Latest & greatest articles for anticoagulation

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Top results for anticoagulation

281. Anticoagulant therapy for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in pregnancy.

Anticoagulant therapy for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in pregnancy. BACKGROUND: Thromboembolic complications are much higher in pregnancy due to procoagulant changes. Heparin does not cross the placenta and the use of unfractionated heparin (UFH) is the current established practice in prophylaxis and treatment for thromboembolism in pregnancy. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness of anticoagulant therapies for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis in pregnancy. The anticoagulant drugs (...) identified by the search strategy. A minimum of two review authors independently assessed each study. MAIN RESULTS: We did not identify any eligible studies for inclusion in the review.We identified three potential studies; after assessing eligibility, we excluded all three as they did not meet the prespecified inclusion criteria. One study compared LMWH and UFH in pregnant women with previous thromboembolic events and, for most of these women, anticoagulants were used as thromboprophylaxis. There were

Cochrane2010

282. Patients may not need to stop oral anticoagulant therapy for simple oral surgical procedures

Patients may not need to stop oral anticoagulant therapy for simple oral surgical procedures Patients may not need to stop oral anticoagulant therapy for simple oral surgical procedures ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Make a difference with dentistry's premier charitable organization Take advantage of endorsed (...) Education About * Associated Topics Patients may not need to stop oral anticoagulant therapy for simple oral surgical procedures Ralph Rosenblum Jr. DDS, MHA . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy [OAT] did not experience a higher risk of post-operative bleeding compared to patients not on OAT or OAT patients who discontinue therapy following simple oral surgical procedures. Critical Summary Assessment The findings suggest that it is not necessary

ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry2010

283. Patients may not need to stop oral anticoagulant therapy for simple oral surgical procedures

Patients may not need to stop oral anticoagulant therapy for simple oral surgical procedures Patients may not need to stop oral anticoagulant therapy for simple oral surgical procedures ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Take advantage of endorsed, discounted business products Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Make a difference with dentistry's (...) Education About * Associated Topics Patients may not need to stop oral anticoagulant therapy for simple oral surgical procedures Ralph Rosenblum Jr. DDS, MHA . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy [OAT] did not experience a higher risk of post-operative bleeding compared to patients not on OAT or OAT patients who discontinue therapy following simple oral surgical procedures. Critical Summary Assessment The findings suggest that it is not necessary

ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry2010

284. Evidence note 27: Is patient self-monitoring (including self-testing and selfmanagement) of oral anticoagulation therapy safe, efficacious and cost-effective?

Evidence note 27: Is patient self-monitoring (including self-testing and selfmanagement) of oral anticoagulation therapy safe, efficacious and cost-effective?

NHS Quality Improvement Scotland2010

285. Chief of Service Rounds: Should You Always Stop Anticoagulating a Bleeding Patient?

Chief of Service Rounds: Should You Always Stop Anticoagulating a Bleeding Patient? Chief of Service Rounds: Should You Always Stop Anticoagulating a Bleeding Patient? | Clinical Correlations Chief of Service Rounds: Should You Always Stop Anticoagulating a Bleeding Patient? January 20, 2010 Chief-of-service rounds is a new feature of Clinical Correlations. Here we summarize Bellevue Hospital’s Chief of Service Rounds moderated by the Chief of Medicine, Nate Link, MD. This multidisciplinary (...) May 1;23(6):457-61. 4. Go AS. Anticoagulation therapy for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: how well do randomized trials translate into clinical practice? JAMA. 2003 Nov 26;290(20)2685-92. 5. Mant J et al. Warfarin versus aspirin for stroke prevention in an elderly community population with atrial fibrillation (the Birmingham Atrial Fibrillation Treatment of the Aged Study, BAFTA): a randomized controlled trial. The Lancet. Vol 370 Aug 1, 2007. 6. Shireman TI et al. Development

Clinical Correlations2010

286. Safety and benefits of protamine administration to revert anticoagulation soon after coronary angioplasty. A meta-analysis

