Latest & greatest articles for aspirin

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Aspirin

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) more commonly known as aspirin is a painkiller that has a wide range of uses. It is frequently used to treat fever, mild pain, tooth aches, headaches and muscle aches. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and can be used in the management of conditions such as heart attack, arthritis, blood clots and stroke. Aspirin, has been used for thousands of years, initially extracted from the leaves of willow trees.

Aspirin works in much the same way as other NSAIDs but has additional properties, such as antiplatelet activity which can make it additionally useful. More recently aspirin has been linked with cancer prevention. But the potential benefits of aspirin need to be weighed against the potential side effects, which includes gastrointestinal bleeding and Reye’s syndrome. It should be noted that aspirin should not be used in people who are allergic to drugs such as ibuprofen or a more generalized intolerance to NSAIDs. It should also be used cautiously in asthmatics and/or those with bronchospasm associated with NSAID use.

Research evidence, clinical trials and guidelines on Aspirin

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on aspirin ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for aspirin

181. Warfarin and aspirin in patients with heart failure and sinus rhythm.

Warfarin and aspirin in patients with heart failure and sinus rhythm. 22551105 2012 05 17 2012 05 24 2016 12 15 1533-4406 366 20 2012 May 17 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Warfarin and aspirin in patients with heart failure and sinus rhythm. 1859-69 10.1056/NEJMoa1202299 It is unknown whether warfarin or aspirin therapy is superior for patients with heart failure who are in sinus rhythm. We designed this trial to determine whether warfarin (with a target (...) international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.5) or aspirin (at a dose of 325 mg per day) is a better treatment for patients in sinus rhythm who have a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). We followed 2305 patients for up to 6 years (mean [±SD], 3.5±1.8). The primary outcome was the time to the first event in a composite end point of ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, or death from any cause. The rates of the primary outcome were 7.47 events per 100 patient-years in the warfarin group and 7.93

NEJM2012 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

182. Aspirin for preventing the recurrence of venous thromboembolism.

Aspirin for preventing the recurrence of venous thromboembolism. 22621626 2012 05 24 2012 05 31 2014 11 20 1533-4406 366 21 2012 May 24 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Aspirin for preventing the recurrence of venous thromboembolism. 1959-67 10.1056/NEJMoa1114238 About 20% of patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism have a recurrence within 2 years after the withdrawal of oral anticoagulant therapy. Extending anticoagulation prevents recurrences but is associated (...) with increased bleeding. The benefit of aspirin for the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism is unknown. In this multicenter, investigator-initiated, double-blind study, patients with first-ever unprovoked venous thromboembolism who had completed 6 to 18 months of oral anticoagulant treatment were randomly assigned to aspirin, 100 mg daily, or placebo for 2 years, with the option of extending the study treatment. The primary efficacy outcome was recurrence of venous thromboembolism, and major

NEJM2012

183. Early administration of aspirin in patients treated with alteplase for acute ischaemic stroke: a randomised controlled trial.

Early administration of aspirin in patients treated with alteplase for acute ischaemic stroke: a randomised controlled trial. 22748820 2012 08 27 2012 09 10 2015 06 16 1474-547X 380 9843 2012 Aug 25 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Early administration of aspirin in patients treated with alteplase for acute ischaemic stroke: a randomised controlled trial. 731-7 10.1016/S0140-6736(12)60949-0 Thrombolysis with intravenous alteplase is the only approved treatment for acute ischaemic stroke. After (...) alteplase-induced recanalisation, reocclusion occurs in 14-34% of patients, probably because of platelet activation. Early administration of antiplatelet therapy after alteplase could reduce the risk of reocclusion and improve outcome. We compared the effects of early addition of intravenous aspirin to alteplase with standard alteplase without aspirin. In this multicentre, randomised, open-label trial with blind-endpoint assessment, patients with acute ischaemic stroke treated with alteplase were

Lancet2012

184. Effects of clopidogrel added to aspirin in patients with recent lacunar stroke.

Effects of clopidogrel added to aspirin in patients with recent lacunar stroke. 22931315 2012 08 30 2012 09 07 2016 12 15 1533-4406 367 9 2012 Aug 30 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Effects of clopidogrel added to aspirin in patients with recent lacunar stroke. 817-25 10.1056/NEJMoa1204133 Lacunar infarcts are a frequent type of stroke caused mainly by cerebral small-vessel disease. The effectiveness of antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention has not been defined. We (...) conducted a double-blind, multicenter trial involving 3020 patients with recent symptomatic lacunar infarcts identified by magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 75 mg of clopidogrel or placebo daily; patients in both groups received 325 mg of aspirin daily. The primary outcome was any recurrent stroke, including ischemic stroke and intracranial hemorrhage. The participants had a mean age of 63 years, and 63% were men. After a mean follow-up of 3.4 years, the risk

