Latest & greatest articles for anticoagulation

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on anticoagulation and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for anticoagulation

21. The efficacy and safety of anticoagulation in cerebral vein thrombosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

The efficacy and safety of anticoagulation in cerebral vein thrombosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis 30056293 2018 09 17 1879-2472 169 2018 09 Thrombosis research Thromb. Res. The efficacy and safety of anticoagulation in cerebral vein thrombosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 135-139 S0049-3848(18)30440-7 10.1016/j.thromres.2018.07.023 Anticoagulation with unfractionated heparin (UFH) or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is the mainstay for the treatment of patients (...) with acute cerebral vein thrombosis (CVT) with or without intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the efficacy and safety of LMWH compared to UFH for the treatment of acute CVT. An electronic search of MEDLINE, Pubmed, CENTRAL and Google Scholar was performed. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) reporting on the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation for acute treatment of CVT were included. Outcomes of interest included mortality, disability, new ICH

EvidenceUpdates2018

22. Meta-Analysis Comparing the Efficacy, Safety, and Cost-Benefit of Direct Acting Oral Anticoagulants Versus Enoxaparin Thromboprophylaxis to Prevent Venous Thromboembolism Among Hospitalized Patients

Meta-Analysis Comparing the Efficacy, Safety, and Cost-Benefit of Direct Acting Oral Anticoagulants Versus Enoxaparin Thromboprophylaxis to Prevent Venous Thromboembolism Among Hospitalized Patients 30082040 2018 08 07 1879-1913 2018 Jul 05 The American journal of cardiology Am. J. Cardiol. Meta-Analysis Comparing the Efficacy, Safety, and Cost-Benefit of Direct Acting Oral Anticoagulants Versus Enoxaparin Thromboprophylaxis to Prevent Venous Thromboembolism Among Hospitalized Patients. S0002 (...) -9149(18)31327-4 10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.06.035 Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potentially fatal complication of hospitalization. Thromboprophylaxis using subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) can result in local irritation, pain, and ecchymoses, leading to nonadherence. Direct acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are an alternative, but their efficacy and safety for short-term inpatient-only use versus LMWH, in medically hospitalized patients, has not been rigorously assessed. We

EvidenceUpdates2018

23. Practical Guide to Ablation for Epicardial Ventricular Tachycardia: When to Get Access, How to Deal with Anticoagulation and How to Prevent Complications

Practical Guide to Ablation for Epicardial Ventricular Tachycardia: When to Get Access, How to Deal with Anticoagulation and How to Prevent Complications 30416728 2018 12 07 2050-3369 7 3 2018 Aug Arrhythmia & electrophysiology review Arrhythm Electrophysiol Rev Practical Guide to Ablation for Epicardial Ventricular Tachycardia: When to Get Access, How to Deal with Anticoagulation and How to Prevent Complications. 159-164 10.15420/aer.2018.10.2 Epicardial ablation is needed to eliminate (...) ventricular tachycardia (VT) in some patients with nonischaemic cardiomyopathy. The 12-lead electrocardiogram of VT, pre-procedural imaging and endocardial unipolar voltage maps can predict a high likelihood of epicardial substrate and VT. A septal VT substrate may preclude the need for epicardial access and mapping and can be identified with imaging, pacing and voltage mapping. Pericardial access is usually obtained prior to systemic anticoagulation or after reversal of systemic anticoagulation. A unique

Arrhythmia & electrophysiology review2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

24. A systematic review and Bayesian network meta-analysis of risk of intracranial hemorrhage with direct oral anticoagulants

A systematic review and Bayesian network meta-analysis of risk of intracranial hemorrhage with direct oral anticoagulants 29723935 2018 07 04 1538-7836 16 7 2018 Jul Journal of thrombosis and haemostasis : JTH J. Thromb. Haemost. A systematic review and Bayesian network meta-analysis of risk of intracranial hemorrhage with direct oral anticoagulants. 1296-1306 10.1111/jth.14131 Essentials Risk of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) may differ between direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). We compared (...) the risk of ICH between DOACs using network meta-analysis. Dabigatran 110 mg and 150 mg were safer than rivaroxaban on Bayesian analysis. Dabigatran 110 mg ranked as the safest DOAC while rivaroxaban ranked last. Background The comparative risk of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) among direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) remains unclear. Objective To determine the difference in risk of ICH between DOACs Methods Seventeen randomized controlled trials (RCTs

