Latest & greatest articles for anticoagulation

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Top results for anticoagulation

123. Long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides (superwarfarins) toxicity - emergency management

Long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides (superwarfarins) toxicity - emergency management

2017 DynaMed Plus

124. Periprocedural Management of Anticoagulation in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation

Periprocedural Management of Anticoagulation in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation EXPERT CONSENSUS DECISION PATHWAY 2017 ACC Expert Consensus Decision Pathway for Periprocedural Management of Anticoagulation in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation A Report of the American College of Cardiology Clinical Expert Consensus Document Task Force Periprocedural Management of Anticoagulation Writing Committee John U. Doherty, MD, FACC, Chair Ty J. Gluckman, MD, FACC William J (...) Piana, MD, FACC John Puskas, MD, FACC Karol E. Watson, MD, FACC Barbara S. Wiggins, PHARMD, AACC This document was approved by the American College of Cardiology Board of Trustees in November 2016. TheAmericanCollegeofCardiologyFoundationrequeststhatthisdocumentbecitedasfollows:DohertyJU,GluckmanTJ,HuckerWJ,JanuzziJr.JL, Ortel TL, Saxonhouse SJ, Spinler SA. 2017 ACC expert consensus decision pathway for periprocedural management of anticoagulation in patients with nonvalvular atrial ?brillation. J

2017 American College of Cardiology

125. Management of Bleeding in Patients on Oral Anticoagulants

Management of Bleeding in Patients on Oral Anticoagulants EXPERT CONSENSUS DECISION PATHWAY 2017 ACC Expert Consensus Decision PathwayonManagementofBleeding in Patients on Oral Anticoagulants A Report of the American College of Cardiology Task Force on Expert Consensus Decision Pathways Writing Committee Gordon F. Tomaselli, MD, FACC, Chair Kenneth W. Mahaffey, MD, FACC, Vice Chair Adam Cuker, MD, MS Paul P. Dobesh, PHARMD John U. Doherty, MD, FACC John W. Eikelboom, MBBS Roberta Florido, MD (...) on management of bleeding in patients on oral anticoagulants: a report of the American College of Cardiology Task Force on Expert Consensus Decision Pathways. J Am Coll Cardiol 2017;70:XXX–XX. Copies: This document is available on the World Wide Web site of the American College of Cardiology (www.acc.org). For copies of this document, please contact Elsevier Inc. Reprint Department via fax (212) 633-3820 or e-mail (reprints@elsevier.com). Permissions: Multiple copies, modi?cation, alteration, enhancement

2017 American College of Cardiology

126. Observational study: In patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and concomitant atrial fibrillation, optimal timing of reinitiating anticoagulants may be 7?8 weeks after ICH

Observational study: In patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and concomitant atrial fibrillation, optimal timing of reinitiating anticoagulants may be 7?8 weeks after ICH In patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and concomitant atrial fibrillation, optimal timing of reinitiating anticoagulants may be 7–8 weeks after ICH | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser (...) atrial fibrillation, optimal timing of reinitiating anticoagulants may be 7–8 weeks after ICH Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Observational study In patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and concomitant atrial fibrillation, optimal timing of reinitiating anticoagulants may be 7–8 weeks after ICH Catharina JM Klijn , Floris HBM Schreuder Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Pennlert J, et al . Optimal timing of anticoagulant treatment after intracerebral haemorrhage in patients

2017 Evidence-Based Medicine

127. Cohort study: Resumption of anticoagulation after major bleeding decreases the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation

Cohort study: Resumption of anticoagulation after major bleeding decreases the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation Resumption of anticoagulation after major bleeding decreases the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log (...) in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Resumption of anticoagulation after major bleeding decreases the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation Article Text

2017 Evidence-Based Medicine

128. Management of Patients on Non?Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in the Acute Care and Periprocedural Setting: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Full Text available with Trip Pro