NEJM2012 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

185. Low-dose aspirin for preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism.

Low-dose aspirin for preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism. 23121403 2012 11 22 2012 12 05 2014 11 20 1533-4406 367 21 2012 Nov 22 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Low-dose aspirin for preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism. 1979-87 10.1056/NEJMoa1210384 Patients who have had a first episode of unprovoked venous thromboembolism have a high risk of recurrence after anticoagulants are discontinued. Aspirin may be effective in preventing a recurrence of venous (...) thromboembolism. We randomly assigned 822 patients who had completed initial anticoagulant therapy after a first episode of unprovoked venous thromboembolism to receive aspirin, at a dose of 100 mg daily, or placebo for up to 4 years. The primary outcome was a recurrence of venous thromboembolism. During a median follow-up period of 37.2 months, venous thromboembolism recurred in 73 of 411 patients assigned to placebo and in 57 of 411 assigned to aspirin (a rate of 6.5% per year vs. 4.8% per year; hazard

NEJM2012

186. Cost-effectiveness analysis: cardiovascular benefits of proton pump inhibitor co-therapy in patients using aspirin for secondary prevention

Cost-effectiveness analysis: cardiovascular benefits of proton pump inhibitor co-therapy in patients using aspirin for secondary prevention Cost-effectiveness analysis: cardiovascular benefits of proton pump inhibitor co-therapy in patients using aspirin for secondary prevention Cost-effectiveness analysis: cardiovascular benefits of proton pump inhibitor co-therapy in patients using aspirin for secondary prevention Saini SD, Fendrick AM, Scheiman JM Record Status This is a critical abstract (...) of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary This study examined the cost-effectiveness of proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) co-therapy to reduce dyspepsia in patients aged 50 years or older, receiving long-term, low-dose aspirin, for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2011

187. Cost effectiveness of warfarin versus aspirin in patients older than 75 years with atrial fibrillation

Cost effectiveness of warfarin versus aspirin in patients older than 75 years with atrial fibrillation Cost effectiveness of warfarin versus aspirin in patients older than 75 years with atrial fibrillation Cost effectiveness of warfarin versus aspirin in patients older than 75 years with atrial fibrillation Jowett S, Bryan S, Mant J, Fletcher K, Roalfe A, Fitzmaurice D, Lip GY, Hobbs FD Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion (...) on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of anticoagulation therapy, using warfarin, compared with aspirin, for patients with atrial fibrillation aged over 75 years. The authors concluded that warfarin appeared to be cost-effective for these patients, but the differences in costs

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2011

188. [Dipyridamole and aspirin for secondary prevention after stroke or TIA]

[Dipyridamole and aspirin for secondary prevention after stroke or TIA] Dipyridamol + ASS zur sekundarpravention nach schlaganfall oder TIA [Dipyridamole and aspirin for secondary prevention after stroke or TIA] Dipyridamol + ASS zur sekundarpravention nach schlaganfall oder TIA [Dipyridamole and aspirin for secondary prevention after stroke or TIA] IQWiG Citation IQWiG. Dipyridamol + ASS zur sekundarpravention nach schlaganfall oder TIA. [Dipyridamole and aspirin for secondary prevention after (...) stroke or TIA] Cologne: Institut fuer Qualitaet und Wirtschaftlichkeit im Gesundheitswesen (IQWiG). IQWiG-Berichte 81. 2011 Authors' objectives The aim of this research was to assess the benefit of treatment with the combination of the two agents dipyridamole plus ASA as secondary prevention after an ischaemic stroke or TIA. This combination therapy was compared to other drug interventions or placebo on the basis of patient-relevant outcomes. Authors' conclusions There is an indication of a benefit

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2011

189. Cost effectiveness of warfarin versus aspirin in patients older than 75 years with atrial fibrillation

Cost effectiveness of warfarin versus aspirin in patients older than 75 years with atrial fibrillation 21512184 2011 05 30 2011 08 05 2016 11 22 1524-4628 42 6 2011 Jun Stroke Stroke Cost effectiveness of warfarin versus aspirin in patients older than 75 years with atrial fibrillation. 1717-21 10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.600767 Oral anticoagulants are effective at reducing stroke compared with aspirin in atrial fibrillation patients older than 75 years. Although the benefits of reduced stroke risk (...) outweigh the risks of bleeding, the cost effectiveness of warfarin in this patient population has not yet been established. An economic evaluation was conducted alongside a randomized, controlled trial; 973 patients ≥75 years of age with atrial fibrillation were recruited from primary care and randomly assigned to either take warfarin or aspirin. Follow-up was for a mean of 2.7 years. Costs of thrombotic and hemorrhagic events, anticoagulation clinic visits, and primary care utilization were determined