EvidenceUpdates2018

25. Reduced-dose direct oral anticoagulants in the extended treatment of venous thromboembolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Reduced-dose direct oral anticoagulants in the extended treatment of venous thromboembolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis 29772108 2018 07 04 1538-7836 16 7 2018 Jul Journal of thrombosis and haemostasis : JTH J. Thromb. Haemost. Reduced-dose direct oral anticoagulants in the extended treatment of venous thromboembolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 1288-1295 10.1111/jth.14156 Essentials In venous thromboembolism (VTE), benefits of extended treatment are balanced by bleeding (...) risks. This is a meta-analysis of reduced-dose direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in extended treatment. Reduced-dose DOACs are as effective as full anticoagulation with bleeding risks similar to placebo. Reduced-dose DOACs are an attractive option for patients in the extended phase of VTE treatment. Background Extended-duration anticoagulation is beneficial for preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE). Reduced-dose direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) may be preferable if they preserve

EvidenceUpdates2018

26. Anticoagulation

Anticoagulation Top results for anticoagulation - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast My query is: English Français Deutsch Čeština Español Magyar Svenska ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing (...) the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for anticoagulation The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines

Trip Latest and Greatest2018

27. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents for primary prevention of thrombosis in individuals with antiphospholipid antibodies.

Antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents for primary prevention of thrombosis in individuals with antiphospholipid antibodies. BACKGROUND: Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterised by the presence of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies that have prothrombotic activity. Antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with an increased risk of pregnancy complications (recurrent miscarriage, premature birth, intrauterine growth retardation) and thrombotic events (both arterial (...) and venous). The most common thrombotic events include brain ischaemia (stroke or transient ischaemic attack) and deep vein thrombosis. To diagnose APS, the presence of aPL antibodies in two measurements and at least one thrombotic event or pregnancy complication are required. It is unclear if people with positive aPL antibodies but without any previous thrombotic events should receive primary antithrombotic prophylaxis. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of antiplatelet or anticoagulant agents versus

Cochrane2018

28. Anticoagulation for perioperative thromboprophylaxis in people with cancer.

Anticoagulation for perioperative thromboprophylaxis in people with cancer. BACKGROUND: The choice of the appropriate perioperative thromboprophylaxis for people with cancer depends on the relative benefits and harms of different anticoagulants. OBJECTIVES: To systematically review the evidence for the relative efficacy and safety of anticoagulants for perioperative thromboprophylaxis in people with cancer. SEARCH METHODS: This update of the systematic review was based on the findings (...) , major bleeding, minor bleeding, postphlebitic syndrome, health related quality of life, and thrombocytopenia. We assessed the certainty of evidence for each outcome using the GRADE approach (GRADE Handbook). MAIN RESULTS: Of 7670 identified unique citations, we included 20 RCTs with 9771 randomized people with cancer receiving preoperative prophylactic anticoagulation. We identified seven reports for seven new RCTs for this update.The meta-analyses did not conclusively rule out either a beneficial

Cochrane2018

29. Risks and benefits of direct oral anticoagulants versus warfarin in a real world setting: cohort study in primary care.

Risks and benefits of direct oral anticoagulants versus warfarin in a real world setting: cohort study in primary care. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the associations between direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) and risks of bleeding, ischaemic stroke, venous thromboembolism, and all cause mortality compared with warfarin. DESIGN: Prospective open cohort study. SETTING: UK general practices contributing to QResearch or Clinical Practice Research Datalink. PARTICIPANTS: 132 231 warfarin, 7744 (...) dabigatran, 37 863 rivaroxaban, and 18 223 apixaban users without anticoagulant prescriptions for 12 months before study entry, subgrouped into 103 270 patients with atrial fibrillation and 92 791 without atrial fibrillation between 2011 and 2016. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Major bleeding leading to hospital admission or death. Specific sites of bleeding and all cause mortality were also studied. RESULTS: In patients with atrial fibrillation, compared with warfarin, apixaban was associated with a decreased

BMJ2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

30. Antifibrinolytic therapy for preventing oral bleeding in people on anticoagulants undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions.

