Latest & greatest articles for aspirin

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Aspirin

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) more commonly known as aspirin is a painkiller that has a wide range of uses. It is frequently used to treat fever, mild pain, tooth aches, headaches and muscle aches. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and can be used in the management of conditions such as heart attack, arthritis, blood clots and stroke. Aspirin, has been used for thousands of years, initially extracted from the leaves of willow trees.

Aspirin works in much the same way as other NSAIDs but has additional properties, such as antiplatelet activity which can make it additionally useful. More recently aspirin has been linked with cancer prevention. But the potential benefits of aspirin need to be weighed against the potential side effects, which includes gastrointestinal bleeding and Reye’s syndrome. It should be noted that aspirin should not be used in people who are allergic to drugs such as ibuprofen or a more generalized intolerance to NSAIDs. It should also be used cautiously in asthmatics and/or those with bronchospasm associated with NSAID use.

Research evidence, clinical trials and guidelines on Aspirin

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on aspirin ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for aspirin

221. Double-dose versus standard-dose clopidogrel and high-dose versus low-dose aspirin in individuals undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndromes (CURRENT-OASIS 7): a randomised factorial trial.

Double-dose versus standard-dose clopidogrel and high-dose versus low-dose aspirin in individuals undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndromes (CURRENT-OASIS 7): a randomised factorial trial. 20817281 2010 10 11 2010 10 27 2015 06 16 1474-547X 376 9748 2010 Oct 09 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Double-dose versus standard-dose clopidogrel and high-dose versus low-dose aspirin in individuals undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndromes (...) (CURRENT-OASIS 7): a randomised factorial trial. 1233-43 10.1016/S0140-6736(10)61088-4 Clopidogrel and aspirin are the most commonly used antiplatelet therapies for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We assessed the effect of various clopidogrel and aspirin regimens in prevention of major cardiovascular events and stent thrombosis in patients undergoing PCI. The CURRENT-OASIS 7 trial was undertaken in 597 centres in 39 countries. 25,086 individuals with acute coronary syndromes and intended

Lancet2010

222. Dose comparisons of clopidogrel and aspirin in acute coronary syndromes.

Dose comparisons of clopidogrel and aspirin in acute coronary syndromes. 20818903 2010 09 07 2010 09 16 2013 11 21 1533-4406 363 10 2010 Sep 02 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Dose comparisons of clopidogrel and aspirin in acute coronary syndromes. 930-42 10.1056/NEJMoa0909475 Clopidogrel and aspirin are widely used for patients with acute coronary syndromes and those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, evidence-based guidelines for dosing have (...) not been established for either agent. We randomly assigned, in a 2-by-2 factorial design, 25,086 patients with an acute coronary syndrome who were referred for an invasive strategy to either double-dose clopidogrel (a 600-mg loading dose on day 1, followed by 150 mg daily for 6 days and 75 mg daily thereafter) or standard-dose clopidogrel (a 300-mg loading dose and 75 mg daily thereafter) and either higher-dose aspirin (300 to 325 mg daily) or lower-dose aspirin (75 to 100 mg daily). The primary

NEJM2010

223. Aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular events in a general population screened for a low ankle brachial index: a randomized controlled trial.

Aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular events in a general population screened for a low ankle brachial index: a randomized controlled trial. 20197530 2010 03 03 2010 03 08 2016 11 22 1538-3598 303 9 2010 Mar 03 JAMA JAMA Aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular events in a general population screened for a low ankle brachial index: a randomized controlled trial. 841-8 10.1001/jama.2010.221 A low ankle brachial index (ABI) indicates atherosclerosis and an increased risk of cardiovascular (...) and cerebrovascular events. Screening for a low ABI can identify an asymptomatic higher risk group potentially amenable to preventive treatments. To determine the effectiveness of aspirin in preventing events in people with a low ABI identified on screening the general population. The Aspirin for Asymptomatic Atherosclerosis trial was an intention-to-treat double-blind randomized controlled trial conducted from April 1998 to October 2008, involving 28,980 men and women aged 50 to 75 years living in central

