Latest & greatest articles for anticoagulation

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Top results for anticoagulation

101. Management of Bleeding in Patients on Oral Anticoagulants

Management of Bleeding in Patients on Oral Anticoagulants EXPERT CONSENSUS DECISION PATHWAY 2017 ACC Expert Consensus Decision PathwayonManagementofBleeding in Patients on Oral Anticoagulants A Report of the American College of Cardiology Task Force on Expert Consensus Decision Pathways Writing Committee Gordon F. Tomaselli, MD, FACC, Chair Kenneth W. Mahaffey, MD, FACC, Vice Chair Adam Cuker, MD, MS Paul P. Dobesh, PHARMD John U. Doherty, MD, FACC John W. Eikelboom, MBBS Roberta Florido, MD (...) on management of bleeding in patients on oral anticoagulants: a report of the American College of Cardiology Task Force on Expert Consensus Decision Pathways. J Am Coll Cardiol 2017;70:XXX–XX. Copies: This document is available on the World Wide Web site of the American College of Cardiology (www.acc.org). For copies of this document, please contact Elsevier Inc. Reprint Department via fax (212) 633-3820 or e-mail (reprints@elsevier.com). Permissions: Multiple copies, modi?cation, alteration, enhancement

American College of Cardiology2017

102. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)

Antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)

DynaMed Plus2017

103. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)

Antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)

DynaMed Plus2017

105. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for acute coronary syndromes

Antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for acute coronary syndromes

DynaMed Plus2017

109. Long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides (superwarfarins) toxicity - emergency management

Long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides (superwarfarins) toxicity - emergency management

DynaMed Plus2017

111. Periprocedural management of patients on long-term anticoagulation

Periprocedural management of patients on long-term anticoagulation

DynaMed Plus2017

112. Systematic review: Patients who self-monitor or self-manage can improve the quality of their oral anticoagulation therapy

Systematic review: Patients who self-monitor or self-manage can improve the quality of their oral anticoagulation therapy Patients who self-monitor or self-manage can improve the quality of their oral anticoagulation therapy | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password (...) ? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Patients who self-monitor or self-manage can improve the quality of their oral anticoagulation therapy Article Text Community and primary care nursing Systematic review Patients who self-monitor or self-manage can improve the quality of their oral anticoagulation therapy Michelle

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2017

113. Qualitative study?other: Patient self-testing and self-management of anticoagulation is safe and patients are satisfied with these programmes

Qualitative study?other: Patient self-testing and self-management of anticoagulation is safe and patients are satisfied with these programmes Patient self-testing and self-management of anticoagulation is safe and patients are satisfied with these programmes | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log (...) in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Patient self-testing and self-management of anticoagulation is safe and patients are satisfied with these programmes Article Text Adult

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2017

114. Qualitative study?other: Individualised assessment is required to establish the most appropriate anticoagulation option for patients

Qualitative study?other: Individualised assessment is required to establish the most appropriate anticoagulation option for patients Individualised assessment is required to establish the most appropriate anticoagulation option for patients | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your (...) username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Individualised assessment is required to establish the most appropriate anticoagulation option for patients Article Text Adult nursing Qualitative study

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2017

115. Anticoagulation - oral

Anticoagulation - oral Anticoagulation - oral - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Anticoagulation - oral: Summary There are five oral anticoagulants licensed for use in the UK: warfarin, apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban and rivaroxaban. Apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban and rivaroxaban are newer anticoagulants which may be prescribed instead of warfarin for people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF): Apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban and rivaroxaban have been approved by the National (...) . bleeding). Assess for the presence of thromboembolic events (e.g. symptoms of stroke, or breathlessness which may suggest a pulmonary embolism). The most common adverse effect of anticoagulants is bleeding; however, while there is an antidote for warfarin, of the new anticoagulants, there is currently only an antidote for dabigatran. Management of a bleeding complication in secondary care consists of stopping treatment and general haemostatic measures, such as mechanical compression and surgical

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries2017

116. Anticoagulants in non-valvular atrial fibrillation

Anticoagulants in non-valvular atrial fibrillation 2017 www.kce.fgov.be KCE REPORT 279 ANTICOAGULANTS IN NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION 2017 www.kce.fgov.be KCE REPORT 279 HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT ANTICOAGULANTS IN NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION HANS VAN BRABANDT, LORENA SAN MIGUEL, NICOLAS FAIRON, BERT VAES, SEVERINE HENRARD, ANELIA BOSHNAKOVA, ROB COOK, ROB DAVIES, ADITI KARNAD, ALAN LOVELL, CECILE DUBOIS COLOPHON Title: Anticoagulants in non-valvular atrial fibrillation Authors: Hans (...) responsibility of the KCE. Publication date: 9 januari 2017 Domain: Health Technology Assessment (HTA) MeSH: atrial fibrillation; anticoagulants; secondary prevention; Belgium; cost-benefit analysis; Practice Patterns, Physicians'; Practice Guidelines as Topic NLM Classification: QV 193 Language: English Format: Adobe® PDF™ (A4) Legal depot: D/2016/10.273/101 ISSN: 2466-6459 Copyright: KCE reports are published under a “by/nc/nd” Creative Commons Licence http://kce.fgov.be/content/about-copyrights-for-kce

Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre2017

117. Myths and Realities: Is My Cirrhotic Patient Auto-anticoagulated?

Myths and Realities: Is My Cirrhotic Patient Auto-anticoagulated? Myths and Realities: Is My Cirrhotic Patient Auto-anticoagulated? | Clinical Correlations Myths and Realities: Is My Cirrhotic Patient Auto-anticoagulated? January 12, 2017 By B. Corbett Walsh, MD Peer Reviewed Case: A 65 year-old man with cirrhosis is admitted to the ICU for severe pneumonia. His hepatic dysfunction is chronically severe, as indicated by a MELD score of 31, and he has a stable thrombocytopenia of 110,000 (...) platelets/ml. Should this patient be on DVT prophylaxis? MYTH: Patients with severe hepatic dysfunction resulting in a significantly elevated INR are auto-anticoagulated and protected against venous thromboembolic events. The liver is responsible for a plethora of processes: metabolic (carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, regulating the levels of glucose in the blood), storage (glycogen, triglycerides, iron, vitamins, minerals, etc), catabolic (hormones, proteins, drugs, toxins, alcohol), excretory (bile

Clinical Correlations2017

118. Successful Anticoagulation Therapy for Antiphospholipid Syndrome with Mobile Aortic Thrombi

Successful Anticoagulation Therapy for Antiphospholipid Syndrome with Mobile Aortic Thrombi 28042559 2018 11 13 2288-7970 32 4 2016 Dec Vascular specialist international Vasc Specialist Int Successful Anticoagulation Therapy for Antiphospholipid Syndrome with Mobile Aortic Thrombi. 186-189 10.5758/vsi.2016.32.4.186 Hypercoagulable states have been associated with aortic thrombosis. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is one of the commonest types of acquired thrombophilia. We report the case (...) of successful anticoagulation management in an APS patient with mobile thrombi within the aorta. A 58-year-old male patient presented to the emergency department (ED) with right-sided hemiparesis. His first symptoms were noted approximately 12-16 hours before presentation to the ED. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed acute embolic infarction of the left frontal and parietotemporal lobes. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) demonstrated mobile thrombi

Vascular specialist international2016 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

119. Anticoagulant: the "antidote" to dabigatran (Pradaxa) is insufficiently evaluated

Anticoagulant: the "antidote" to dabigatran (Pradaxa) is insufficiently evaluated Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Anticoagulant: the "antidote" to dabigatran (Pradaxa°) is insufficiently evaluated'', 1 November 2016 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Anticoagulant: the "antidote" to dabigatran (Pradaxa°) is insufficiently evaluated Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  (...)  |  Spotlight Anticoagulant: the "antidote" to dabigatran (Pradaxa°) is insufficiently evaluated The effects of idarucizumab (Praxbind°) have not been sufficiently evaluated: its effect against the risk of bleeding is not proven. Its authorisation as an antidote should not encourage the wider use of dabigatran. When it is necessary to thin the blood with an oral anticoagulant, warfarin, a vitamin K antagonist, is the reference treatment. Dabigatran (Pradaxa°), an anticoagulant from

Prescrire2016

120. Determinants of Time in Therapeutic Range in Patients Receiving Oral Anticoagulants (A Substudy of IMPACT)

Determinants of Time in Therapeutic Range in Patients Receiving Oral Anticoagulants (A Substudy of IMPACT) 27665206 2016 09 25 2017 04 27 2017 04 27 1879-1913 118 11 2016 Dec 01 The American journal of cardiology Am. J. Cardiol. Determinants of Time in Therapeutic Range in Patients Receiving Oral Anticoagulants (A Substudy of IMPACT). 1680-1684 S0002-9149(16)31438-2 10.1016/j.amjcard.2016.08.047 Implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices can detect atrial tachyarrhythmias (atrial high-rate episodes (...) [AHREs]) that are considered to correlate with atrial fibrillation and risk of stroke. In the IMPACT trial, oral anticoagulation was initiated when AHREs were detected by implanted cardioverter-defibrillators and withdrawn when they abated, according to a protocol accounting both for AHRE duration as detected by remote device monitoring and stroke risk assessment. In this analysis, we ascertained determinants of time in therapeutic range (TTR) among protocol-determined vitamin K antagonist-treated

EvidenceUpdates2016