Antifibrinolytic therapy for preventing oral bleeding in people on anticoagulants undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions. BACKGROUND: Individuals on continuous treatment with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are at increased risk of bleeding complications during and after oral or dental procedures. Anticoagulant treatment is preferably continued at the same dose, since dose reduction or discontinuation of treatment is associated with an increased (...) risk of thromboembolism. The use of haemostatic measures during or after the procedure (or both) could enable continuation of the oral anticoagulant treatment. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to assess the efficacy of antifibrinolytic agents for preventing bleeding complications in people on oral anticoagulants undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database

Cochrane2018

31. Anticoagulation and Antiplatelet Strategies After On-X Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement

Anticoagulation and Antiplatelet Strategies After On-X Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement 29903344 2018 06 15 1558-3597 71 24 2018 Jun 19 Journal of the American College of Cardiology J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. Anticoagulation and Antiplatelet Strategies After On-X Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement. 2717-2726 S0735-1097(18)34561-3 10.1016/j.jacc.2018.03.535 The burden oral anticoagulation is a limitation of mechanical valve prostheses. The aim of this study was to test whether patients could (...) be safely managed with dual-antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) (aspirin 325 mg and clopidogrel 75 mg) or lower warfarin after On-X mechanical aortic valve replacement (mAVR). PROACT (Prospective Randomized On-X Anticoagulation Trial) (n = 576) is a multicenter (41 sites) noninferiority trial. From June 2006 through February 2014, 201 patients ≥18 years of age without thromboembolic risk factors undergoing mAVR were randomized to receive DAPT (n = 99) or standard warfarin plus aspirin (n = 102) 3 months after

EvidenceUpdates2018

32. Interventional Spine and Pain Procedures in Patients on Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Medications

Interventional Spine and Pain Procedures in Patients on Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Medications Interventional Spine and Pain Procedures in Patients on Anti... : Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. You currently have no recent searches Enter your Email address: Wolters Kluwer Health may email you for journal alerts and information, but is committed to maintaining your (...) successfully sent to your colleague. Some error has occurred while processing your request. Please try after some time. Export to End Note Procite Reference Manager Save my selection doi: 10.1097/AAP.0000000000000700 Chronic and Interventional Pain: Special Article The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) 2012 survey of meeting attendees showed that existing ASRA anticoagulation guidelines for regional anesthesia were insufficient for their needs. Those surveyed agreed

American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine2018

33. Anticoagulation for the long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism in people with cancer.

Anticoagulation for the long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism in people with cancer. BACKGROUND: Cancer increases the risk of thromboembolic events, especially in people receiving anticoagulation treatments. OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy and safety of low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs), direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) for the long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in people with cancer. SEARCH METHODS: We conducted a literature (...) ), or thrombocytopenia (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.52 to 1.69). Meta-analysis of five studies showed that LMWHs probably reduced the recurrence of VTE compared to VKAs (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.77; RD 53 fewer per 1000, 95% CI 29 fewer to 72 fewer, moderate-certainty evidence).Direct oral anticoagulants versus vitamin K antagonistsFive studies enrolling 982 participants compared DOACs with VKAs. Meta-analysis of four studies may not rule out a beneficial or harmful effect of DOACs compared to VKAs on mortality (RR 0.93, 95

Cochrane2018

34. Anticoagulation for people with cancer and central venous catheters.

Anticoagulation for people with cancer and central venous catheters. BACKGROUND: Central venous catheter (CVC) placement increases the risk of thrombosis in people with cancer. Thrombosis often necessitates the removal of the CVC, resulting in treatment delays and thrombosis-related morbidity and mortality. This is an update of the Cochrane Review published in 2014. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation for thromboprophylaxis in people with cancer with a CVC. SEARCH (...) : Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the benefits and harms of unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), vitamin K antagonists (VKA), or fondaparinux or comparing the effects of two of these anticoagulants in people with cancer and a CVC. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Using a standardized form, we extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Outcomes included all-cause mortality, symptomatic catheter-related venous thromboembolism (VTE), pulmonary embolism (PE), major

Cochrane2018

35. Asian patients versus non-Asian patients in the efficacy and safety of direct oral anticoagulants relative to vitamin K antagonist for venous thromboembolism: A systemic review and meta-analysis

Asian patients versus non-Asian patients in the efficacy and safety of direct oral anticoagulants relative to vitamin K antagonist for venous thromboembolism: A systemic review and meta-analysis 29655001 2018 05 22 1879-2472 166 2018 Jun Thrombosis research Thromb. Res. Asian patients versus non-Asian patients in the efficacy and safety of direct oral anticoagulants relative to vitamin K antagonist for venous thromboembolism: A systemic review and meta-analysis. 37-42 S0049-3848(18)30306-2 (...) 10.1016/j.thromres.2018.04.008 The standard for treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been vitamin K antagonist (VKA), which might be associated with a higher risk of bleeding particularly in Asian patients. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) have been shown to be safer alternatives for VTE. It remains unclear whether this is the case in Asian ethnicity. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of DOACs in Asian