Safety and benefits of protamine administration to revert anticoagulation soon after coronary angioplasty. A meta-analysis Safety and benefits of protamine administration to revert anticoagulation soon after coronary angioplasty. A meta-analysis. Safety and benefits of protamine administration to revert anticoagulation soon after coronary angioplasty. A meta-analysis. De Luca G, Parodi G, Antoniucci D CRD summary The authors concluded that protamine administration after percutaneous coronary (...) for inclusion. Trials were excluded where follow-up data were available in less than 90% of patients. The protamine dose was reported as 2mg in one study; in the other studies, this was based on the heparin/anticoagulant dose. Definitions of major bleeding complications varied. There were no details for patient characteristics. The authors did not state how many reviewers were involved in the selection of studies. Assessment of study quality The authors did not report whether they assessed

DARE.2010

287. Management of anticoagulation following central nervous system hemorrhage in patients with high thromboembolic risk

Management of anticoagulation following central nervous system hemorrhage in patients with high thromboembolic risk Management of anticoagulation following central nervous system hemorrhage in patients with high thromboembolic risk Management of anticoagulation following central nervous system hemorrhage in patients with high thromboembolic risk Hawryluk GW, Austin JW, Furlan JC, Lee JB, O'Kelly C, Fehlings MG CRD summary The review acknowledged the low quality of the evidence, but suggested (...) that it may be important to restart anticoagulation earlier than thought previously with the timing and intensity modified based on perceived individual risks. Further research was needed. Evidence limitations suggest that the findings should be interpreted with caution, but the authors' recommendation for further research seems appropriate. Authors' objectives To identify the optimal timing and intensity for anticoagulation re-initiation following central nervous system haemorrhage in patients with high

DARE.2010

288. Uninterrupted warfarin for periprocedural anticoagulation in catheter ablation of typical atrial flutter: a safe and cost-effective strategy

Uninterrupted warfarin for periprocedural anticoagulation in catheter ablation of typical atrial flutter: a safe and cost-effective strategy Uninterrupted warfarin for periprocedural anticoagulation in catheter ablation of typical atrial flutter: a safe and cost-effective strategy Uninterrupted warfarin for periprocedural anticoagulation in catheter ablation of typical atrial flutter: a safe and cost-effective strategy Finlay M, Sawhney V, Schilling R, Thomas G, Duncan E, Hunter R, Virdi G (...) readmission due to bleeding-related complications, while three on LMWH and 11 on warfarin underwent transoesophageal echocardiogram before the procedure. The total costs were £125 for LMWH and £108.5 for warfarin patients (p<0.0001). Authors' conclusions The authors concluded that uninterrupted warfarin was safer and more cost-effective for anticoagulation in catheter ablation for typical atrial flutter, compared with changing to LMWH before the procedure. CRD commentary Interventions: The two options

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2010

290. Anticoagulation for Venous Thromboembolism

Anticoagulation for Venous Thromboembolism Anticoagulation for Venous Thromboembolism – TheNNTTheNNT Anticoagulation Given for Acute Venous Thromboembolism (Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism) Unclear benefits vs. harms In Summary, for those who got the anticoagulation: Benefits in NNT 100% saw no benefit 0% were helped by being saved from death None were helped (life saved, preventing pulmonary embolism) Harms in NNT 0.9% were harmed by a major bleeding event 0.9% were harmed (...) addressing whether anticoagulation improves important clinical outcomes in patients with VTE (Nielson et al., 1994). Subjects were enrolled if they were ambulatory with symptomatic DVT. Half of the 90 subjects also had silent pulmonary emboli. Subjects were randomized to anticoagulation or NSAIDs and there was 1 fatal PE during the study period (anticoagulation group). In 1960, Barritt and Jordan performed a randomized trial evaluating anticoagulation for presumed PE. While the study is often cited

theNNT2010

291. [Intravenous thrombolytic treatment after acute stroke and secondary antithrombotic prevention treatment (antiplatelet and anticoagulant treatment) after stroke]

[Intravenous thrombolytic treatment after acute stroke and secondary antithrombotic prevention treatment (antiplatelet and anticoagulant treatment) after stroke] Intravenos trombolytisk behandling av hjerneinfarkt i akuttfasen og sekundaer blodproppforebyggende behandling (platehemmende behandling og antikoagulasjonsbehandling) etter hjerneslag [Intravenous thrombolytic treatment after acute stroke and secondary antithrombotic prevention treatment (antiplatelet and anticoagulant treatment (...) ) after stroke] Intravenos trombolytisk behandling av hjerneinfarkt i akuttfasen og sekundaer blodproppforebyggende behandling (platehemmende behandling og antikoagulasjonsbehandling) etter hjerneslag [Intravenous thrombolytic treatment after acute stroke and secondary antithrombotic prevention treatment (antiplatelet and anticoagulant treatment) after stroke] Wisloff T, Hamidi V, Ringerike T, Harboe I, Klemp M Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2010

