Latest & greatest articles for anticoagulation

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Top results for anticoagulation

161. Unplanned pregnancy on a direct oral anticoagulant (Rivaroxaban): A warning

Unplanned pregnancy on a direct oral anticoagulant (Rivaroxaban): A warning 27512489 2016 08 11 2018 11 13 1753-495X 9 1 2016 Mar Obstetric medicine Obstet Med Unplanned pregnancy on a direct oral anticoagulant (Rivaroxaban): A warning. 40-2 10.1177/1753495X15621814 Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs or NOACs -non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants), as the name suggests, are oral anticoagulants with a direct inhibitory action either against factor X or factor II (thrombin). Pregnant women were (...) ; Lincoln County Hospital, Lincoln, UK. Neal R R UEA Medical School, Norwich, UK. Myers O O Department of Haematology, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester, UK. Ruparelia M M Department of Haematology, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester, UK. eng Journal Article 2015 12 24 England Obstet Med 101464191 1753-495X Anticoagulants Rivaroxaban direct oral anticoagulants heavy menstrual bleeding pregnancy 2015 10 09 2015 11 18 2017 03 01 2016 8 12 6 0 2016 8 12 6 0 2016 8 12 6 1 ppublish 27512489 10.1177

Obstetric medicine2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

162. Use of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants (NOAC) in Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation

Use of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants (NOAC) in Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation Use of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants (NOAC) in Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation - Province of British Columbia Search default_collection default_frontend MENU theme_1_collection theme_1_frontend theme_1_collection theme_1_frontend British Columbians & Our Governments theme_3_collection theme_3_frontend theme_3_collection theme_3_frontend Health theme_2_collection theme_2_frontend (...) theme_13_frontend theme_13_collection theme_13_frontend Employment, Business & Economic Development theme_14_collection theme_14_frontend theme_14_collection theme_14_frontend Tourism & Immigration theme_15_collection theme_15_frontend theme_15_collection theme_15_frontend Family & Social Supports default_collection default_frontend default_collection default_frontend Data Section Navigation Use of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants (NOAC) in Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation Effective Date: April 1

Clinical Practice Guidelines and Protocols in British Columbia2015

163. Oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonist therapy

Oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonist therapy File name: 20151202 AS OAC v1.0.docx Version: 1.0 Date: 22 January 2016 Produced by: SHTG Page: 1 Review date: December 2017 Advice Statement 003/2015 December 2015 Is patient self-monitoring (including self- testing and self-management) of oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonist therapy safe, efficacious and cost-effective? This advice has been produced following completion of evidence note 57 by Healthcare Improvement Scotland (...) then decides on dose adjustment. In patient self-management the patient not only performs the blood sampling and analysis but also makes any vitamin K antagonist dose adjustment required. Clinical effectiveness and safety of anticoagulation monitoring ? Meta-analyses of data from mainly low quality randomised controlled trials in patients receiving long-term oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists consistently report that self-monitoring of INR reduces the incidence of thromboembolic events

SHTG Advice Statements2015

164. The future of anticoagulation management in atrial fibrillation in Europe: An assessment of today's challenges with recommendations for the future

The future of anticoagulation management in atrial fibrillation in Europe: An assessment of today's challenges with recommendations for the future 28083378 2018 11 13 2162-8254 5 2 2015 Nov 30 Rand health quarterly Rand Health Q The future of anticoagulation management in atrial fibrillation in Europe: An assessment of today's challenges with recommendations for the future. 2 Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of cardiac arrhythmia, affecting approximately 1-2 per cent (...) that available knowledge is applied optimally to benefit patients so that opportunities to prevent AF-related stroke are not missed. The aims of this project were to assess the current landscape and explore the direction of future developments in AF management in Europe, with a focus on the use of anticoagulants in the prevention of AF-related stroke. Through rapid evidence assessment, key informant interviews, PESTLE analysis and the development and exploration of future scenarios, we have developed sets

Rand health quarterly2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

165. Post-Operative Anticoagulation of Elderly Surgical Patients with Impaired Renal Function: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

Post-Operative Anticoagulation of Elderly Surgical Patients with Impaired Renal Function: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Post-Operative Anticoagulation of Elderly Surgical Patients with Impaired Renal Function: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Post-Operative Anticoagulation of Elderly Surgical Patients with Impaired Renal Function: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Post-Operative Anticoagulation of Elderly Surgical Patients with Impaired (...) Renal Function: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Published on: November 9, 2015 Project Number: RA0816-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Reference List Result type: Report Question What is the comparative clinical effectiveness of various low weight molecular heparins for post-operative anticoagulation of elderly (aged 65 years) surgical patients with impaired renal function? What is the comparative clinical effectiveness of unfractionated heparin versus low weight molecular