JAMA2010

224. Aspirin plus heparin or aspirin alone in women with recurrent miscarriage.

Aspirin plus heparin or aspirin alone in women with recurrent miscarriage. 20335572 2010 04 29 2010 05 04 2013 11 21 1533-4406 362 17 2010 Apr 29 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Aspirin plus heparin or aspirin alone in women with recurrent miscarriage. 1586-96 10.1056/NEJMoa1000641 Aspirin and low-molecular-weight heparin are prescribed for women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage, with the goal of improving the rate of live births, but limited data from randomized (...) , controlled trials are available to support the use of these drugs. In this randomized trial, we enrolled 364 women between the ages of 18 and 42 years who had a history of unexplained recurrent miscarriage and were attempting to conceive or were less than 6 weeks pregnant. We then randomly assigned them to receive daily 80 mg of aspirin plus open-label subcutaneous nadroparin (at a dose of 2850 IU, starting as soon as a viable pregnancy was demonstrated), 80 mg of aspirin alone, or placebo. The primary

NEJM2010

225. Aspirin for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease: Published Comments and Response

Aspirin for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease: Published Comments and Response U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: Aspirin for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease [Published Comments and Response] Your browser doesn't support JavaScript. Please upgrade to a modern browser or enable JavaScript in your existing browser. Search | | | | | | | You Are Here: > > > Published Comments & Response Published Comments and Response Aspirin for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease First (...) published as Letters to the Editor in Annals of Internal Medicine 151(58):587-88, October 20, 2009. / / TO THE EDITOR: The recently updated U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) guidelines ( ) on aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease are an ideal example of evidence-based medicine in action. Although we cannot fully explain why aspirin effects differ by sex, the evidence strongly suggests that they do. Now our guidelines, and practices, can reflect that. The concept makes

Publication 3262009

227. Intensifying Platelet Inhibition With Tirofiban in Poor Responders to Aspirin, Clopidogrel, or Both Agents Undergoing Elective Coronary Intervention

Intensifying Platelet Inhibition With Tirofiban in Poor Responders to Aspirin, Clopidogrel, or Both Agents Undergoing Elective Coronary Intervention 19528337 2009 06 30 2009 07 22 2014 11 20 1524-4539 119 25 2009 Jun 30 Circulation Circulation Intensifying platelet inhibition with tirofiban in poor responders to aspirin, clopidogrel, or both agents undergoing elective coronary intervention: results from the double-blind, prospective, randomized Tailoring Treatment with Tirofiban in Patients (...) Showing Resistance to Aspirin and/or Resistance to Clopidogrel study. 3215-22 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.108.833236 Inhibition of platelet aggregation after aspirin or clopidogrel intake varies greatly among patients, and previous studies have suggested that poor response to oral antiplatelet agents may increase the risk of thrombotic events, especially after coronary angioplasty. Whether this reflects suboptimal platelet inhibition per se, which might benefit from more potent antiplatelet agents

EvidenceUpdates2009

228. Summaries for patients. Aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular disease: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

Summaries for patients. Aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular disease: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Summaries for patients. Aspirin f... preview & related info | Mendeley E-mail address Password ( ) Remember me …or sign in with Search Main Navigation › Short URL Annals of Internal Medicine ( 2009 ) Volume: 150 , Issue: 6 , Pages: I-37 PubMed: Available from or Find this paper at: Abstract Background: Intravenous sodium bicarbonate has been proposed

Annals of Internal Medicine2009

229. Aspirin in cardiology--benefits and risks

Aspirin in cardiology--benefits and risks 19222632 2009 02 19 2009 05 11 2013 11 21 1742-1241 63 3 2009 Mar International journal of clinical practice Int. J. Clin. Pract. Aspirin in cardiology--benefits and risks. 468-77 10.1111/j.1742-1241.2008.01908.x To review the current knowledge of the benefits and risks of long-term aspirin therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Relevant articles published in English between 1996 and 2006 were obtained from the Current Contents Science (...) Edition, EMBASE and MEDLINE databases. Secondary aspirin prophylaxis is effective in reducing the risk of ischaemic events in patients with cardiovascular disease. However, its utility in reducing primary ischaemic events is more controversial; it appears to reduce the incidence of ischaemic stroke, but increase the incidence of haemorrhagic stroke. Aspirin therapy can also lead to an increased risk of gastrointestinal ulcers, upper gastrointestinal bleeding and other haemorrhagic complications. Lower

