Latest & greatest articles for anticoagulation

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Top results for anticoagulation

81. Renal Outcomes in Anticoagulated Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Full Text available with Trip Pro

Renal Outcomes in Anticoagulated Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Lifelong oral anticoagulation, either with warfarin or a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC), is indicated for stroke prevention in most patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Emerging evidence suggests that NOACs may be associated with better renal outcomes than warfarin.This study aimed to compare 4 oral anticoagulant agents (apixaban, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and warfarin) for their effects on 4 renal outcomes (...) : ≥30% decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), doubling of the serum creatinine level, acute kidney injury (AKI), and kidney failure.Using a large U.S. administrative database linked to laboratory results, the authors identified 9,769 patients with nonvalvular AF who started taking an oral anticoagulant agent between October 1, 2010 and April 30, 2016. Inverse probability of treatment weighting was used to balance more than 60 baseline characteristics among patients in the 4 drug

2017 EvidenceUpdates

82. Cyclophosphamide and regional citrate anticoagulation: A sour combination? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cyclophosphamide and regional citrate anticoagulation: A sour combination? We present a case of a woman in her 70 s, on cyclophosphamide for multiple myeloma, who was admitted to critical care with grade III acute kidney injury. Renal replacement therapy with regional citrate anticoagulation was commenced. Shortly thereafter her systemic-ionised calcium levels fell and remained stubbornly low until post-filter calcium return was doubled. Her total-to-ionised calcium ratio gradually increased (...) and so, to avoid further accumulation of citrate, anticoagulation was changed to heparin. Cyclophosphamide, which accumulates in renal failure, is known to interfere with key enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We postulate that cyclophosphamide interfered with her citrate metabolism, resulting in persistent systemic chelation of calcium.

2017 Journal of the Intensive Care Society

83. Comparative safety of direct oral anticoagulants and warfarin in venous thromboembolism: multicentre, population based, observational study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comparative safety of direct oral anticoagulants and warfarin in venous thromboembolism: multicentre, population based, observational study. Objective To determine the safety of direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) use compared with warfarin use for the treatment of venous thromboembolism.Design Retrospective matched cohort study conducted between 1 January 2009 and 31 March 2016.Setting Community based, using healthcare data from six jurisdictions in Canada and the United States.Participants 59

2017 BMJ

84. Association Between Use of Non-Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants With and Without Concurrent Medications and Risk of Major Bleeding in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association Between Use of Non-Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants With and Without Concurrent Medications and Risk of Major Bleeding in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation. Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are commonly prescribed with other medications that share metabolic pathways that may increase major bleeding risk.To assess the association between use of NOACs with and without concurrent medications and risk of major bleeding in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.Retrospective

2017 JAMA

85. D-dimer to guide the intensity of anticoagulation in Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement: a randomized controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

D-dimer to guide the intensity of anticoagulation in Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement: a randomized controlled trial Essentials Low anticoagulation intensity reduces bleeding but increases thrombosis during warfarin therapy. Elevated D-dimer level is associated with increased thrombosis events. D-dimer can be used to find potential thrombosis in those receiving low intensity therapy. D-dimer-guided therapy may be the optimal strategy for those with mechanical heart (...) valve replacement.Background Controversies remain regarding the optimal anticoagulation intensity for Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement despite guidelines having recommended a standard anticoagulation intensity. Objectives To investigate whether D-dimer could be used to determine the optimal anticoagulation intensity in Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement. Patients/Methods This was a prospective, randomized controlled clinical study. A total of 748

2017 EvidenceUpdates

86. Therapeutic endoscopy-related GI bleeding and thromboembolic events in patients using warfarin or direct oral anticoagulants: results from a large nationwide database analysis Full Text available with Trip Pro

Therapeutic endoscopy-related GI bleeding and thromboembolic events in patients using warfarin or direct oral anticoagulants: results from a large nationwide database analysis To compare the risks of postendoscopy outcomes associated with warfarin with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), taking into account heparin bridging and various types of endoscopic procedures.Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we identified 16 977 patients who underwent 13 types of high-risk

2017 EvidenceUpdates

87. Effect of Genotype-Guided Warfarin Dosing on Clinical Events and Anticoagulation Control Among Patients Undergoing Hip or Knee Arthroplasty: The GIFT Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Genotype-Guided Warfarin Dosing on Clinical Events and Anticoagulation Control Among Patients Undergoing Hip or Knee Arthroplasty: The GIFT Randomized Clinical Trial. Warfarin use accounts for more medication-related emergency department visits among older patients than any other drug. Whether genotype-guided warfarin dosing can prevent these adverse events is unknown.To determine whether genotype-guided dosing improves the safety of warfarin initiation.The randomized clinical Genetic

2017 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

88. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and reversal of apixaban anticoagulation with andexanet alfa Full Text available with Trip Pro

Safety, pharmacokinetics, and reversal of apixaban anticoagulation with andexanet alfa Direct factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors lack a specific reversal agent for emergencies such as major bleeding or urgent surgery. Andexanet alfa, a modified, catalytically inactive, recombinant human FXa derivative, reverses anticoagulant effect by binding and sequestering FXa inhibitors. This original report of safety and dose-finding, phase 1 and 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, investigated (...) or respiratory compromise that generally resolved without intervention or dose reduction. There were no thrombotic events or other serious safety issues. In conclusion, andexanet reversed apixaban-mediated effects on pharmacodynamic markers of anticoagulation in healthy volunteers within minutes after administration and for the duration of infusion. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01758432.