Management of Patients on Non?Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in the Acute Care and Periprocedural Setting: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association e604 March 7, 2017 Circulation. 2017;135:e604–e633. DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000477 ABSTRACT: Non–vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are now widely used as alternatives to warfarin for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and management of venous thromboembolism. In clinical practice, there is still widespread (...) , and prescriptions for long-term anticoagulation will climb. Anticoagulated patients are vulnerable to spontane- ous, traumatic and perioperative bleeding. Warfarin is a vitamin K antagonist (VKA) that has been used for decades to prevent and treat arterial and venous thromboem- bolism (VTE). More recently, 4 non–vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been approved in the United States as alternatives to warfarin for prevention of stroke resulting from nonvalvular AF (NVAF), and prevention

2017 American Heart Association

129. Oral anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation

Oral anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation '); } else { document.write(' '); } ACE | Oral anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation Search > > Oral anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation - Oral anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation Published on 20 November 2017 This Appropriate Care Guide (ACG) highlights the importance of appropriate anticoagulation and provides clinicians with recommendations on when to initiate anticoagulation, how to select between warfarin and non-vitamin K antagonists (...) , and appropriate follow-up and monitoring of patients. A supplementary guide on how to switch between agents has also been provided. Download the PDF below to access the full ACG. Key Messages 1. Offer anticoagulation to patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a modified CHA 2 DS 2 VASc score of 2 or more. 2. Choose warfarin or a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC), based on patient, drug and disease factors. Warfarin and NOACs are comparable in preventing AF-related stroke and systemic

2017 Appropriate Care Guides, Agency for Care Effectiveness (Singapore)

130. Anticoagulants in non-valvular atrial fibrillation

Anticoagulants in non-valvular atrial fibrillation 2017 www.kce.fgov.be KCE REPORT 279 ANTICOAGULANTS IN NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION 2017 www.kce.fgov.be KCE REPORT 279 HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT ANTICOAGULANTS IN NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION HANS VAN BRABANDT, LORENA SAN MIGUEL, NICOLAS FAIRON, BERT VAES, SEVERINE HENRARD, ANELIA BOSHNAKOVA, ROB COOK, ROB DAVIES, ADITI KARNAD, ALAN LOVELL, CECILE DUBOIS COLOPHON Title: Anticoagulants in non-valvular atrial fibrillation Authors: Hans (...) responsibility of the KCE. Publication date: 9 januari 2017 Domain: Health Technology Assessment (HTA) MeSH: atrial fibrillation; anticoagulants; secondary prevention; Belgium; cost-benefit analysis; Practice Patterns, Physicians'; Practice Guidelines as Topic NLM Classification: QV 193 Language: English Format: Adobe® PDF™ (A4) Legal depot: D/2016/10.273/101 ISSN: 2466-6459 Copyright: KCE reports are published under a “by/nc/nd” Creative Commons Licence http://kce.fgov.be/content/about-copyrights-for-kce

2017 Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre

131. Myths and Realities: Is My Cirrhotic Patient Auto-anticoagulated?

Myths and Realities: Is My Cirrhotic Patient Auto-anticoagulated? Myths and Realities: Is My Cirrhotic Patient Auto-anticoagulated? – Clinical Correlations Search Myths and Realities: Is My Cirrhotic Patient Auto-anticoagulated? January 12, 2017 6 min read By B. Corbett Walsh, MD Peer Reviewed Case: A 65 year-old man with cirrhosis is admitted to the ICU for severe pneumonia. His hepatic dysfunction is chronically severe, as indicated by a MELD score of 31, and he has a stable thrombocytopenia (...) of 110,000 platelets/ml. Should this patient be on DVT prophylaxis? MYTH: Patients with severe hepatic dysfunction resulting in a significantly elevated INR are auto-anticoagulated and protected against venous thromboembolic events. The liver is responsible for a plethora of processes: metabolic (carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, regulating the levels of glucose in the blood), storage (glycogen, triglycerides, iron, vitamins, minerals, etc), catabolic (hormones, proteins, drugs, toxins, alcohol

2017 Clinical Correlations

132. Anticoagulants for VTE Prevention in the Hospital Setting

Anticoagulants for VTE Prevention in the Hospital Setting Anticoagulants for VTE Prevention in the Hospital Setting | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Anticoagulants for VTE Prevention in the Hospital Setting Anticoagulants for VTE Prevention in the Hospital Setting Last updated: April 18, 2017 Project Number: HT0004-000 - OP0520-000 Product Line: Technology Review Result type: Report Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism ― or venous thromboembolic events (VTEs) ― are a major source

