet Neurol Aspirin in Alzheimer's disease (AD2000): a randomised open-label trial. 41-9 Cardiovascular risk factors and a history of vascular disease can increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is less common in aspirin users than non-users, and there are plausible biological mechanisms whereby aspirin might slow (...) the progression of either vascular or Alzheimer-type pathology. We assessed the benefits of aspirin in patients with AD. 310 community-resident patients who had AD and who had no potential indication or definite contraindication for aspirin were randomly assigned to receive open-label aspirin (n=156; one 75-mg enteric-coated tablet per day, to continue indefinitely) or to avoid aspirin (n=154). Primary outcome measures were cognition (assessed with the mini-mental state examination [MMSE]) and functional

EvidenceUpdates2008