EvidenceUpdates2018

36. A clinical decision support tool for improving adherence to guidelines on anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke: A cluster-randomized trial in a Swedish primary care setting (the CDS-AF study)

A clinical decision support tool for improving adherence to guidelines on anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke: A cluster-randomized trial in a Swedish primary care setting (the CDS-AF study) 29534063 2018 03 25 1549-1676 15 3 2018 Mar PLoS medicine PLoS Med. A clinical decision support tool for improving adherence to guidelines on anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke: A cluster-randomized trial in a Swedish primary (...) care setting (the CDS-AF study). e1002528 10.1371/journal.pmed.1002528 Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with substantial morbidity, in particular stroke. Despite good evidence for the reduction of stroke risk with anticoagulant therapy, there remains significant undertreatment. The main aim of the current study was to investigate whether a clinical decision support tool (CDS) for stroke prevention integrated in the electronic health record could improve adherence to guidelines for stroke prevention

EvidenceUpdates2018 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

37. Incident Risk Factors and Major Bleeding in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Treated with Oral Anticoagulants: A Comparison of Baseline, Follow-up and Delta HAS-BLED Scores with an Approach Focused on Modifiable Bleeding Risk Factors

Incident Risk Factors and Major Bleeding in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Treated with Oral Anticoagulants: A Comparison of Baseline, Follow-up and Delta HAS-BLED Scores with an Approach Focused on Modifiable Bleeding Risk Factors 29510426 2018 04 04 2567-689X 118 4 2018 Apr Thrombosis and haemostasis Thromb. Haemost. Incident Risk Factors and Major Bleeding in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Treated with Oral Anticoagulants: A Comparison of Baseline, Follow-up and Delta HAS-BLED Scores

EvidenceUpdates2018

38. Direct acting oral anticoagulants likely to be better than warfarin for people taking them for atrial fibrillation

Direct acting oral anticoagulants likely to be better than warfarin for people taking them for atrial fibrillation NIHR DC | Signal - Direct acting oral anticoagulants likely to be better than warfarin for people taking them for atrial fibrillation Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Direct acting oral anticoagulants likely to be better than warfarin for people taking them for atrial fibrillation Published on 6 February 2018 In people with atrial fibrillation needing (...) anticoagulant treatment, deaths were fewer in those who had direct acting oral anticoagulants compared with warfarin. The picture is less clear for the risk of stroke and complications such as bleeding in the brain or gut. Apixaban had the best efficacy and safety profile and was cost-effective compared with warfarin. This study pooled the data in all trials reporting efficacy, safety and cost of anticoagulant prevention of stroke events in people with atrial fibrillation. Researchers used a technique

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

39. Screen reminders for GPs did not improve anticoagulant prescribing in atrial fibrillation

Screen reminders for GPs did not improve anticoagulant prescribing in atrial fibrillation NIHR DC | Signal - Screen reminders for GPs did not improve anticoagulant prescribing in atrial fibrillation Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Screen reminders for GPs did not improve anticoagulant prescribing in atrial fibrillation Published on 18 July 2017 General practice software that generated screen reminders for patients with atrial fibrillation did not increase (...) the proportion taking oral anticoagulants appropriately by six months. This NIHR-funded trial included GPs in 47 surgeries in England and found that at the start only 63% of eligible patients with atrial fibrillation were being prescribed anticoagulants. Six months later the rate had increased to 66% in intervention practices and 64% in those following usual practice, a non-significant difference between the groups. Use of the software was associated with increased diagnosis of transient ischemic attack

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

40. Extending anticoagulant treatment beyond three months reduces the risk of recurrent blood clots

Extending anticoagulant treatment beyond three months reduces the risk of recurrent blood clots NIHR DC | Signal - Extending anticoagulant treatment beyond three months reduces the risk of recurrent blood clots Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Extending anticoagulant treatment beyond three months reduces the risk of recurrent blood clots Published on 1 March 2016 Warfarin, newer direct oral anticoagulants and aspirin all significantly reduced the rate (...) of recurrent clots in patients treated for more than the standard three months. Aspirin was the least effective and the number of major bleeds and deaths was low in all three groups. This review pooling seven trials found that between six and 36 months 28 in every 1000 people taking warfarin, direct oral anticoagulants or aspirin after a first blood clot developed a second clot. This was significantly fewer than the 97 per 1000 people who developed a second clot while taking placebo. The cost-effectiveness

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018