Latest & greatest articles for anxiety

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on anxiety and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Anxiety

Anxiety is the subjectively feelings of dread over anticipated events and it is different from fear. Clinical anxiety is a group of mental disorders with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) being the most common (approximately 22% of primary care attendances for anxiety are classed as GAD). Overall, there is a lifetime prevalence rate of 4-7%. Anxiety can be caused by a number of factors typically classified as environmental surroundings and genetic.

In the past few decades anxiety research has significantly increased. In 2000 there were approximately 430 trials looking at anxiety and by 2015 to over 1,000. This has allowed medical professionals to develop and improve accurate diagnosis and treatments in patients suffering from the condition.

Anxiety is normal in uncomfortable environments or stressful situations. However, some individuals experience intense and persistent amounts of anxiety which needs to be kept under control. Treatments include pharmaceuticals such as SSRIs, benzodiazepines, pregabalin and gabapentin. Other therapies include CBT, acceptance and commitment therapy, and motivational interviewing.

Trip has all the latest evidence relating to treatments for anxiety, this includes systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, controlled trials, evidence-based synopses, case reports and clinical Q&As.

Top results for anxiety

441. A meta-analytic study of self-help interventions for anxiety problems

A meta-analytic study of self-help interventions for anxiety problems A meta-analytic study of self-help interventions for anxiety problems A meta-analytic study of self-help interventions for anxiety problems Hirai M, Clum G A CRD summary The authors concluded that self-help materials were moderately effective in comparison with control groups, while therapist-directed interventions were more effective than self- help interventions in the treatment of both diagnosed and non- diagnosed anxiety (...) problems. The poor reporting of review methods and uncertainty about between-study differences mean that the reliability of the authors' conclusions is uncertain. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of self-help (SH) treatments for individuals with anxiety problems and disorders. Searching MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched from 1960 to 2003 for studies written in the English language; the search terms were not reported. References from relevant papers were also checked. Study selection

DARE.2006

442. Effects of medical crisis intervention on anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress symptoms: a meta-analysis

Effects of medical crisis intervention on anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress symptoms: a meta-analysis Effects of medical crisis intervention on anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress symptoms: a meta-analysis Effects of medical crisis intervention on anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress symptoms: a meta-analysis Stapleton A B, Lating J, Kirkhart M, Everly G S CRD summary This review assessed the effectiveness of medical crisis interventions in patients experiencing (...) . Participants included in the review The included studies identified adult medical patients who had experienced a single traumatic event, such as childbirth or miscarriage for women, a surgical or medical hospital procedure, a motor vehicle accident or other road trauma, or a violent crime, or were a relative of seriously injured or ill patients. Outcomes assessed in the review Studies were eligible for inclusion if they reported anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress symptoms (defined as intrusive

DARE.2006

443. Review of evidence-based psychotherapies for pediatric mood and anxiety disorders

Review of evidence-based psychotherapies for pediatric mood and anxiety disorders Review of evidence-based psychotherapies for pediatric mood and anxiety disorders Review of evidence-based psychotherapies for pediatric mood and anxiety disorders Verdeli H, Mufson L, Lee L, Keith J A CRD summary This review investigated psychotherapeutic interventions, namely cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) and interpersonal therapy (IPT), for paediatric mood and anxiety disorders. The authors concluded (...) that CBT and IPT are effective in some scenarios, but further research is needed. Methodological limitations in the review make the authors' conclusions uncertain. Authors' objectives To review and evaluate the evidence on psychotherapeutic interventions for paediatric mood and anxiety disorders. Searching MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched from 1970 to 2005 using the search terms documented in the report. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review To be eligible, the studies

DARE.2006

444. Psychosocial interventions for depression, anxiety, and quality of life in cancer survivors: meta-analyses

Psychosocial interventions for depression, anxiety, and quality of life in cancer survivors: meta-analyses Psychosocial interventions for depression, anxiety, and quality of life in cancer survivors: meta-analyses Psychosocial interventions for depression, anxiety, and quality of life in cancer survivors: meta-analyses Osborn R L, Demoncada A C, Feuerstein M CRD summary Cognitive behavioural therapy was an effective short-term treatment for depression and anxiety, and had both short- and long (...) -term effects on quality of life in adult cancer survivors. Individual interventions were more effective than group interventions. Methodological limitations of the review mean that the authors' conclusions should be interpreted with caution. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and patient education for the treatment of depression, anxiety, physical functioning and quality of life in adult cancer survivors. Searching MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Cochrane