2017 Blood advances Controlled trial quality: predicted high

89. Management of anticoagulation in hip fractures: A pragmatic approach Full Text available with Trip Pro

Management of anticoagulation in hip fractures: A pragmatic approach Hip fractures are common and increasing with an ageing population. In the United Kingdom, the national guidelines recommend operative intervention within 36 hours of diagnosis. However, long-term anticoagulant treatment is frequently encountered in these patients which can delay surgical intervention. Despite this, there are no set national standards for management of drug-induced coagulopathy pre-operatively in the context (...) , evidence regarding the use of more novel antiplatelet medications (e.g. ticagrelor) and direct oral anticoagulants remains a largely unexplored area in the context of hip fracture surgery. We suggest treatment protocols based on best available evidence and guidance from allied specialties.Hip fracture surgery presents a common management dilemma where semi-urgent surgery is required. In this article, we advocate an evidence-based algorithm as a guide for managing these anticoagulated patients. Cite

2017 EFORT open reviews

90. Complete Resolution of a Large Bicuspid Aortic Valve Thrombus with Anticoagulation in Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome Full Text available with Trip Pro

Complete Resolution of a Large Bicuspid Aortic Valve Thrombus with Anticoagulation in Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome Native aortic valve thrombosis in primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) is a rare entity. We describe a 38-year-old man who presented with neurological symptoms and a cardiac murmur. Transthoracic echocardiography detected a large bicuspid aortic valve thrombus. Laboratory evaluation showed the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Anticoagulation was started, and serial

2017 Frontiers in cardiovascular medicine

91. Patent Foramen Ovale Closure or Anticoagulation vs. Antiplatelets after Stroke. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Patent Foramen Ovale Closure or Anticoagulation vs. Antiplatelets after Stroke. Trials of patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure to prevent recurrent stroke have been inconclusive. We investigated whether patients with cryptogenic stroke and echocardiographic features representing risk of stroke would benefit from PFO closure or anticoagulation, as compared with antiplatelet therapy.In a multicenter, randomized, open-label trial, we assigned, in a 1:1:1 ratio, patients 16 to 60 years of age who had (...) had a recent stroke attributed to PFO, with an associated atrial septal aneurysm or large interatrial shunt, to transcatheter PFO closure plus long-term antiplatelet therapy (PFO closure group), antiplatelet therapy alone (antiplatelet-only group), or oral anticoagulation (anticoagulation group) (randomization group 1). Patients with contraindications to anticoagulants or to PFO closure were randomly assigned to the alternative noncontraindicated treatment or to antiplatelet therapy (randomization

2017 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

92. Comparison of the CHA2DS2-VASc, CHADS2, HAS-BLED, ORBIT, and ATRIA Risk Scores in Predicting Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants-Associated Bleeding in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation (Abstract)

Comparison of the CHA2DS2-VASc, CHADS2, HAS-BLED, ORBIT, and ATRIA Risk Scores in Predicting Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants-Associated Bleeding in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation The increasing adoption of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) necessitates a reassessment of bleeding risk scores. Because known risk factors for bleeding are largely the same as for stroke, we hypothesize that stroke risk scores could (...) years], drugs/alcohol concomitantly [1 point each] [HAS-BLED], Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation [ORBIT], and AnTicoagulation and Risk factors In Atrial fibrillation [ATRIA]) in predicting major and intracranial bleeding. Using a large US commercial insurance database, we identified 39,539 patients with nonvalvular AF who started NOACs between October 1, 2010 and June 30, 2015. The performance of risk scores was compared using C-statistic and net reclassification

2017 EvidenceUpdates

93. A multifaceted intervention to improve treatment with oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (IMPACT-AF): an international, cluster-randomised trial. (Abstract)

A multifaceted intervention to improve treatment with oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (IMPACT-AF): an international, cluster-randomised trial. Oral anticoagulation is underused in patients with atrial fibrillation. We assessed the impact of a multifaceted educational intervention, versus usual care, on oral anticoagulant use in patients with atrial fibrillation.This study was a two-arm, prospective, international, cluster-randomised, controlled trial. Patients were included who had (...) atrial fibrillation and an indication for oral anticoagulation. Clusters were randomised (1:1) to receive a quality improvement educational intervention (intervention group) or usual care (control group). Randomisation was carried out centrally, using the eClinicalOS electronic data capture system. The intervention involved education of providers and patients, with regular monitoring and feedback. The primary outcome was the change in the proportion of patients treated with oral anticoagulants from

