Latest & greatest articles for anticoagulation

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Top results for anticoagulation

21. What Is the Incidence of Intracranial Hemorrhage Among Anticoagulated Patients With Minor Head Trauma? Full Text available with Trip Pro

What Is the Incidence of Intracranial Hemorrhage Among Anticoagulated Patients With Minor Head Trauma? What Is the Incidence of Intracranial Hemorrhage Among Anticoagulated Patients With Minor Head Trauma? - Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Volume 74, Issue 1, Pages 98–100 What Is the Incidence of Intracranial Hemorrhage Among Anticoagulated Patients With Minor Head Trauma? x Michael Gottlieb (...) , MD (EBEM Commentator) , x Somy M. Thottathil , MD (EBEM Commentator) , x Jacob P. Holton , MD (EBEM Commentator) Department of Emergency Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL DOI: | Publication History Published online: December 20, 2018 Expand all Collapse all Article Outline Take-Home Message Among anticoagulated patients presenting with minor head trauma, 9% may have an intracranial hemorrhage. Methods Data Sources PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane databases, and the Database

2019 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

22. Left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) in patients with atrial fibrillation who have contraindications to oral anticoagulation

Left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) in patients with atrial fibrillation who have contraindications to oral anticoagulation SHTG Advice | 1 SHTG Advice 06-19 August 2019 In response to an enquiry from the National Advisory Committee for Heart Disease Left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) in patients with atrial fibrillation who have contraindications to oral anticoagulation Advice for NHSScotland Left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) may be offered to patients with non-valvular atrial (...) fibrillation deemed to be at high risk of ischaemic stroke, who have absolute contraindications to oral anticoagulation with warfarin and direct oral anticoagulants. Prior to undergoing the LAAO procedure, an individual patient risk assessment must be carried out by a multidisciplinary team. The potential future benefits of LAAO, the risks associated with the procedure, and the need for long- term antiplatelet therapy, should be discussed with each patient prior to making a treatment decision. LAAO

2019 SHTG Advice Statements

23. Continuous Anticoagulation and Cold Snare Polypectomy Versus Heparin Bridging and Hot Snare Polypectomy in Patients on Anticoagulants With Subcentimeter Polyps: A Randomized Controlled Trial. (Abstract)

Continuous Anticoagulation and Cold Snare Polypectomy Versus Heparin Bridging and Hot Snare Polypectomy in Patients on Anticoagulants With Subcentimeter Polyps: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Management of anticoagulants for patients undergoing polypectomy is still controversial. Cold snare polypectomy (CSP) is reported to cause less bleeding than hot snare polypectomy (HSP).To compare outcomes between continuous administration of anticoagulants (CA) with CSP (CA+CSP) and periprocedural heparin (...) bridging (HB) with HSP (HB+HSP) for subcentimeter colorectal polyps.Multicenter, parallel, noninferiority randomized controlled trial. (University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry: UMIN000019355).30 Japanese institutions.Patients receiving anticoagulant therapy (warfarin or direct oral anticoagulants) who had at least 1 nonpedunculated subcentimeter colorectal polyp.Patients were randomly assigned to undergo HB+HSP or CA+CSP and followed up 28 days after polypectomy.The

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine Controlled trial quality: predicted high

24. Society of Interventional Radiology Consensus Guidelines for the Periprocedural Management of Thrombotic and Bleeding Risk in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Image-Guided Interventions—Part I: Review of Anticoagulation Agents and Clinical Considerations Full Text available with Trip Pro

Society of Interventional Radiology Consensus Guidelines for the Periprocedural Management of Thrombotic and Bleeding Risk in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Image-Guided Interventions—Part I: Review of Anticoagulation Agents and Clinical Considerations Society of Interventional Radiology Consensus Guidelines for the Periprocedural Management of Thrombotic and Bleeding Risk in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Image-Guided Interventions—Part I: Review of Anticoagulation Agents and Clinical (...) Considerations - Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology Email/Username: Password: Remember me Available now: Use your SIR login to access JVIR. Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Article in Press Society of Interventional Radiology Consensus Guidelines for the Periprocedural Management of Thrombotic and Bleeding Risk in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Image-Guided Interventions—Part I: Review of Anticoagulation Agents and Clinical Considerations Endorsed

2019 Society of Interventional Radiology

25. Oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation with valvular heart disease and bioprosthetic heart valves (Abstract)

Oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation with valvular heart disease and bioprosthetic heart valves Current guidelines endorse the use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, little is known about their safety and efficacy in valvular heart disease (VHD). Similarly, there is a paucity of data regarding NOACs use in patients with a bioprosthetic heart valve (BPHV). We, therefore, performed a network meta-analysis