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review2015

166. Antidote for Factor Xa Anticoagulants.

Antidote for Factor Xa Anticoagulants. Antidote for Factor Xa Anticoagulants. - PubMed - NCBI Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search Result Filters Format Summary Summary (text) Abstract Abstract (text) MEDLINE XML PMID List Apply Choose Destination File Clipboard Collections E-mail Order My Bibliography Citation manager Format Create File 1 selected item: 26559124 Format MeSH and Other Data E-mail Subject Additional text E-mail Add (...) to Clipboard Add to Collections Order articles Add to My Bibliography Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Create File 2015 Dec 17;373(25):2471-2. doi: 10.1056/NEJMe1513258. Epub 2015 Nov 11. Antidote for Factor Xa Anticoagulants. 1 . 1 From the Hematology Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School - both in Boston. Comment on [N Engl J Med. 2015] PMID: 26559124 DOI: [Indexed for MEDLINE] Free full text Publication types MeSH terms Substances Full Text

NEJM2015

167. A feasibility study to inform the design of a randomised controlled trial to identify the most clinically effective and cost-effective length of Anticoagulation with Low-molecular-weight heparin In the treatment of Cancer-Associated Thrombosis (ALICAT)

A feasibility study to inform the design of a randomised controlled trial to identify the most clinically effective and cost-effective length of Anticoagulation with Low-molecular-weight heparin In the treatment of Cancer-Associated Thrombosis (ALICAT) A feasibility study to inform the design of a randomised controlled trial to identify the most clinically effective and cost-effective length of Anticoagulation with Low-molecular-weight heparin In the treatment of Cancer-Associated Thrombosis (...) and venous thromboembolism to a randomised controlled trial exploring the most effective way to manage CAT after 6 months’ anticoagulation therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , & . Simon I Noble, 1 ,2 ,* Annmarie Nelson, 2 David Fitzmaurice, 3 Marie-Jet Bekkers, 4 Jessica Baillie, 5 Stephanie Sivell, 2 Joanna Canham, 1 Joanna D Smith, 1 Angela Casbard, 1 Ander Cohen, 6 David Cohen, 7 Jessica Evans, 1 Kate Fletcher, 8 Miriam Johnson, 9 Anthony

NIHR HTA programme2015

168. Do patients with a clinically suspected subsegmental pulmonary embolism need anticoagulation therapy?

Do patients with a clinically suspected subsegmental pulmonary embolism need anticoagulation therapy? BestBets: Do patients with a clinically suspected subsegmental pulmonary embolism need anticoagulation therapy? Do patients with a clinically suspected subsegmental pulmonary embolism need anticoagulation therapy? Report By: Chris Morgan, Hyun Choi - TBC Institution: University of Manchester, Manchester, UK and Emergency Department, Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust, London, UK Date Submitted (...) : 26th August 2015 Last Modified: 26th August 2015 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [a symptomatic patient with an isolated subsegmental pulmonary embolism] does [anticoagulation therapy or no treatment] lead to [lower rates of mortality and recurrent venous thromboembolism?] Clinical Scenario A 62-year-old gentleman attends your Emergency Department with shortness of breath and chest pain. You suspect a pulmonary embolism (PE) and request a CT pulmonary angiogram. The radiologist

BestBETS2015

169. Targeted Anti-Anticoagulants.

Targeted Anti-Anticoagulants. Targeted Anti-Anticoagulants. - PubMed - NCBI Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search Result Filters Format Summary Summary (text) Abstract Abstract (text) MEDLINE XML PMID List Apply Choose Destination File Clipboard Collections E-mail Order My Bibliography Citation manager Format Create File 1 selected item: 26095632 Format MeSH and Other Data E-mail Subject Additional text E-mail Add to Clipboard Add (...) to Collections Order articles Add to My Bibliography Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Create File 2015 Aug 6;373(6):569-71. doi: 10.1056/NEJMe1506600. Epub 2015 Jun 22. Targeted Anti-Anticoagulants. 1 . 1 From Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center - both in Boston. Comment on [N Engl J Med. 2015] PMID: 26095632 DOI: [Indexed for MEDLINE] Publication types MeSH terms Substances Full Text Sources Medical PubMed Commons 0 comments How to cite

NEJM2015

170. Treating deep vein thrombosis: novel ways to anticoagulate

Treating deep vein thrombosis: novel ways to anticoagulate Treating deep vein thrombosis: novel ways to anticoagulate - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By August 3, 2015 // A blog written by retired GP, Dr Lynda Ware, for clinicians. The novel oral anticoagulants – or NOACs – are the new kids on the block in anticoagulation. They appear to be as effective as warfarin but with a better safety profile. A published in June 2015 (1) explores the role of NOACs in the treatment (...) , with high quality evidence and a low risk of bias. A meta-analysis of the three studies (7596 participants) comparing oral DTIs with standard anticoagulation showed no difference in the rate of recurrent VTE, recurrent DVT, fatal and non-fatal PE or all-cause mortality. Oral DTIs were, however, associated with a reduced risk of bleeding. A meta-analysis of the eight studies (16356 participants) comparing oral Factor Xa inhibitors with standard anticoagulation showed no difference in the rate