292. Long-term effect of chronic oral anticoagulation with warfarin after acute myocardial infarction

Long-term effect of chronic oral anticoagulation with warfarin after acute myocardial infarction Long-term effect of chronic oral anticoagulation with warfarin after acute myocardial infarction Long-term effect of chronic oral anticoagulation with warfarin after acute myocardial infarction Haq SA, Heitner JF, Sacchi TJ, Brener SJ CRD summary This review concluded that long-term oral anticoagulation with warfarin did not reduce mortality or reinfarction after myocardial infarction, although (...) there was a significantly higher rate of bleeding balanced by a reduction in the rate of stroke. These conclusions follow from the presented evidence but, given limitations in the conduct and reporting of the review, they may not be reliable. Authors' objectives To evaluate the risk and benefit of long-term oral anticoagulation with warfarin after myocardial infarction. Searching PubMed and Ovid SR were searched for relevant evidence published in any language. Search terms were reported, but search dates were

DARE.2010

293. Different finite durations of anticoagulation and outcomes following idiopathic venous thromboembolism: a meta-analysis

Different finite durations of anticoagulation and outcomes following idiopathic venous thromboembolism: a meta-analysis Different finite durations of anticoagulation and outcomes following idiopathic venous thromboembolism: a meta-analysis Different finite durations of anticoagulation and outcomes following idiopathic venous thromboembolism: a meta-analysis Holley AB, King CS, Jackson JL, Moores LK CRD summary This review concluded that extending anticoagulation beyond three to six months (...) in people with idiopathic venous thromboembolism did not decrease recurrence of venous thromboembolism after treatment had stopped. A risk assessment should be undertaken before extending treatment. Questions about the quality of included data and use of indirect comparisons mean that the conclusions should be treated with caution. Authors' objectives To assess whether a longer course of anticoagulation offered any additional benefit over a short course in the initial treatment of the first episode

DARE.2010

294. Oral Dabigatran Etexilate: an Emerging Alternative to Conventional Anticoagulation Therapy

Oral Dabigatran Etexilate: an Emerging Alternative to Conventional Anticoagulation Therapy "Oral Dabigatran Etexilate: an Emerging Alternative to Conventional Ant" by Megan C. Merritt < > > > > > Title Author Date of Award 8-14-2010 Degree Type Capstone Project Degree Name Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies First Advisor James Ferguson PA-C, MPH Second Advisor Annjanette Sommers MS, PAC Third Advisor Rob Rosenow PharmD, OD Rights . Abstract Background: Thromboembolic events (...) are a substantial healthcare concern, both in hospital and community settings. The current standards of anticoagulation, heparin and warfarin, have well-demonstrated efficacy, but come with sizeable drawbacks. Heparin requires parenteral administration, and carries the risk of osteoporosis and severe thrombocyotopenia. Warfarin, the only oral anticoagulant available, gives inconsistent results, and thus requires frequent laboratory monitoring and adjustment. A fixed-dose oral anticoagulant would ease the burden

Pacific University EBM Capstone Project2010

295. Dentists may not need to lower the patient anticoagulation dose when performing minor dental surgery.

Dentists may not need to lower the patient anticoagulation dose when performing minor dental surgery. Dentists may not need to lower the patient anticoagulation dose when performing minor dental surgery. ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Make a difference with dentistry's premier charitable organization Take (...) website Evidence Education About * Associated Topics Dentists may not need to lower the patient anticoagulation dose when performing minor dental surgery. Francesco Chiappelli Ph.D; Michael Montgomery DDS; Juan F. Yepes DDS, MD, MPH, FDS RC . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Continuing the regular dose of warfarin therapy during minor dental surgery does not appear to increase the risk of bleeding compared to discontinuing or reducing the dose. Critical Summary Assessment A limited to RCTs finds

ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry2009

296. Dentists may not need to lower the patient anticoagulation dose when performing minor dental surgery.

Dentists may not need to lower the patient anticoagulation dose when performing minor dental surgery. Dentists may not need to lower the patient anticoagulation dose when performing minor dental surgery. ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Take advantage of endorsed, discounted business products Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Make a difference (...) Evidence Education About * Associated Topics Dentists may not need to lower the patient anticoagulation dose when performing minor dental surgery. Francesco Chiappelli Ph.D; Michael Montgomery DDS; Juan F. Yepes DDS, MD, MPH, FDS RC . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Continuing the regular dose of warfarin therapy during minor dental surgery does not appear to increase the risk of bleeding compared to discontinuing or reducing the dose. Critical Summary Assessment A limited to RCTs finds

ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry2009

297. Improved Oral Anticoagulation After a Dietary Vitamin K-Guided Strategy. A Randomized Controlled Trial

Improved Oral Anticoagulation After a Dietary Vitamin K-Guided Strategy. A Randomized Controlled Trial 19738137 2009 09 22 2009 10 08 2009 09 22 1524-4539 120 12 2009 Sep 22 Circulation Circulation Improved oral anticoagulation after a dietary vitamin k-guided strategy: a randomized controlled trial. 1115-22, 3 p following 1122 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.849208 Dietary vitamin K is thought to be an important factor that interferes with anticoagulation stability, but the clinical applicability (...) of this interaction has not been evaluated adequately in prospective studies. In a randomized controlled trial that enrolled outpatients with a recent international normalized ratio (INR) outside the therapeutic target, we compared 2 strategies to optimize long-term oral anticoagulation: (1) a conventional approach based on changes in anticoagulant prescription and (2) a dietary vitamin K-guided strategy based on simple modifications of the amount of vitamin K-rich foods ingested per week. The primary efficacy

EvidenceUpdates2009

298. The net clinical benefit of warfarin anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation.

The net clinical benefit of warfarin anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend warfarin use in patients with atrial fibrillation solely on the basis of risk for ischemic stroke without antithrombotic therapy. These guidelines rely on ischemic stroke rates observed in older trials and do not explicitly account for increased risk for hemorrhage. OBJECTIVE: To quantify the net clinical benefit of warfarin therapy in a cohort of patients with atrial fibrillation

Annals of Internal Medicine2009 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

299. Aspirin or anticoagulants for treating recurrent miscarriage in women without antiphospholipid syndrome.

Aspirin or anticoagulants for treating recurrent miscarriage in women without antiphospholipid syndrome. BACKGROUND: Since hypercoagulability might result in recurrent miscarriage, anticoagulant agents could potentially increase the live-birth rate in subsequent pregnancies in women with either inherited thrombophilia or unexplained recurrent miscarriage. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of anticoagulant agents, such as aspirin and heparin, in women with a history of at least two (...) the effect of anticoagulant treatment on the live-birth rate in women with a history of at least two miscarriages (up to 20 weeks of amenorrhoea) without apparent causes other than inherited thrombophilia were eligible. Interventions included aspirin, unfractionated heparin, and low molecular weight heparin for the prevention of miscarriage. One treatment could be compared with another or with placebo. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors assessed the trials for inclusion in the review and extracted

Cochrane2009

300. Is patient self-monitoring (including self-testing and selfmanagement) of oral anticoagulation therapy safe, efficacious and cost-effective?

Is patient self-monitoring (including self-testing and selfmanagement) of oral anticoagulation therapy safe, efficacious and cost-effective? Is patient self-monitoring (including self-testing and selfmanagement) of oral anticoagulation therapy safe, efficacious and cost-effective? Is patient self-monitoring (including self-testing and selfmanagement) of oral anticoagulation therapy safe, efficacious and cost-effective? Myles S Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health (...) technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Myles S. Is patient self-monitoring (including self-testing and selfmanagement) of oral anticoagulation therapy safe, efficacious and cost-effective? Glasgow: Quality Improvement Scotland (NHS QIS ). Evidence Note 27. 2009 Authors' conclusions Recent systematic reviews and meta analyses indicate that for selected and well trained patients, self-monitoring

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2009