EvidenceUpdates2011

190. Discontinuation of low dose aspirin and risk of myocardial infarction: case-control study in UK primary care.

Discontinuation of low dose aspirin and risk of myocardial infarction: case-control study in UK primary care. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the risk of myocardial infarction and death from coronary heart disease after discontinuation of low dose aspirin in primary care patients with a history of cardiovascular events. DESIGN: Nested case-control study. SETTING: The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database in the United Kingdom. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals aged 50-84 with a first prescription (...) for aspirin (75-300 mg/day) for secondary prevention of cardiovascular outcomes in 2000-7 (n=39,513). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Individuals were followed up for a mean of 3.2 years to identify cases of non-fatal myocardial infarction or death from coronary heart disease. A nested case-control analysis assessed the risk of these events in those who had stopped taking low dose aspirin compared with those who had continued treatment. RESULTS: There were 876 non-fatal myocardial infarctions and 346 deaths from

BMJ2011 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

191. Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke

Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke – TheNNTTheNNT Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke 1667 for cardiac benefit In Summary, for those who aspirin daily for a year: Benefits in NNT 99.94% saw no benefit 0% were helped by avoiding death 0.05% were helped by preventing a non-fatal heart attack 0.01% were helped by preventing a non-fatal stroke 1 in 1667 were helped (cardiovascular problem prevented) None were helped (...) (prevented death) 1 in 2000 were helped (prevented non-fatal heart attack) 1 in 10000 were helped (prevented non-fatal stroke) Harms in NNT 0.03% were harmed by developing a major bleeding event 1 in 3333 were harmed (major bleeding event ) *Required hospital admission and transfusion View As: NNT % Source: Efficacy Endpoints: Heart attack, stroke, death Harm Endpoints: Bleeding, death Narrative: Aspirin blocks the action of platelets, reducing clots and ostensibly lowering the risk of heart attacks

theNNT2011

192. Aspirin for Cardiovascular Prevention (After Prior Heart Attack or Stroke)

Aspirin for Cardiovascular Prevention (After Prior Heart Attack or Stroke) Aspirin for Cardiovascular Prevention (After Prior Heart Attack or Stroke) – TheNNTTheNNT Aspirin to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Known Heart Disease or Strokes 50 for cardiac benefit In Summary, for those who took the aspirin: Benefits in NNT 98% saw no benefit 0.3% were helped by avoiding death 1.3% were helped by preventing a non-fatal heart attack 0.5% were helped by preventing a non-fatal stroke 1 (...) in 50 were helped (cardiovascular problem prevented) 1 in 333 were helped (prevented death) 1 in 77 were helped (prevented non-fatal heart attack) 1 in 200 were helped (prevented non-fatal stroke) Harms in NNT 0.25% were harmed by developing a major bleeding event 1 in 400 were harmed (major bleeding event ) *Required hospital admission and transfusion View As: NNT % Source: Efficacy Endpoints: Heart attack, stroke, death Harm Endpoints: Bleeding, death Narrative: Aspirin blocks the action

theNNT2011

193. Cost-utility of aspirin and proton pump inhibitors for primary prevention

Cost-utility of aspirin and proton pump inhibitors for primary prevention Cost-utility of aspirin and proton pump inhibitors for primary prevention Cost-utility of aspirin and proton pump inhibitors for primary prevention Earnshaw SR, Scheiman J, Fendrick AM, McDade C, Pignone M Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed (...) by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary This study examined the cost-effectiveness of aspirin with or without a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) to prevent gastrointestinal bleeding, while preventing coronary heart disease. Adding a PPI to aspirin was not cost-effective for men with an average risk of bleeding, but was potentially cost-effective for men with an increased risk of bleeding. The cost-effectiveness methods were valid and key areas

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2011

194. Ticagrelor (Brilique) - co-administered with aspirin, for the prevention of atherothrombotic events in adult patients with acute coronary syndromes

Ticagrelor (Brilique) - co-administered with aspirin, for the prevention of atherothrombotic events in adult patients with acute coronary syndromes

Scottish Medicines Consortium2011

195. Aspirin, Warfarin, or Enoxaparin Thromboprophylaxis in Patients With Multiple Myeloma Treated With Thalidomide: A Phase III, Open-Label, Randomized Trial