Evidently Cochrane2015

172. Peri-procedural management of patients taking oral anticoagulants.

Peri-procedural management of patients taking oral anticoagulants. The use of oral anticoagulants is becoming increasingly common. For many years warfarin was the main oral anticoagulant available, but therapeutic options have expanded with the introduction of oral direct thrombin (dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (apixaban, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban). Management of patients taking any oral anticoagulant in the peri-procedural period poses a challenge to medical and surgical providers (...) because of the competing risks of thrombosis and hemorrhage. Bridging therapy has been used to minimize time without anticoagulation when warfarin is interrupted for invasive procedures, but validated strategies based on high quality data are lacking. Existing data suggest that the use of bridging therapy may increase the risk of bleeding for some patients without reducing the risk of thrombosis. Clinical trials are currently under way to answer these questions. Because the half lives and time

BMJ2015

173. Six Months vs Extended Oral Anticoagulation After a First Episode of Pulmonary Embolism: The PADIS-PE Randomized Clinical Trial.

Six Months vs Extended Oral Anticoagulation After a First Episode of Pulmonary Embolism: The PADIS-PE Randomized Clinical Trial. 26151264 2015 07 08 2015 07 23 2016 10 17 1538-3598 314 1 2015 Jul 07 JAMA JAMA Six Months vs Extended Oral Anticoagulation After a First Episode of Pulmonary Embolism: The PADIS-PE Randomized Clinical Trial. 31-40 10.1001/jama.2015.7046 The optimal duration of anticoagulation after a first episode of unprovoked pulmonary embolism is uncertain. To determine (...) of anticoagulant treatment, an additional 18 months of treatment with warfarin reduced the composite outcome of recurrent venous thrombosis and major bleeding compared with placebo. However, benefit was not maintained after discontinuation of anticoagulation therapy. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00740883. Couturaud Francis F Département de Médecine Interne et Pneumologie, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Brest, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, and EA 3878, CIC INSERM 1412, Brest, France2Groupe

JAMA2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

174. Antidote Treatments for the Reversal of Direct Oral Anticoagulants

Antidote Treatments for the Reversal of Direct Oral Anticoagulants Issue 138 ? June 2015 Issues in Emerging Health Technologies 1 Antidote Treatments for the Reversal of Direct Oral Anticoagulants Summary ? There are three intravenous antidotes currently under development for the reversal of direct oral anticoagulants. ? Idarucizumab is a humanized, monoclonal, antibody fragment that reverses the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran. Andexanet alfa is a modified recombinant factor Xa molecule (...) that reverses oral direct (e.g., apixaban, edoxaban, rivaroxaban) and injectable indirect (e.g., enoxaparin, fondaparinux) factor Xa inhibitors. Aripazine is a small, synthetic molecule with potentially universal anticoagulant reversal activity. ? Clinical evidence to support the use of individual antidotes is currently limited to phase 1 and phase 2 trials in healthy volunteers. All three antidotes were well tolerated during these studies and no pro-coagulant activity was observed. Phase 3 trials

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review2015

175. Neurologic Complications In Infective Endocarditis: To Anticoagulate Or Not To Anticoagulate

Neurologic Complications In Infective Endocarditis: To Anticoagulate Or Not To Anticoagulate Neurologic Complications In Infective Endocarditis: To Anticoagulate Or Not To Anticoagulate | Clinical Correlations Neurologic Complications In Infective Endocarditis: To Anticoagulate Or Not To Anticoagulate July 10, 2015 By Shannon Chiu, MD Peer Reviewed The annual incidence of infective endocarditis (IE) [1-2]. Neurologic complications are the most severe and frequent [3-4]. They consist of 1 (...) ) ischemic infarction secondary to septic emboli from the valvular vegetation, which can eventually undergo hemorrhagic transformation; 2) focal vasculitis/cerebritis from septic emboli obstructing the vascular lumen, which can then develop into brain abscess or meningoencephalitis; 3) mycotic aneurysm [5]. Amongst these complications, stroke is the most common and is the presenting feature in 50-75% of patients [6]. To date, an ongoing debate amongst physicians is the appropriateness of anticoagulation