EvidenceUpdates2009

230. Randomized Trial of Warfarin, Aspirin, and Clopidogrel in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: The Warfarin and Antiplatelet Therapy in Chronic Heart Failure (WATCH) Trial

Randomized Trial of Warfarin, Aspirin, and Clopidogrel in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: The Warfarin and Antiplatelet Therapy in Chronic Heart Failure (WATCH) Trial 19289640 2009 03 31 2009 04 24 2013 11 21 1524-4539 119 12 2009 Mar 31 Circulation Circulation Randomized trial of warfarin, aspirin, and clopidogrel in patients with chronic heart failure: the Warfarin and Antiplatelet Therapy in Chronic Heart Failure (WATCH) trial. 1616-24 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.108.801753 Chronic heart (...) failure remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity. The role of antithrombotic therapy in patients with chronic heart failure has long been debated. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal antithrombotic agent for heart failure patients with reduced ejection fractions who are in sinus rhythm. This prospective, randomized clinical trial of open-label warfarin (target international normalized ratio of 2.5 to 3.0) and double-blind treatment with either aspirin (162 mg once daily

EvidenceUpdates2009

231. Aspirin for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

Aspirin for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Preventive Medication: Aspirin for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Your browser doesn't support JavaScript. Please upgrade to a modern browser or enable JavaScript in your existing browser. Search | | | | | | | You Are Here: > > > > Aspirin for Prevention: Cardiovascular Disease Aspirin for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Release Date: March 2009 / Summary of Recommendations The USPSTF recommends the use of aspirin for men (...) age 45 to 79 years when the potential benefit due to a reduction in myocardial infarctions outweighs the potential harm due to an increase in gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Grade: . The USPSTF recommends the use of aspirin for women age 55 to 79 years when the potential benefit of a reduction in ischemic strokes outweighs the potential harm of an increase in gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Grade: . The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits

Publication 3262009

232. Aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular disease: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

Aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular disease: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. DESCRIPTION: Update of the 2002 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation about the use of aspirin for the prevention of coronary heart disease. METHODS: Review of the literature since 2002, focusing on new evidence on the benefits and harms of aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction and stroke. The new (...) evidence was reviewed and synthesized according to sex. RECOMMENDATIONS: Encourage men age 45 to 79 years to use aspirin when the potential benefit of a reduction in myocardial infarctions outweighs the potential harm of an increase in gastrointestinal hemorrhage. (A recommendation) Encourage women age 55 to 79 years to use aspirin when the potential benefit of a reduction in ischemic strokes outweighs the potential harm of an increase in gastrointestinal hemorrhage. (A recommendation) Evidence

Annals of Internal Medicine2009

233. Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: an update of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: an update of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. BACKGROUND: Coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease are leading causes of death in the United States. In 2002, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) strongly recommended that clinicians discuss aspirin with adults who are at increased risk for coronary heart disease. PURPOSE: To determine the benefits and harms of taking aspirin for (...) the primary prevention of myocardial infarctions, strokes, and death. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and Cochrane Library (search dates, 1 January 2001 to 28 August 2008), recent systematic reviews, reference lists of retrieved articles, and suggestions from experts. STUDY SELECTION: English-language randomized, controlled trials (RCTs); case-control studies; meta-analyses; and systematic reviews of aspirin versus control for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) were selected to answer

Annals of Internal Medicine2009

234. Low Molecular Weight Heparin and Aspirin for Recurrent Pregnancy Loss: Results from the Randomized, Controlled HepASA Trial

Low Molecular Weight Heparin and Aspirin for Recurrent Pregnancy Loss: Results from the Randomized, Controlled HepASA Trial