Aspirin, Warfarin, or Enoxaparin Thromboprophylaxis in Patients With Multiple Myeloma Treated With Thalidomide: A Phase III, Open-Label, Randomized Trial 21282540 2011 03 09 2011 05 09 2013 11 21 1527-7755 29 8 2011 Mar 10 Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology J. Clin. Oncol. Aspirin, warfarin, or enoxaparin thromboprophylaxis in patients with multiple myeloma treated with thalidomide: a phase III, open-label, randomized trial. 986-93 (...) 10.1200/JCO.2010.31.6844 In patients with myeloma, thalidomide significantly improves outcomes but increases the risk of thromboembolic events. In this randomized, open-label, multicenter trial, we compared aspirin (ASA) or fixed low-dose warfarin (WAR) versus low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for preventing thromboembolism in patients with myeloma treated with thalidomide-based regimens. A total of 667 patients with previously untreated myeloma who received thalidomide-containing regimens and had

EvidenceUpdates2011

196. Cost-Utility of Aspirin and Proton Pump Inhibitors for Primary Prevention

Cost-Utility of Aspirin and Proton Pump Inhibitors for Primary Prevention 21325111 2011 02 17 2011 04 04 2016 11 22 1538-3679 171 3 2011 Feb 14 Archives of internal medicine Arch. Intern. Med. Cost-utility of aspirin and proton pump inhibitors for primary prevention. 218-25 10.1001/archinternmed.2010.525 Aspirin reduces myocardial infarction but increases gastrointestinal tract (GI) bleeding. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may reduce upper GI bleeding. We estimate the cost-utility of aspirin (...) treatment with or without a PPI for coronary heart disease (CHD) prevention among men at different risks for CHD and GI bleeding. We updated a Markov model to compare costs and outcomes of low-dose aspirin plus PPI (omeprazole, 20 mg/d), low-dose aspirin alone, or no treatment for CHD prevention. We performed lifetime analyses in men with different risks for cardiovascular events and GI bleeding. Aspirin reduced nonfatal myocardial infarction by 30%, increased total stroke by 6%, and increased GI

EvidenceUpdates2011 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

197. Effect of Timing of Chronic Preoperative Aspirin Discontinuation on Morbidity and Mortality in Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

Effect of Timing of Chronic Preoperative Aspirin Discontinuation on Morbidity and Mortality in Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery 21282503 2011 02 15 2011 04 11 2013 11 21 1524-4539 123 6 2011 Feb 15 Circulation Circulation Effect of timing of chronic preoperative aspirin discontinuation on morbidity and mortality in coronary artery bypass surgery. 577-83 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.110.957373 Aspirin (ASA) has been shown to reduce postoperative coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) mortality and (...) ischemic events; however, the timing of chronic ASA discontinuation before surgery is controversial because of concern about postoperative bleeding. We evaluated the effect of the timing of ASA discontinuation before CABG on major adverse cardiovascular outcomes and postoperative bleeding using the Cleveland Clinic Cardiovascular Information Registry database. At the Cleveland Clinic between January 1, 2002, and January 31, 2008, 4143 patients undergoing CABG were taking preoperative chronic ASA. Of

EvidenceUpdates2011

198. Randomised controlled trial: Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndromes: no difference in 30-day efficacy or safety of high- and low-dose aspirin; double-dose clopidogrel reduces 30-day risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarct

Randomised controlled trial: Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndromes: no difference in 30-day efficacy or safety of high- and low-dose aspirin; double-dose clopidogrel reduces 30-day risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarct Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndromes: no difference in 30-day efficacy or safety of high- and low-dose aspirin; double-dose clopidogrel reduces 30-day risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction or stroke (...) are here Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndromes: no difference in 30-day efficacy or safety of high- and low-dose aspirin; double-dose clopidogrel reduces 30-day risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction or stroke compared with … Article Text Therapeutics Randomised controlled trial Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndromes: no difference in 30-day efficacy or safety of high- and low-dose aspirin; double-dose clopidogrel reduces 30-day risk

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2011

199. Aspirin effect on the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Aspirin effect on the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis Aspirin effect on the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis Aspirin effect on the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis Butalia S, Leung AA, Ghali WA, Rabi DM CRD summary The authors (...) concluded that the results suggested aspirin reduced the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes without cardiovascular disease, but that there also appeared to be higher rates of bleeding and gastrointestinal complications. The authors' conclusions reflect the evidence presented and are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To evaluate the benefits and harms of aspirin for the prevention of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes. Searching

DARE.2011

200. Systematic review with meta analysis: Taking aspirin daily for at least 4 years reduces long-term risk of cancer death

Systematic review with meta analysis: Taking aspirin daily for at least 4 years reduces long-term risk of cancer death Taking aspirin daily for at least 4 years reduces long-term risk of cancer death | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password (...) ? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Taking aspirin daily for at least 4 years reduces long-term risk of cancer death Article Text Adult nursing Systematic review with meta analysis Taking aspirin daily for at least 4 years reduces long-term risk of cancer death Elizabeth Ann Coleman Statistics

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2011