Latest & greatest articles for anxiety

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Anxiety

Anxiety is the subjectively feelings of dread over anticipated events and it is different from fear. Clinical anxiety is a group of mental disorders with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) being the most common (approximately 22% of primary care attendances for anxiety are classed as GAD). Overall, there is a lifetime prevalence rate of 4-7%. Anxiety can be caused by a number of factors typically classified as environmental surroundings and genetic.

In the past few decades anxiety research has significantly increased. In 2000 there were approximately 430 trials looking at anxiety and by 2015 to over 1,000. This has allowed medical professionals to develop and improve accurate diagnosis and treatments in patients suffering from the condition.

Anxiety is normal in uncomfortable environments or stressful situations. However, some individuals experience intense and persistent amounts of anxiety which needs to be kept under control. Treatments include pharmaceuticals such as SSRIs, benzodiazepines, pregabalin and gabapentin. Other therapies include CBT, acceptance and commitment therapy, and motivational interviewing.

Trip has all the latest evidence relating to treatments for anxiety, this includes systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, controlled trials, evidence-based synopses, case reports and clinical Q&As.

Top results for anxiety

241. Self-help treatment of anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis and meta-regression of effects and potential moderators

Self-help treatment of anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis and meta-regression of effects and potential moderators Self-help treatment of anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis and meta-regression of effects and potential moderators Self-help treatment of anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis and meta-regression of effects and potential moderators Haug T, Nordgreen T, Ost LG, Havik OE CRD summary This review concluded that self-help treatment was effective for the treatment of anxiety disorders (...) , and should be provided as part of stepped care treatment models in community services. In view of the uncertain quality of the evidence base and limitations of the review process, a degree of caution might be required to interpret these conclusions. Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of self-help treatment for anxiety disorders and identify potential moderating factors that influence the effect of self-help treatment. Searching PubMed, Web of Knowledge, PsycINFO and Cochrane Central Register

DARE.2012

242. Long working hours are associated with incident depressive and anxiety symptoms in women

Long working hours are associated with incident depressive and anxiety symptoms in women Long working hours are associated with incident depressive and anxiety symptoms in women | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search (...) for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Long working hours are associated with incident depressive and anxiety symptoms in women Article Text Aetiology Long working hours are associated with incident depressive and anxiety symptoms in women Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available for this article. Question Question: Are long working hours

Evidence-Based Mental Health2012

243. The cost-effectiveness of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy and solution-focused therapy in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders during a one-year follow-up

The cost-effectiveness of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy and solution-focused therapy in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders during a one-year follow-up The cost-effectiveness of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy and solution-focused therapy in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders during a one-year follow-up The cost-effectiveness of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy and solution-focused therapy in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders (...) of two short-term psychotherapies, for the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders. The authors concluded that the interventions were comparable in effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, but short-term psychodynamic therapy appeared to be more cost-effective than solution-focused therapy. The methods were good, and the results were adequately reported. There were some limitations, and the results may not be generalisable to other settings, but the authors' conclusions seem appropriate. Type

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2012

244. The Strongest Families intervention is more effective than usual care in children with mild or moderate oppositional, attention or anxiety disorders

The Strongest Families intervention is more effective than usual care in children with mild or moderate oppositional, attention or anxiety disorders The Strongest Families intervention is more effective than usual care in children with mild or moderate oppositional, attention or anxiety disorders | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers (...) of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here The Strongest Families intervention is more effective than usual care in children with mild or moderate oppositional, attention or anxiety disorders Article Text Therapeutics The Strongest Families intervention is more

Evidence-Based Mental Health2012

245. Online cognitive-behaviour therapy is similarly effective to clinic-based CBT for reducing adolescent anxiety

Online cognitive-behaviour therapy is similarly effective to clinic-based CBT for reducing adolescent anxiety Online cognitive-behaviour therapy is similarly effective to clinic-based CBT for reducing adolescent anxiety | Evidence-Based Mental Health This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password (...) ? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Online cognitive-behaviour therapy is similarly effective to clinic-based CBT for reducing adolescent anxiety Article Text Therapeutics Online cognitive-behaviour therapy is similarly effective to clinic-based CBT for reducing adolescent anxiety Statistics from Altmetric.com