Clinical Correlations2015

176. Antidote Treatments for the Reversal of Direct Oral Anticoagulants

Antidote Treatments for the Reversal of Direct Oral Anticoagulants Antidote Treatments for the Reversal of Direct Oral Anticoagulants | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Antidote Treatments for the Reversal of Direct Oral Anticoagulants Antidote Treatments for the Reversal of Direct Oral Anticoagulants Published on: June 23, 2015 Project Number: EH0028 Product Line: Issue: 138 Result type: Report Summary There are three intravenous antidotes currently under development for the reversal (...) of direct oral anticoagulants. Idarucizumab is a humanized, monoclonal, antibody fragment that reverses the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran. Andexanet alfa is a modified recombinant factor Xa molecule that reverses oral direct (e.g., apixaban, edoxaban, rivaroxaban) and injectable indirect (e.g., enoxaparin, fondaparinux) factor Xa inhibitors. Aripazine is a small, synthetic molecule with potentially universal anticoagulant reversal activity. Clinical evidence to support the use of individual

CADTH - Issues in Emerging Health Technologies2015

177. Perioperative Bridging Anticoagulation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

Perioperative Bridging Anticoagulation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation. BACKGROUND: It is uncertain whether bridging anticoagulation is necessary for patients with atrial fibrillation who need an interruption in warfarin treatment for an elective operation or other elective invasive procedure. We hypothesized that forgoing bridging anticoagulation would be noninferior to bridging with low-molecular-weight heparin for the prevention of perioperative arterial thromboembolism and would (...) be superior to bridging with respect to major bleeding. METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in which, after perioperative interruption of warfarin therapy, patients were randomly assigned to receive bridging anticoagulation therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin (100 IU of dalteparin per kilogram of body weight) or matching placebo administered subcutaneously twice daily, from 3 days before the procedure until 24 hours before the procedure and then for 5 to 10

NEJM2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

178. Duration of Triple Therapy in Patients Requiring Oral Anticoagulation After Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation: The ISAR-TRIPLE Trial

Duration of Triple Therapy in Patients Requiring Oral Anticoagulation After Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation: The ISAR-TRIPLE Trial 25908066 2015 04 24 2015 07 09 2016 02 12 1558-3597 65 16 2015 Apr 28 Journal of the American College of Cardiology J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. Duration of Triple Therapy in Patients Requiring Oral Anticoagulation After Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation: The ISAR-TRIPLE Trial. 1619-29 10.1016/j.jacc.2015.02.050 S0735-1097(15)00801-3 Patients receiving oral anticoagulation (...) =0.44). Six weeks of triple therapy was not superior to 6 months with respect to net clinical outcomes. These results suggest that physicians should weigh the trade-off between ischemic and bleeding risk when choosing the shorter or longer duration of triple therapy. (Triple Therapy in Patients on Oral Anticoagulation After Drug Eluting Stent Implantation [ISAR-TRIPLE]; NCT00776633). Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Fiedler

EvidenceUpdates2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

179. Effect of a retrievable inferior vena cava filter plus anticoagulation vs anticoagulation alone on risk of recurrent pulmonary embolism: a randomized clinical trial.

Effect of a retrievable inferior vena cava filter plus anticoagulation vs anticoagulation alone on risk of recurrent pulmonary embolism: a randomized clinical trial. 25919526 2015 04 29 2015 05 06 2016 10 17 1538-3598 313 16 2015 Apr 28 JAMA JAMA Effect of a retrievable inferior vena cava filter plus anticoagulation vs anticoagulation alone on risk of recurrent pulmonary embolism: a randomized clinical trial. 1627-35 10.1001/jama.2015.3780 Although retrievable inferior vena cava filters (...) are frequently used in addition to anticoagulation in patients with acute venous thromboembolism, their benefit-risk ratio is unclear. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of retrievable vena cava filters plus anticoagulation vs anticoagulation alone for preventing pulmonary embolism recurrence in patients presenting with acute pulmonary embolism and a high risk of recurrence. Randomized, open-label, blinded end point trial (PREPIC2) with 6-month follow-up conducted from August 2006 to January 2013

JAMA2015 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

180. Anticoagulant Drugs Do Not Increase Risk of Postoperative Bleeding after Implant Placement

Anticoagulant Drugs Do Not Increase Risk of Postoperative Bleeding after Implant Placement UTCAT2875, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Anticoagulant Drugs Do Not Increase Risk of Postoperative Bleeding after Implant Placement Clinical Question Will a patient on anticoagulant drugs who is receiving a dental implant have a higher risk of postoperative bleeding than a patient who discontinues the medication (...) ? Clinical Bottom Line Discontinuation of oral anticoagulant drugs is “not recommended for minor oral surgery, such as ….implant placement, provided that this does not involve autogenous bone grafts, extensive flaps or osteotomy preparations extending outside the bony envelope.” Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Madrid/2009 19 Studies Total Systematic Review Key results In this systemic review

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2015