EvidenceUpdates2009

235. Aspirin or anticoagulants for treating recurrent miscarriage in women without antiphospholipid syndrome.

Aspirin or anticoagulants for treating recurrent miscarriage in women without antiphospholipid syndrome. BACKGROUND: Since hypercoagulability might result in recurrent miscarriage, anticoagulant agents could potentially increase the live-birth rate in subsequent pregnancies in women with either inherited thrombophilia or unexplained recurrent miscarriage. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of anticoagulant agents, such as aspirin and heparin, in women with a history of at least two (...) the effect of anticoagulant treatment on the live-birth rate in women with a history of at least two miscarriages (up to 20 weeks of amenorrhoea) without apparent causes other than inherited thrombophilia were eligible. Interventions included aspirin, unfractionated heparin, and low molecular weight heparin for the prevention of miscarriage. One treatment could be compared with another or with placebo. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors assessed the trials for inclusion in the review and extracted

Cochrane2009

236. Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: an update of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: an update of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: an update of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: an update of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Wolff T, Miller T, Ko S Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology (...) assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Wolff T, Miller T, Ko S. Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: an update of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Rockville: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Evidence Synthesis No 68. 2009 Authors' objectives To determine the benefits and harms of taking aspirin for the primary prevention of myocardial infarctions

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2009

237. Aspirin for the chemoprevention of colorectal adenomas: meta-analysis of the randomized trials

Aspirin for the chemoprevention of colorectal adenomas: meta-analysis of the randomized trials Aspirin for the chemoprevention of colorectal adenomas: meta-analysis of the randomized trials Aspirin for the chemoprevention of colorectal adenomas: meta-analysis of the randomized trials Cole BF, Logan RF, Halabi S, Benamouzig R, Sandler RS, Grainge MJ, Chaussade S, Baron JA CRD summary The review concluded that aspirin was effective for prevention of colorectal adenomas in individuals (...) with a history of such lesions. Limited reporting of several aspects of the review means the authors' conclusions should be interpreted with caution. Authors' objectives To investigate whether aspirin reduced the risk of colorectal adenomas. Searching MEDLINE and Web of Science were searched. Search terms were reported. Colleagues were consulted to help identify unpublished studies. Study selection Double-blinded randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of aspirin (any dose given for at least one year

DARE.2009

238. Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing patients with and without diabetes

Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing patients with and without diabetes Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing patients with and without diabetes Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing patients with and without diabetes Calvin AD, Aggarwal NR, Hassan Murad M, Shi Q, Elamin MB, Geske JB (...) , Fernandez-Balsells MM, Albuquerque FN, Lampropulos JF, Erwin PJ, Smith SA, Montori VM CRD summary This review aimed to determine whether the effect of aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular events and mortality differed for patients with and without diabetes. It concluded that available evidence was insufficient to conclusively show a benefit of aspirin therapy in patients with diabetes; the relative benefit may be similar to that in patients without diabetes. These conclusions appear appropriately

DARE.2009

239. The effect of aspirin in the recurrence of colorectal adenomas: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

The effect of aspirin in the recurrence of colorectal adenomas: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials The effect of aspirin in the recurrence of colorectal adenomas: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials The effect of aspirin in the recurrence of colorectal adenomas: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Gao F, Liao C, Liu L, Tan A, Cao Y, Mo Z CRD summary The review found that aspirin use reduces the risk of recurrent adenomas in patients with a history (...) of colorectal adenomas. The authors' conclusions reflected the evidence base, but the reliability of the conclusions is not clear due to potential bias in the review process and a limited evidence base. Authors' objectives To assess the effect of aspirin use in the prevention of the recurrence of colorectal adenomas. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched from inception to July 2008 without language restrictions; limited search terms were

DARE.2009

240. Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in people with diabetes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in people with diabetes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in people with diabetes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in people with diabetes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials De Berardis G, Sacco M, Strippoli GF, Pellegrini F, Graziano G, Tognoni G, Nicolucci A CRD summary This review (...) concluded that a clear benefit of aspirin in the primary prevention of major cardiovascular events in people with diabetes was not proven. The pooled results should be viewed with caution; they were from studies with varied populations and aspirin regimens and might not represent the entire evidence base. Given the evidence presented, the conclusion seems to be appropriate. Authors' objectives To evaluate the benefits and disadvantages of low dose aspirin in people with diabetes and no cardiovascular

DARE.2009