Evidence-Based Mental Health2012

246. Cognitive behavioural intervention for adults with anxiety complications of asthma: prospective randomised trial

Cognitive behavioural intervention for adults with anxiety complications of asthma: prospective randomised trial Cognitive behavioural intervention for adults with anxiety complications of asthma: prospective randomised trial Cognitive behavioural intervention for adults with anxiety complications of asthma: prospective randomised trial Parry GD, Cooper CL, Moore JM, Yadegarfar G, Campbell MJ, Esmonde L, Morice AH, Hutchcroft BJ Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic (...) Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the EQ-5D questionnaire (including the visual analogue scale), the Asthma Bother Profile, and the Asthma Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (AMHLC). Health utility values, for the EQ-5D data, were derived using general population valuations of the health states. All measures were from the patient-completed questionnaires at baseline, after treatment, and at follow-up. Measure of benefit: The measure of benefit was improvement in the health-related quality

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2012

247. D-cycloserine augmentation of behavioral therapy for the treatment of anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis

D-cycloserine augmentation of behavioral therapy for the treatment of anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis D-cycloserine augmentation of behavioral therapy for the treatment of anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis D-cycloserine augmentation of behavioral therapy for the treatment of anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis Bontempo A, Panza KE, Bloch MH CRD summary The authors concluded that D-cycloserine seemed to be an effective addition to behavioural therapy for anxiety disorders. Given the unknown (...) risk of bias and the lack of evidence, the authors' conclusions seem overly strong. Authors' objectives To evaluate the efficacy of the addition of D-cycloserine to behavioural therapy, for anxiety disorders. Searching PubMed, PsycINFO, and Scopus were searched to June 2011, with no language restrictions. Search terms were reported. Reference lists of related reviews, meta-analyses and included articles, were handsearched for further studies. Study selection Eligible studies were placebo randomised

DARE.2012

248. Psychological treatment of dental anxiety among adults

Psychological treatment of dental anxiety among adults Psychological treatment of dental anxiety among adults Psychological treatment of dental anxiety among adults Wide Boman U, Hakeberg M, Carlsson V, Eriksson M, Liljegren A, Sjögren P, Westin M, Strandell A Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Wide Boman U, Hakeberg M, Carlsson V, Eriksson M (...) , Liljegren A, Sjögren P, Westin M, Strandell A. Psychological treatment of dental anxiety among adults. Gothenburg: The Regional Health Technology Assessment Centre (HTA-centrum). HTA-rapport 2012:46. 2012 Authors' objectives Is BT a more effective treatment for dental phobia or dental anxiety/fear, concerning reduction of dental anxiety and acceptance of conventional dental treatment, than information, pharmacological sedation, experience of dental treatment under general anesthesia or placebo

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2012

249. Psychotherapy interventions for depression, anxiety or grief in the community health service setting: A systematic review

Psychotherapy interventions for depression, anxiety or grief in the community health service setting: A systematic review Home - Monash Health Find a Location Latest news We are delighted to begin construction on the Victorian Heart Hospital, Australia’s first dedicated state-of-the art cardiac facility. Your health Protect your health and safety while you travel this holiday season by planning ahead and preparing for the unexpected. Our children’s hospital Monash Children’s Hospital is one

Monash Health Evidence Reviews2012

250. Psychological interventions for alcohol misuse among people with co-occurring depression or anxiety disorders: a systematic review

Psychological interventions for alcohol misuse among people with co-occurring depression or anxiety disorders: a systematic review Psychological interventions for alcohol misuse among people with co-occurring depression or anxiety disorders: a systematic review Psychological interventions for alcohol misuse among people with co-occurring depression or anxiety disorders: a systematic review Baker AL, Thornton LK, Hiles S, Hides L, Lubman DI CRD summary This review concluded that there was some (...) evidence that cognitive behavioural therapy and motivational interviewing were effective in the treatment of co-occurring alcohol misuse and depressive or anxiety disorders. The review was limited by the available evidence. The authors' cautious conclusions are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To determine the efficacy of psychological interventions to reduce alcohol misuse in patients with co-occurring depressive or anxiety disorders. Searching PubMed and PsycINFO were searched from

DARE.2012

251. Interventions for treating anxiety after stroke.

Interventions for treating anxiety after stroke. BACKGROUND: Approximately 20% of stroke patients experience anxiety at some point after stroke. OBJECTIVES: To determine if any treatment for anxiety after stroke decreases the proportion of patients with anxiety disorders or symptoms, and to determine the effect of treatment on quality of life, disability, depression, social participation, risk of death or caregiver burden. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the trials register of the Cochrane Stroke (...) intervention in patients with stroke where the treatment of anxiety was an outcome were eligible. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently extracted data for analysis. We performed a narrative review. A meta-analysis was planned but not carried out as studies were not of sufficient quality to warrant doing so. MAIN RESULTS: We included two trials (three interventions) involving 175 participants with co-morbid anxiety and depression in the review. Both trials used the Hamilton Anxiety