2017 CADTH - Technology Review

133. Mechanical and Bioprosthetic Heart Valves: Anticoagulant Therapy

Mechanical and Bioprosthetic Heart Valves: Anticoagulant Therapy © 2017 Thrombosis Canada Page 1 of 3 MECHANICAL AND BIOPROSTHETIC HEART VALVES: ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY OBJECTIVE: To summarize evidence-based recommendations for the management of antithrombotic drugs in patients with mechanical and bioprosthetic heart valves. BACKGROUND: Heart valve replacement can be done with either a mechanical or bioprosthetic (tissue) prosthesis. Mechanical Valves There are 3 basic types of mechanical valves (...) : 1. Bileaflet (e.g. St. Jude, most frequently seen today) 2. Tilting disc (e.g. Bjork-Shiley, infrequently seen today) 3. Ball-cage (e.g. Starr-Edwards, rarely seen today) Patients with mechanical heart valves are at increased risk for embolic stroke and thrombosis of the valve itself, and, therefore, require long-term anticoagulation. Even with anticoagulation, the risk of stroke/valve thrombosis is ~0.9%/year with mechanical mitral valves, ~0.5%/year for mechanical aortic valves, and ~1.2%/year

2017 Thrombosis Interest Group of Canada

134. Successful Anticoagulation Therapy for Antiphospholipid Syndrome with Mobile Aortic Thrombi Full Text available with Trip Pro

Successful Anticoagulation Therapy for Antiphospholipid Syndrome with Mobile Aortic Thrombi Hypercoagulable states have been associated with aortic thrombosis. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is one of the commonest types of acquired thrombophilia. We report the case of successful anticoagulation management in an APS patient with mobile thrombi within the aorta. A 58-year-old male patient presented to the emergency department (ED) with right-sided hemiparesis. His first symptoms were noted (...) approximately 12-16 hours before presentation to the ED. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed acute embolic infarction of the left frontal and parietotemporal lobes. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) demonstrated mobile thrombi attached to the wall of the ascending aorta and aortic arch. The patient was diagnosed with APS based on positivity of anti-beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibodies, and was initiated on anticoagulation therapy. Repeated TEE and CTA

2016 Vascular specialist international

135. Citrate versus non-citrate anticoagulation in continuous renal replacement therapy: Results following a change in local critical care protocol Full Text available with Trip Pro

Citrate versus non-citrate anticoagulation in continuous renal replacement therapy: Results following a change in local critical care protocol Continuous renal replacement therapy necessitates the use of anticoagulation. The anticoagulant of choice has traditionally been heparin. Emerging evidence has highlighted the deleterious effects of systemic heparin anticoagulation in the critically ill. Regional citrate anticoagulation has been used as an alternative in the setting of continuous renal (...) replacement therapy. Our retrospective before-and-after cohort study aimed to ascertain if regional citrate anticoagulation is associated with any benefit in terms of circuit longevity, rates of complications, blood transfusion requirements and mortality, when introduced to a large general intensive care unit with a case mix of acute medical patients and acute and elective surgical patients. The switch to regional citrate anticoagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy in our intensive care unit

2016 Journal of the Intensive Care Society

136. Determinants of Time in Therapeutic Range in Patients Receiving Oral Anticoagulants (A Substudy of IMPACT) (Abstract)

Determinants of Time in Therapeutic Range in Patients Receiving Oral Anticoagulants (A Substudy of IMPACT) Implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices can detect atrial tachyarrhythmias (atrial high-rate episodes [AHREs]) that are considered to correlate with atrial fibrillation and risk of stroke. In the IMPACT trial, oral anticoagulation was initiated when AHREs were detected by implanted cardioverter-defibrillators and withdrawn when they abated, according to a protocol accounting both for AHRE (...) is a simple clinical-derived score designed to aid decision-making on whether a patient is likely to achieve good anticoagulation control on vitamin K antagonist (e.g., warfarin), which was calculated and related to TTR achieved using the Rosendaal method. We analyzed 229 patients (mean age 66.7 years; mean CHADS2 score 2.85 [SD 1.1]) with mean TTR of 0.536 (SD 0.23) overall. Univariate analysis identified 5 variables associated with differences in mean TTR. Mean TTR was lower in those who were women (p