2019 EvidenceUpdates

26. Direct oral anticoagulants in patients undergoing cardioversion: insight from randomized clinical trials. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Direct oral anticoagulants in patients undergoing cardioversion: insight from randomized clinical trials. Anticoagulation, reducing the risk of thromboembolic events in patients undergoing cardioversion, is a cornerstone of peri-cardioversion management in patients with atrial fibrillation. We aimed to analyse published data on the efficacy and safety of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in patients undergoing cardioversion. We performed a systematic review of randomized prospective clinical (...) ). The incidence rate of adverse events during DOAC treatment was found to be very similar to that observed with warfarin anticoagulation. In RCTs DOAC treatment in patients undergoing cardioversion appears to be effective and safe. However, because evidence in this clinical setting is still weak, observational reports could be useful in providing further data about peri-procedural outcomes.

2019 Monaldi archives for chest disease = Archivio Monaldi per le malattie del torace Controlled trial quality: uncertain

27. Incident Atrial Fibrillation, Dementia and the Role of Anticoagulation: A Population-Based Cohort Study (Abstract)

Incident Atrial Fibrillation, Dementia and the Role of Anticoagulation: A Population-Based Cohort Study  Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with dementia. Anticoagulation may modify this relationship, but it is unclear if this is due to stroke reduction alone. Age- and sex-matched individuals from the U.K. Clinical Practice Research Datalink (2008-2016) with and without an incident diagnosis of AF were followed for a new dementia diagnosis. We estimated adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs (...) ) for incident dementia diagnosis in the AF cohort, overall and stratified by anticoagulation status, using the matched non-AF cohorts as reference. We performed a sensitivity analysis excluding individuals with stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA) before the observation period. Over 193,082 person-years (mean follow-up 25.7 ± 0.1 months), 347/15,276 AF (2.3%) and 1,085/76,096 non-AF (1.4%) were newly diagnosed with dementia (aHR, 1.31, 95% confidence interval, 1.15-1.49). The AF group had more co

2019 EvidenceUpdates

28. Effect of anticoagulant treatment on pain in distal deep vein thrombosis: an ancillary analysis from the cactus trial (Abstract)

Effect of anticoagulant treatment on pain in distal deep vein thrombosis: an ancillary analysis from the cactus trial Essentials Management of patients with calf deep vein thrombosis remains controversial. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of a placebo controlled LMWH randomized clinical trial. Pain was assessed using visual analogue scale at inclusion, one and six weeks. There was no difference in pain control between the two arms. SUMMARY: Background The optimal management of distal deep vein (...) thrombosis (DVT) is highly debated. The only available placebo-controlled trial suggested the absence of clear benefit of anticoagulation. Many physicians feel that, beyond preventing thromboembolic complications, anticoagulation with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) has the potential to improve pain control. Objectives To analyze whether LMWHs decrease pain in patients with distal deep vein thrombosis. Patients and methods Two-hundred and fifty-two patients included in a multicenter, placebo

2019 EvidenceUpdates

29. Responsible, Safe, and Effective Use of Antithrombotics and Anticoagulants in Patients Undergoing Interventional Techniques: American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) Guidelines (Abstract)

Responsible, Safe, and Effective Use of Antithrombotics and Anticoagulants in Patients Undergoing Interventional Techniques: American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) Guidelines Interventional pain management involves diagnosis and treatment of chronic pain. This specialty utilizes minimally invasive procedures to target therapeutics to the central nervous system and the spinal column. A subset of patients encountered in interventional pain are medicated using anticoagulant (...) or antithrombotic drugs to mitigate thrombosis risk. Since these drugs target the clotting system, bleeding risk is a consideration accompanying interventional procedures. Importantly, discontinuation of anticoagulant or antithrombotic drugs exposes underlying thrombosis risk, which can lead to significant morbidity and mortality especially in those with coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease. This review summarizes the literature and provides guidelines based on best evidence for patients receiving anti

2019 EvidenceUpdates

30. Concomitant Use of Direct Oral Anticoagulants with Antiplatelet Agents and the Risk of Major Bleeding in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Full Text available with Trip Pro

Concomitant Use of Direct Oral Anticoagulants with Antiplatelet Agents and the Risk of Major Bleeding in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation commonly have comorbidities requiring concurrent use of oral anticoagulants and antiplatelets. There are no real-world data on the comparative safety of concomitant antithrombotic treatments in the era of direct oral anticoagulant (DOACs). Thus, we compared the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage (...) (HR 0.46; 95% CI, 0.24-0.91) and other major bleeding (HR 0.68; 95% CI, 0.51-0.91) compared with concomitant VKA-antiplatelet use.Concomitant DOAC-antiplatelet use was associated with a similar risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, and a lower risk of intracranial hemorrhage and other major bleeding than concomitant VKA-antiplatelet use. These findings could inform physician decision-making in patients requiring concomitant treatment with oral anticoagulants and antiplatelets.Copyright © 2018