Cochrane2011

252. Randomized controlled trial of brief cognitive behavioral intervention for depression and anxiety symptoms preoperatively in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery

Randomized controlled trial of brief cognitive behavioral intervention for depression and anxiety symptoms preoperatively in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery 21621227 2011 08 16 2011 10 13 2011 08 16 1097-685X 142 3 2011 Sep The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery J. Thorac. Cardiovasc. Surg. Randomized controlled trial of brief cognitive behavioral intervention for depression and anxiety symptoms preoperatively in patients undergoing coronary (...) artery bypass graft surgery. e109-15 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2011.02.046 The goal of this study was to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of a brief, tailored cognitive-behavioral intervention for patients with symptoms of preoperative depression or anxiety before undergoing a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) operation. Patients were recruited from a university teaching hospital between February 2007 and May 2009. Patients were randomly assigned to receive treatment as usual (TAU) or a cognitive behavioral

EvidenceUpdates2011

253. Cognitive therapy vs interpersonal psychotherapy in social anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial

Cognitive therapy vs interpersonal psychotherapy in social anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial 21727253 2011 07 05 2011 09 13 2016 11 22 1538-3636 68 7 2011 Jul Archives of general psychiatry Arch. Gen. Psychiatry Cognitive therapy vs interpersonal psychotherapy in social anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial. 692-700 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.67 Cognitive therapy (CT) focuses on the modification of biased information processing and dysfunctional beliefs of social (...) anxiety disorder (SAD). Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) aims to change problematic interpersonal behavior patterns that may have an important role in the maintenance of SAD. No direct comparisons of the treatments for SAD in an outpatient setting exist. To compare the efficacy of CT, IPT, and a waiting-list control (WLC) condition. Randomized controlled trial. Two academic outpatient treatment sites. Patients Of 254 potential participants screened, 117 had a primary diagnosis of SAD and were

EvidenceUpdates2011

254. The effects of short interactive animation video information on preanesthetic anxiety, knowledge, and interview time: a randomized controlled trial

The effects of short interactive animation video information on preanesthetic anxiety, knowledge, and interview time: a randomized controlled trial 21346166 2011 05 26 2011 08 09 2011 05 26 1526-7598 112 6 2011 Jun Anesthesia and analgesia Anesth. Analg. The effects of short interactive animation video information on preanesthetic anxiety, knowledge, and interview time: a randomized controlled trial. 1314-8 10.1213/ANE.0b013e31820f8c18 We designed an interactive animated video that provides (...) a basic explanation-including the risks, benefits, and alternatives-of anesthetic procedures. We hypothesized that this video would improve patient understanding of anesthesia, reduce anxiety, and shorten the interview time. Two hundred eleven patients scheduled for cancer surgery under general anesthesia or combined general and epidural anesthesia, who were admitted at least 1 day before the surgery, were randomly assigned to the video group (n = 106) or the no-video group (n = 105). The patients

EvidenceUpdates2011

255. Mind-body interventions during pregnancy for preventing or treating women's anxiety.

Mind-body interventions during pregnancy for preventing or treating women's anxiety. BACKGROUND: Anxiety during pregnancy is a common problem. Anxiety and stress could have consequences on the course of the pregnancy and the later development of the child. Anxiety responds well to treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and/or medication. Non-pharmacological interventions such as mind-body interventions, known to decrease anxiety in several clinical situations, might be offered (...) for treating and preventing anxiety during pregnancy. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits of mind-body interventions during pregnancy in preventing or treating women's anxiety and in influencing perinatal outcomes. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 November 2010), MEDLINE (1950 to 30 November 2010), EMBASE (1974 to 30 November 2010), the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) (1 December 2010), ClinicalTrials.gov

Cochrane2011

256. Effects of progressive muscle relaxation on state anxiety and subjective well-being in people with schizophrenia: a randomized controlled trial