DARE.2006

445. Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety: review of Technology Appraisal 51

Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety: review of Technology Appraisal 51 Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety: review of Technology Appraisal 51 Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety: review of Technology Appraisal 51 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality (...) of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety: review of Technology Appraisal 51. London: National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Technology Appraisal Guidance 97. 2006 Authors' objectives The aim of this report is to review NICE's Technology Appraisal 51 and investigate computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety. Authors

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2006

446. Cost-effectiveness analysis of escitalopram compared with paroxetine in treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in the United Kingdom

Cost-effectiveness analysis of escitalopram compared with paroxetine in treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in the United Kingdom Cost-effectiveness analysis of escitalopram compared with paroxetine in treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in the United Kingdom Cost-effectiveness analysis of escitalopram compared with paroxetine in treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in the United Kingdom Jorgensen T R, Stein D J, Despiegel N, Drost P B, Hemels M E, Baldwin D S Record Status (...) This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The study compared escitalopram (10 to 20 mg/day) and paroxetine (20 to 50 mg/day) as the first-line treatment for generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2006

447. Cost-utility of brief psychological treatment for depression and anxiety

Cost-utility of brief psychological treatment for depression and anxiety Cost-utility of brief psychological treatment for depression and anxiety Cost-utility of brief psychological treatment for depression and anxiety Hakkaart-van Roijen L, van Straten A, Al M, Rutten F, Donker M Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed (...) by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The study compared three first-line treatments for depression and anxiety. The options were brief therapy, cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and care as usual. Brief therapy consisted of a maximum of 7 sessions. CBT) consisted of a maximum of 15 sessions. Care as usual was "matched care" according to the patient's type. The stepped-care approach was adopted for the first two treatment options

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2006

448. Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety update: a systematic review and economic evaluation

Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety update: a systematic review and economic evaluation Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety update: a systematic review and economic evaluation Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety update: a systematic review and economic evaluation Kaltenthaler E, Brazier J, De Nigris E, Tumur I, Ferriter M, Beverley C, Parry G, Rooney G, Sutcliffe P Record Status (...) This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Kaltenthaler E, Brazier J, De Nigris E, Tumur I, Ferriter M, Beverley C, Parry G, Rooney G, Sutcliffe P. Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety update: a systematic review and economic evaluation. Health Technology Assessment 2006; 10(33): 1-186 Authors' objectives The aim of this review

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2006

449. Amniocentesis results: investigation of anxiety. The ARIA trial.

Amniocentesis results: investigation of anxiety. The ARIA trial. Amniocentesis results: investigation of anxiety. The ARIA trial. Amniocentesis results: investigation of anxiety. The ARIA trial. Hewison J, Nixon J, Fountain J, Cocks K, Jones C, Mason G, Morley S, Thornton J Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Hewison J, Nixon (...) J, Fountain J, Cocks K, Jones C, Mason G, Morley S, Thornton J. Amniocentesis results: investigation of anxiety. The ARIA trial. Health Technology Assessment 2006; 10(50): 1-110 Authors' objectives This trial tested two hypotheses: first, that giving amniocentesis results out on a fixed date alters maternal anxiety during the waiting period, compared with a policy of telling parents that the result will be issued 'when available' (i.e. a variable date), and secondly, that issuing early results

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2006

450. Pregabalin (Lyrica) - Generalised anxiety disorder in adults

Pregabalin (Lyrica) - Generalised anxiety disorder in adults Secretariat - Delta House 50 West Nile Street Glasgow G1 2NP Telephone 0141 225 6997 Fax 0141 248 3778 E-mail rosie.murray@nhshealthquality.org Chairman Professor David Webb Scottish Medicines Consortium pregabalin (Lyrica) (No. 339/06) Pfizer Ltd Statement of Advice 10 November 2006 ADVICE: in the absence of a submission from the holder of the marketing authorisation. Pregabalin (Lyrica) is not recommended for use within NHSScotland (...) for generalised anxiety disorder in adults. The holder of the marketing authorisation has not made a submission to SMC regarding this product in this indication. As a result we cannot recommend its use within NHSScotland. Advice context: No part of this advice may be used without the whole of the advice being quoted in full. This advice represents the view of the Scottish Medicines Consortium. It is provided to inform the considerations of Area Drug & Therapeutics Committees and NHS Boards in Scotland

Scottish Medicines Consortium2006

452. Review: worldwide lifetime prevalence of anxiety disorders is 16.6%, with considerable heterogeneity between studies