2019 EvidenceUpdates

31. Performing non-neuraxial bedside procedures on patients taking anticoagulants

Performing non-neuraxial bedside procedures on patients taking anticoagulants Blood&Clots Series: Performing non-neuraxial bedside procedures on patients taking anticoagulants - CanadiEM Blood&Clots Series: Performing non-neuraxial bedside procedures on patients taking anticoagulants In , by Calvin Yeh February 19, 2019 All the content from the Blood & Clots series can be found . CanMEDS Roles addressed: Medical expert Case Description You are assessing a patient in the emergency room who (...) is presenting with a unilateral large pleural effusion that is causing hypoxia and shortness of breath. She needs a thoracentesis but her INR is 3.0 due to the Warfarin she takes for atrial fibrillation. How can this procedure be performed safely? What about other common (non-neuraxial) bedside procedures (thoracentesis, NG tube, paracentesis, arthrocentesis) – when is it safe to perform these procedures while on anticoagulants (DOACs, Warfarin)? Main Text Thoracentesis-associated Risk Case series

2019 CandiEM

32. Decreased risk of renal impairment in atrial fibrillation patients receiving non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants: A pooled analysis of randomized controlled trials and real-world studies (Abstract)

Decreased risk of renal impairment in atrial fibrillation patients receiving non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants: A pooled analysis of randomized controlled trials and real-world studies Patients with warfarin have a potential risk of warfarin-related nephropathy, which could result in the discontinuation of anticoagulation therapy. The question of whether non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) use is associated with increased risk of renal impairment in atrial

2019 EvidenceUpdates

33. Open-Label Randomized Trial Comparing Oral Anticoagulation With and Without Single Antiplatelet Therapy in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Stable Coronary Artery Disease Beyond 1 Year After Coronary Stent Implantation Full Text available with Trip Pro

Open-Label Randomized Trial Comparing Oral Anticoagulation With and Without Single Antiplatelet Therapy in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Stable Coronary Artery Disease Beyond 1 Year After Coronary Stent Implantation Despite recommendations in the guidelines and consensus documents, there has been no randomized controlled trial evaluating oral anticoagulation (OAC) alone without antiplatelet therapy (APT) in patients with atrial fibrillation and stable coronary artery disease beyond 1 (...) on Thrombosis and Haemostasis classification. Although the trial was designed to enroll 2000 patients during 12 months, enrollment was prematurely terminated after enrolling 696 patients in 38 months.Mean age was 75.0±7.6 years, and 85.2% of patients were men. OAC was warfarin in 75.2% and direct oral anticoagulants in 24.8% of patients. The mean CHADS2 score was 2.5±1.2. During a median follow-up interval of 2.5 years, the primary end point occurred in 54 patients (15.7%) in the OAC-alone group and in 47

2019 EvidenceUpdates

34. General medicine: Uncertainty surrounds anticoagulation risks and benefits in patients with chronic kidney disease with atrial fibrillation

General medicine: Uncertainty surrounds anticoagulation risks and benefits in patients with chronic kidney disease with atrial fibrillation Uncertainty surrounds anticoagulation risks and benefits in patients with chronic kidney disease with atrial fibrillation | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu (...) Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Uncertainty surrounds anticoagulation risks and benefits in patients with chronic kidney disease with atrial fibrillation Article Text Commentary General medicine Uncertainty surrounds anticoagulation risks and benefits in patients with chronic kidney disease with atrial fibrillation David Massicotte-Azarniouch 1 , Manish M Sood 1 , 2

2019 Evidence-Based Medicine

35. Impact of oral anticoagulants on 30-day readmission: a study from a single academic centre

Impact of oral anticoagulants on 30-day readmission: a study from a single academic centre Impact of oral anticoagulants on 30-day readmission: a study from a single academic centre | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers (...) of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Impact of oral anticoagulants on 30-day readmission: a study from a single academic centre Article Text Original EBM Research Impact of oral anticoagulants on 30-day readmission: a study from a single academic centre Statistics from Altmetric.com You do not have access to the full text of this article, the first page of the of this article appears above. Footnotes Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant

2019 Evidence-Based Medicine

36. The effective, safe and appropriate use of anticoagulation medicines: A systematic overview of reviews

The effective, safe and appropriate use of anticoagulation medicines: A systematic overview of reviews anticoagulation medicines 18 March 2019 Links Download reports (pdf) Evidence Summary Evidence Report The effective, safe and appropriate use of anticoagulation medicines: A systematic overview of reviews. What do we want to know? Anticoagulation drugs are used to prevent and treat irregular heartbeat (atrial fibrillation, AF), and clotting of blood in veins (venous thromboembolism, VTE (...) ). Until recently, warfarin was the only available drug to manage or prevent these conditions. Recently, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have become available for prescription. To bring together current understanding about these treatments, we sought to address broad research questions: What evidence syntheses have been conducted to address the efficacy and safety of UK-approved oral anticoagulant therapy with respect to warfarin, novel oral anticoagulants, genotyping (i.e. using genetic information

2019 EPPI Centre

37. Continued vs. interrupted direct oral anticoagulants at the time of device surgery, in patients with moderate to high risk of arterial thrombo-embolic events (BRUISE CONTROL-2) (Abstract)

Continued vs. interrupted direct oral anticoagulants at the time of device surgery, in patients with moderate to high risk of arterial thrombo-embolic events (BRUISE CONTROL-2) Guidelines recommend warfarin continuation rather than heparin bridging for pacemaker and defibrillator surgery, after the BRUISE CONTROL trial demonstrated an 80% reduction in device pocket haematoma with this approach. However, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are now used to treat the majority of patients (...) -operation, interruption of anticoagulation, or prolonging hospital stay. In the continued arm, the median time between pre- and post-operative DOAC doses was 12 h; in the interrupted arm the median time was 72 h. Clinically significant haematoma occurred in of 7 of 328 (2.1%; 95% CI 0.9-4.3) patients in the continued DOAC arm and 7 of 334 (2.1%; 95% CI 0.9-4.3) patients in the interrupted DOAC arm (P = 0.97). Complications were uncommon, and included one stroke and one symptomatic pericardial effusion

2019 EvidenceUpdates

38. Anticoagulation - oral

Anticoagulation - oral Anticoagulation - oral - NICE CKS Share Anticoagulation - oral: Summary There are five oral anticoagulants licensed for use in the UK: warfarin, apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban and rivaroxaban. Apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban and rivaroxaban are newer anticoagulants which may be prescribed instead of warfarin for people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF): Apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban and rivaroxaban have been approved by the National Institute for Health (...) , regular follow up and monitoring is still required to: Assess compliance. Enquire about the presence of any adverse effect (e.g. bleeding). Assess for the presence of thromboembolic events (e.g. symptoms of stroke, or breathlessness which may suggest a pulmonary embolism). The most common adverse effect of anticoagulants is bleeding; however, while there is an antidote for warfarin, of the new anticoagulants, there is currently only an antidote for dabigatran. Management of a bleeding complication

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

39. Relationship between degree of heparin anticoagulation and clinical outcome in patients receiving potent P2Y12-inhibitors with no planned GPI during primary percutaneous coronary intervention in acute myocardial infarction - a VALIDATE-SWEDEHEART substudy (Abstract)

Relationship between degree of heparin anticoagulation and clinical outcome in patients receiving potent P2Y12-inhibitors with no planned GPI during primary percutaneous coronary intervention in acute myocardial infarction - a VALIDATE-SWEDEHEART substudy Heparin is the preferred choice of anticoagulant in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute myocardial infarction (MI). An established dosage of heparin has not yet been determined, but treatment may be optimized through monitoring (...) of activating clotting time (ACT). The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between heparin dose or ACT with a composite outcome of death, MI or bleeding using data from the registry-based, randomized, controlled and open-label VALIDATE-SWEDEHEART-trial, although patients were not randomized to heparin dose in this sub-study.Patients with MI undergoing PCI and receiving treatment with a potent P2Y12-inhibitor and anticoagulation with heparin, without the planned use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa

2019 European heart journal. Cardiovascular pharmacotherapy Controlled trial quality: uncertain

40. General medicine: Optimal anticoagulant treatment of cancer-associated venous thromboembolism remains unclear

General medicine: Optimal anticoagulant treatment of cancer-associated venous thromboembolism remains unclear Optimal anticoagulant treatment of cancer-associated venous thromboembolism remains unclear | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal (...) accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Optimal anticoagulant treatment of cancer-associated venous thromboembolism remains unclear Article Text Commentary General medicine Optimal anticoagulant treatment of cancer-associated venous thromboembolism remains unclear Hanny Al-Samkari Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Kahale LA, Hakoum MB, Tsolakian IG, et al . Anticoagulation for the long-term treatment of venous

2019 Evidence-Based Medicine