Effects of progressive muscle relaxation on state anxiety and subjective well-being in people with schizophrenia: a randomized controlled trial 21402653 2011 05 10 2011 09 12 2011 05 10 1477-0873 25 6 2011 Jun Clinical rehabilitation Clin Rehabil Effects of progressive muscle relaxation on state anxiety and subjective well-being in people with schizophrenia: a randomized controlled trial. 567-75 10.1177/0269215510395633 To examine the efficacy of a single progressive muscle relaxation session (...) compared with a control condition on state anxiety, psychological stress, fatigue and subjective well-being in patients with schizophrenia. Randomized controlled trial. An acute inpatient care unit of an University Psychiatric Centre. Sixty-four out of 88 eligible patients with schizophrenia. Patients were randomly assigned to either a single progressive muscle relaxation session during 25 minutes or a resting control condition with the opportunity to read for an equal amount of time. Before and after

EvidenceUpdates2011

257. Internet-based cognitive-behavioural therapy for severe health anxiety: randomised controlled trial

Internet-based cognitive-behavioural therapy for severe health anxiety: randomised controlled trial 21357882 2011 03 01 2011 06 14 2011 10 17 1472-1465 198 3 2011 Mar The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science Br J Psychiatry Internet-based cognitive-behavioural therapy for severe health anxiety: randomised controlled trial. 230-6 10.1192/bjp.bp.110.086843 Hypochondriasis, characterised by severe health anxiety, is a common condition associated with functional disability (...) with an attention control condition (n = 41) for people with hypochondriasis. The primary outcome measure was the Health Anxiety Inventory. This trial is registrated with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00828152). Participants receiving internet-based CBT made large and superior improvements compared with the control group on measures of health anxiety (between-group Cohen's d range 1.52-1.62). Internet-based CBT is an efficacious treatment for hypochondriasis that has the potential to increase accessibility

EvidenceUpdates2011

258. Disorder-specific impact of coordinated anxiety learning and management treatment for anxiety disorders in primary care

Disorder-specific impact of coordinated anxiety learning and management treatment for anxiety disorders in primary care 21464362 2011 04 05 2011 06 06 2016 11 22 1538-3636 68 4 2011 Apr Archives of general psychiatry Arch. Gen. Psychiatry Disorder-specific impact of coordinated anxiety learning and management treatment for anxiety disorders in primary care. 378-88 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.25 Anxiety disorders commonly present in primary care, where evidence-based mental health treatments (...) often are unavailable or suboptimally delivered. To compare evidence-based treatment for anxiety disorders with usual care (UC) in primary care for principal and comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A randomized controlled trial comparing the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) intervention with UC at baseline and at 6-, 12-, and 18-month follow-up assessments. Seventeen US primary

EvidenceUpdates2011 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

259. The effect of music therapy on physiological signs of anxiety in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support

The effect of music therapy on physiological signs of anxiety in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support 21323778 2011 03 09 2011 06 27 2011 03 09 1365-2702 20 7-8 2011 Apr Journal of clinical nursing J Clin Nurs The effect of music therapy on physiological signs of anxiety in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support. 1026-34 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2010.03434.x The aim of this study was to investigate if relaxing music is an effective method of reducing the physiological signs (...) of anxiety in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support. Few studies have focused on the effect of music on physiological signs of anxiety in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support. A study-case-control, experimental repeated measures design was used. Sixty patients aged 18-70 years, receiving mechanical ventilatory support and hospitalised in the intensive care unit, were taken as a convenience sample. Participants were randomised to a control group or intervention group, who received

EvidenceUpdates2011

260. A randomised controlled trial of the effect of music therapy and verbal relaxation on chemotherapy-induced anxiety

A randomised controlled trial of the effect of music therapy and verbal relaxation on chemotherapy-induced anxiety 21385249 2011 03 09 2011 06 27 2011 10 18 1365-2702 20 7-8 2011 Apr Journal of clinical nursing J Clin Nurs A randomised controlled trial of the effect of music therapy and verbal relaxation on chemotherapy-induced anxiety. 988-99 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2010.03525.x To determine the effect of music therapy and verbal relaxation on state anxiety and anxiety-induced physiological (...) manifestations among patients with cancer before and after chemotherapy. Cancer and its treatment provoke a series of changes in the emotional sphere of the patient's anxiety. Music therapy and verbal relaxation had reported the anxiety reduction effect on patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Few studies have been undertaken comparing music therapy and verbal relaxation in differentiating high-normal state anxiety subsample. A randomised controlled trial and permuted block design were used

EvidenceUpdates2011