2017 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

94. Effectiveness and Safety of Standard-Dose Nonvitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants and Warfarin Among Patients With Atrial Fibrillation With a Single Stroke Risk Factor: A Nationwide Cohort Study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effectiveness and Safety of Standard-Dose Nonvitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants and Warfarin Among Patients With Atrial Fibrillation With a Single Stroke Risk Factor: A Nationwide Cohort Study The randomized clinical trials comparing nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) vs warfarin largely focused on recruiting high-risk patients with atrial fibrillation with more than 2 stroke risk factors, with only the trials testing dabigatran or apixaban including few patients with 1

2017 JAMA cardiology

95. Activated protein C light chain provides an extended binding surface for its anticoagulant cofactor, protein S Full Text available with Trip Pro

Activated protein C light chain provides an extended binding surface for its anticoagulant cofactor, protein S Protein S anticoagulant cofactor sensitivity and PAR1 cleavage activity were assayed for 9 recombinant APC mutants.Residues L38, K43, I73, F95, and W115 on one face of the APC light chain define an extended surface containing the protein S binding site.

2017 Blood advances

96. Influence of renal function on anticoagulation control in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation taking vitamin K antagonists Full Text available with Trip Pro

Influence of renal function on anticoagulation control in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation taking vitamin K antagonists Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been related to poor anticoagulation control and an increased risk of bleeding. This study aims to evaluate the association between impaired renal function (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 ) and anticoagulation control in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) on vitamin K antagonists (VKA) therapy. We also assessed whether (...) the predictive value of the SAMe-TT2 R2 score prevailed for subgroups both with and without CKD.This is an ancillary analysis of 1381 patients from the PAULA study, which was a cross-sectional, retrospective and nationwide multicenter study.A total of 370 patients had eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 . Anticoagulation control levels progressively worsened across each stage of CKD. Multiple linear regression analysis showed CKD as an independent predictor of time in therapeutic range (TTR). In the subgroup of patients

2017 EvidenceUpdates

97. Can I Safely Use Anticoagulants in my Patient with a Brain Tumor?

Can I Safely Use Anticoagulants in my Patient with a Brain Tumor? Can I Safely Use Anticoagulants in my Patient with a Brain Tumor? – Clinical Correlations Search Can I Safely Use Anticoagulants in my Patient with a Brain Tumor? August 3, 2017 7 min read By Christopher Sonne, MD Peer Reviewed It is the last admission of your admitting night shift. You are called to assess a pleasant, oriented 65-year-old man with lung cancer and metastases to the bone, liver, and brain. You review his history (...) to bleed. In this case, the patient has metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. Brain metastases from melanoma, thyroid cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and choriocarcinoma are traditionally known to [7]. For your patient, rate of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) from metastatic lung adenocarcinoma appears to be comparatively low [8]. You breathe a little easier. You then consider alternatives to anticoagulation. Pooled data using varied patient populations with malignancy shows a statistically

2017 Clinical Correlations

98. Risk Delayed Traumatic ICH in Patients on Anticoagulation

Risk Delayed Traumatic ICH in Patients on Anticoagulation Emergency Medicine > Journal Club > Archive > May 2017 Toggle navigation May 2017 Risk of Delayed Traumatic ICH in Patients on Anticoagulation Vignette You are working a moonlighting shift at a local level II trauma center when you meet Mr. X, a 68 year old gentleman with a history of atrial fibrillation, for which he takes diltiazem for rate control and warfarin for anticoagulation. He sees his primary care physician on a regular basis (...) the fall. On exam he has a GCS of 15, a super@icial abrasion to his forehead with a small 4 cm hematoma, no cervical spine pain or tenderness, and a normal neurologic examination. His INR today is 3.2. Being an astute reader of the literature, you remember that the studies on the Canadian Head CT rules excluded patients on anticoagulation, and proceed to order a head CT, which is read as normal by the attending radiologist (not a neuroradiologist). After updating the patient’s tetanus booster you

2017 Washington University Emergency Medicine Journal Club

99. The direct oral anticoagulants: can we finally stop using rat poison? Full Text available with Trip Pro

The direct oral anticoagulants: can we finally stop using rat poison? 29296740 2018 01 03 2473-9529 1 14 2017 Jun 13 Blood advances Blood Adv The direct oral anticoagulants: can we finally stop using rat poison? 980 10.1182/bloodadvances.2017002907 Crowther Mark M Section of Hematology, St. Joseph's Hospital, Hamilton, ON, Canada; and McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. eng Journal Article 2017 06 13 United States Blood Adv 101698425 2473-9529 Conflict-of-interest disclosure: M.C. serves

2017 Blood advances

100. Practical Implementation of Anticoagulation Strategy for Patients Undergoing Cardioversion of Atrial Fibrillation Full Text available with Trip Pro

Practical Implementation of Anticoagulation Strategy for Patients Undergoing Cardioversion of Atrial Fibrillation Anticoagulation is routinely prescribed to patients with persistent AF before cardioversion to reduce the risk of thromboembolic events. As direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have a rapid onset of action, a consistent anticoagulant effect, if taken correctly, and do not need monitoring or dose adjustments, there is considerable interest in their use for patients with AF undergoing

2017 Arrhythmia & electrophysiology review