2016 EvidenceUpdates

137. Ciraparantag for haemorrhage in patients receiving new oral anticoagulants

Ciraparantag for haemorrhage in patients receiving new oral anticoagulants Ciraparantag for haemorrhage in patients receiving new oral anticoagulants Ciraparantag for haemorrhage in patients receiving new oral anticoagulants NIHR HSRIC Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation NIHR HSRIC. Ciraparantag for haemorrhage in patients receiving new oral (...) anticoagulants. Birmingham: NIHR Horizon Scanning Research&Intelligence Centre. Horizon Scanning Review. 2016 Authors' conclusions Ciraparantag is a new drug to treat bleeding in people taking new oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Anticoagulants are medicines which are given to people to thin the blood and prevent blood clots. Anticoagulation can become a problem when patients experience major bleeding, have a traumatic injury or require emergency surgery. There are currently no licensed treatments that can

2016 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

138. Anticoagulant: the "antidote" to dabigatran (Pradaxa) is insufficiently evaluated

Anticoagulant: the "antidote" to dabigatran (Pradaxa) is insufficiently evaluated Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Anticoagulant: the "antidote" to dabigatran (Pradaxa°) is insufficiently evaluated'', 1 November 2016 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Anticoagulant: the "antidote" to dabigatran (Pradaxa°) is insufficiently evaluated Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  (...)  |  Spotlight Anticoagulant: the "antidote" to dabigatran (Pradaxa°) is insufficiently evaluated The effects of idarucizumab (Praxbind°) have not been sufficiently evaluated: its effect against the risk of bleeding is not proven. Its authorisation as an antidote should not encourage the wider use of dabigatran. When it is necessary to thin the blood with an oral anticoagulant, warfarin, a vitamin K antagonist, is the reference treatment. Dabigatran (Pradaxa°), an anticoagulant from

2016 Prescrire

139. Peri-Operative Management of Anticoagulation and Antiplatelet Therapy

Peri-Operative Management of Anticoagulation and Antiplatelet Therapy 1 PERI-OPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF ANTICOAGULATION AND ANTIPLATELET THERAPY A British Society for Haematology Guideline David Keeling 1 , R Campbell Tait 2 , Henry Watson 3 . 1 Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK, 2 Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK, 3 Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, UK. Correspondence: BSH Administrator, British Society for Haematology, 100 White Lion Street, London, N1 9PF,UK. E (...) the issue of perioperative management of patients on direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) and antiplatelet agents which are becoming frequent clinical queries. This guideline will consider whether and when anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents should be stopped before elective surgery and invasive procedures, when agents can be restarted and how to manage patients on these drugs who require emergency surgery. If an anticoagulant or antiplatelet effect persists haemostasis may be improved by the use

2016 British Committee for Standards in Haematology

140. Prediction of bleeding events in patients with venous thromboembolism on stable anticoagulation treatment Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prediction of bleeding events in patients with venous thromboembolism on stable anticoagulation treatment Attempts at identifying patients with an elevated risk of bleeding while on anticoagulation following acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) have largely been unsuccessful thus far. We sought to develop a clinical prediction score for bleeding during stable anticoagulation treatment after acute VTE.We performed a post hoc analysis of the pooled RE-COVER studies, two double-blind randomised (...) group (OR 5.0; 95% CI 3.5-7.1). The score proved accurate for our primary end-point, i.e. prediction of major bleeding after day 30 ("stable" anticoagulation), both in patients on dabigatran (c-statistic 0.75, 95% CI 0.61-0.89) and those on warfarin (0.78, 95% CI 0.68-0.86; p=0.77 for difference).The new VTE-BLEED score accurately predicted major bleeding events in VTE patients on stable anticoagulation with both dabigatran and warfarin.Copyright ©ERS 2016.

2016 EvidenceUpdates