Review: worldwide lifetime prevalence of anxiety disorders is 16.6%, with considerable heterogeneity between studies Review: worldwide lifetime prevalence of anxiety disorders is 16.6%, with considerable heterogeneity between studies | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name (...) or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: worldwide lifetime prevalence of anxiety disorders is 16.6%, with considerable heterogeneity between studies Article Text Prevalence Review: worldwide lifetime prevalence of anxiety disorders is 16.6%, with considerable heterogeneity between studies Statistics from

Evidence-Based Mental Health2006

453. Lifetime mood, anxiety, and drug use disorders are common in the United States population

Lifetime mood, anxiety, and drug use disorders are common in the United States population Lifetime mood, anxiety, and drug use disorders are common in the United States population | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search (...) for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Lifetime mood, anxiety, and drug use disorders are common in the United States population Article Text Prevalence Lifetime mood, anxiety, and drug use disorders are common in the United States population Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available for this article. Request permissions If you wish to reuse any

Evidence-Based Mental Health2006

454. The GAD-7 scale was accurate for diagnosing generalised anxiety disorder

The GAD-7 scale was accurate for diagnosing generalised anxiety disorder The GAD-7 scale was accurate for diagnosing generalised anxiety disorder | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your (...) username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here The GAD-7 scale was accurate for diagnosing generalised anxiety disorder Article Text Diagnosis The GAD-7 scale was accurate for diagnosing generalised anxiety disorder Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available for this article. Request permissions If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2006

455. Patients with anxiety and depression wanted to know what to expect when they started their medication

Patients with anxiety and depression wanted to know what to expect when they started their medication Patients with anxiety and depression wanted to know what to expect when they started their medication | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password (...) ? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in via your Society Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Patients with anxiety and depression wanted to know what to expect when they started their medication Article Text Qualitative Patients with anxiety and depression wanted to know what to expect when they started their medication Sarah Mynatt , RN, EdD, APN

Evidence-Based Mental Health2006

457. Effect of different forms of information produced for cancer patients on their use of the information, social support, and anxiety: randomised trial.

Effect of different forms of information produced for cancer patients on their use of the information, social support, and anxiety: randomised trial. 16597660 2006 04 21 2006 05 01 2016 12 15 1756-1833 332 7547 2006 Apr 22 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Effect of different forms of information produced for cancer patients on their use of the information, social support, and anxiety: randomised trial. 942-8 To explore the hypothesis that different methods of selecting and printing information (...) for cancer patients could improve emotional support by affecting interaction with others, and so lead to improved psychological wellbeing. Randomised trial with eight groups (three factors, 2x2x2). Data collected at recruitment and three month follow-up. 400 patients starting radiotherapy, of whom 325 with breast or prostate cancer and complete anxiety and depression data were included in the analysis. Printed booklets: half had only general information from CancerBACUP about each patient's cancer

BMJ2006 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

458. Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety (TA97)

Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety (TA97) Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety | Guidance and guidelines | NICE Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety Technology appraisal guidance [TA97] Published date: 22 February 2006 Last updated: 01 May 2013 Share Guidance on computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for treating depression and anxiety in adults. This guidance replaces NICE technology appraisal (...) guidance on computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (CCBT) for the treatment of depression and anxiety (TA51). Recommendations 1.1 and 1.2 have been updated and replaced by NICE’s guidelines on (CG90) and (CG91). Recommendation 1.3 has been updated and replaced by NICE’s guidelines on (CG113) and (CG159). For the management of panic, please see NICE guideline CG113. For the management of specific phobias (previously known as 'social phobia') please see NICE guideline CG159. No recommendation about

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals2006

459. A trial of problem-solving by community mental health nurses for anxiety, depression and life difficulties among general practice patients. The CPN_GP study

A trial of problem-solving by community mental health nurses for anxiety, depression and life difficulties among general practice patients. The CPN_GP study A trial of problem-solving by community mental health nurses for anxiety, depression and life difficulties among general practice patients. The CPN_GP study Journals Library An error has occurred in processing the XML document An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404

NIHR HTA programme2005

460. Elderly women are at greater risk of comorbid generalised anxiety and depression than elderly men

Elderly women are at greater risk of comorbid generalised anxiety and depression than elderly men Elderly women are at greater risk of comorbid generalised anxiety and depression than elderly men | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword (...) Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Elderly women are at greater risk of comorbid generalised anxiety and depression than elderly men Article Text Aetiology Elderly women are at greater risk of comorbid generalised anxiety and depression than elderly men Free John Cairney , PhD Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available

Evidence-Based Mental Health2005