Latest & greatest articles for antibiotics

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on antibiotics or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on antibiotics and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Antibiotics

Antibiotics also referred to as antibacterial are a type of medicine that prevents the growth of bacteria. As such they are used to treat infections caused by bacteria. They kill or prevents bacteria from spreading.

Antibiotics are vital in modern day medicine; they are among the most frequently prescribed drug. There are over a 100 types of antibiotics, the main types and most commonly prescribed are penicillin, cephalosporin, macrolides, fluoroquinolone and tetracycline. They tend to be classified by mechanism of action. So, those that target the bacterial cell wall (penicillins and cephalosporins) or the cell membrane (polymyxins), or interfere with essential bacterial enzymes (rifamycins, lipiarmycins, quinolones, and sulfonamides) have bactericidal activities. Antibiotics such as macrolides, lincosamides and tetracyclines inhibit protein synthesis.

Antibiotics can all be defined by their specificity. “Narrow-spectrum” antibiotics target specific types of bacteria, for instance gram-negative (-ve) or gram-positive (+ve), whereas broad-spectrum antibiotics affect a wide range of bacteria.

Antibiotics are increasingly suffering from antibiotic resistance caused by bacterial mutations meaning the bacteria evolves to not be sensitive to the specific antibiotics being used.

Clinical trials are important to the development and understanding of antibiotics and their side effects. Although they are deemed safe, over use of the drug can kill good bacteria and lead to antibiotic resistance. This halts the ability of bacteria and microorganisms to resist the effects of the antibiotic. Clinical trials and research allow scientists and medical professionals to study the effects and develop new antibiotics.

Trip has extensive coverage of the evidence base on antibiotics allowing users to easily find trusted answers. Coverage include guidelines, systematic reviews, controlled trials and evidence-based synopses.

Top results for antibiotics

281. The Utility of Procalcitonin-Guided Antibiotic Therapy in the Treatment of Lower Respiratory Tract Infections for Reducing Antibiotic Prescription Rate and Therapy Duration in Pediatrics

The Utility of Procalcitonin-Guided Antibiotic Therapy in the Treatment of Lower Respiratory Tract Infections for Reducing Antibiotic Prescription Rate and Therapy Duration in Pediatrics "The Utility of Procalcitonin-Guided Antibiotic Therapy in the Treatmen" by Amy L. Clark < > > > > > Title Author Date of Award Summer 8-8-2015 Degree Type Capstone Project Degree Name Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies First Advisor David Keene, MPAS, PA-C Rights . Abstract Background (...) : Procalcitonin (PCT) is a marker for bacterial infection that can be used as a diagnostic tool to help distinguish viral from bacterial lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). LRTI is a leading cause of illness in pediatrics worldwide. Most LRTIs in pediatrics are due to viral causes, yet conservative clinical guidelines advise empiric antibiotic therapy because there is no reliable method to determine the etiology of the illness. With the increasing threat of antibiotic resistance, efforts are underway

Pacific University EBM Capstone Project2015

282. Are Antibiotics Beneficial for the Treatment of Symptomatic Dental Infections?

Are Antibiotics Beneficial for the Treatment of Symptomatic Dental Infections? DEFINE_ME_WA This site requires Cookies to be enabled to function. Please ensure Cookies are turned on and then re-visit the desired page.

Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots2015

283. Does the Choice of Antibiotic Affect Outcome in Strep Throat?

Does the Choice of Antibiotic Affect Outcome in Strep Throat? DEFINE_ME_WA This site requires Cookies to be enabled to function. Please ensure Cookies are turned on and then re-visit the desired page.

Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots2015

284. Do Oral Antibiotics After Incision and Drainage of Simple Abscesses Improve Cure Rates?

Do Oral Antibiotics After Incision and Drainage of Simple Abscesses Improve Cure Rates? DEFINE_ME_WA This site requires Cookies to be enabled to function. Please ensure Cookies are turned on and then re-visit the desired page.

Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots2015

285. Are Antibiotics Effective in the Treatment of Acute Bronchitis?

Are Antibiotics Effective in the Treatment of Acute Bronchitis? DEFINE_ME_WA This site requires Cookies to be enabled to function. Please ensure Cookies are turned on and then re-visit the desired page.

Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots2015

286. Systematic review with meta analysis: The evidence for treating acute pyelonephritis with oral antibiotic therapy and short intravenous treatment is growing for low-risk children

Systematic review with meta analysis: The evidence for treating acute pyelonephritis with oral antibiotic therapy and short intravenous treatment is growing for low-risk children The evidence for treating acute pyelonephritis with oral antibiotic therapy and short intravenous treatment is growing for low-risk children | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal (...) accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here The evidence for treating acute pyelonephritis with oral antibiotic therapy and short intravenous treatment is growing for low-risk children Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Systematic

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2015

287. Randomised controlled trial: A fortified follow-up formula for 3?4-year-olds reduces episodes of acute respiratory infection and antibiotic use compared with cow?s milk

Randomised controlled trial: A fortified follow-up formula for 3?4-year-olds reduces episodes of acute respiratory infection and antibiotic use compared with cow?s milk A fortified follow-up formula for 3–4-year-olds reduces episodes of acute respiratory infection and antibiotic use compared with cow’s milk | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here A fortified follow-up formula for 3–4-year-olds reduces episodes of acute respiratory infection and antibiotic use compared with cow’s milk Article Text Child health Randomised controlled trial

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2015

290. Frequency of rescreening of patients positive for antibiotic resistant organisms: clinical evidence and guidelines

Frequency of rescreening of patients positive for antibiotic resistant organisms: clinical evidence and guidelines Frequency of rescreening of patients positive for antibiotic resistant organisms: clinical evidence and guidelines Frequency of rescreening of patients positive for antibiotic resistant organisms: clinical evidence and guidelines CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality (...) of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation CADTH. Frequency of rescreening of patients positive for antibiotic resistant organisms: clinical evidence and guidelines. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response. 2015 Authors' conclusions Four non-randomized studies regarding the frequency of rescreening of patients positive for antibiotic resistant organisms were identified. Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2015

291. Contact precautions for patients previously positive for antibiotic resistant organisms: guidelines

Contact precautions for patients previously positive for antibiotic resistant organisms: guidelines Contact precautions for patients previously positive for antibiotic resistant organisms: guidelines Contact precautions for patients previously positive for antibiotic resistant organisms: guidelines CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA (...) database. Citation CADTH. Contact precautions for patients previously positive for antibiotic resistant organisms: guidelines. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response. 2015 Authors' conclusions No evidence-based guidelines were identified regarding the management of patients in acute care who have previously tested positive, but are currently negative for antibiotic resistant organisms. Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2015

293. Quantitative other: A local public campaign reduces outpatient antibiotic prescribing in Italy

Quantitative other: A local public campaign reduces outpatient antibiotic prescribing in Italy A local public campaign reduces outpatient antibiotic prescribing in Italy | Evidence-Based Nursing This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu (...) Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here A local public campaign reduces outpatient antibiotic prescribing in Italy Article Text Primary healthcare Quantitative other A local public campaign reduces outpatient antibiotic prescribing in Italy Free Nick Francis Statistics from Altmetric.com No Altmetric data available for this article. Commentary on: Formoso G , Paltrinieri B

Evidence-Based Nursing (Requires free registration)2015

294. Antibiotic treatment for nontuberculous mycobacteria lung infection in people with cystic fibrosis.

Antibiotic treatment for nontuberculous mycobacteria lung infection in people with cystic fibrosis. BACKGROUND: Nontuberculous mycobacteria are mycobacteria, other than those in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, and are commonly found in the environment. Nontuberculous mycobacteria species (most commonly Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium abscessus) are isolated from the respiratory tract of approximately 5% to 20% of individuals with cystic fibrosis; they can cause lung (...) disease in people with cystic fibrosis leading to more a rapid decline in lung function and even death in certain circumstances. Although there are guidelines for the antimicrobial treatment of nontuberculous mycobacteria lung disease, these recommendations are not specific for people with cystic fibrosis and it is not clear which antibiotic regimen may be the most effective in the treatment of these patients. OBJECTIVES: The objective of our review was to compare antibiotic treatment to no antibiotic

Cochrane2014

295. Antibiotics Were More Effective Against Resistant Bacteria when Combined with Biologically Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles

Antibiotics Were More Effective Against Resistant Bacteria when Combined with Biologically Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles UTCAT2793, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Antibiotics Were More Effective Against Resistant Bacteria when Combined with Biologically Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles Clinical Question In patients with resistant microbial infections, can silver nanoparticles be combined (...) with antibiotics to improve the efficacy of antibacterial activity? Clinical Bottom Line In vitro studies demonstrate greater inhibition of drug resistant bacteria when antibiotics and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are conjugated. This is supported by results showing that biosynthesizing AgNPs with antibiotics were more effective against bacteria and at lower doses of antibiotic than when observing the effect of antibiotics alone. AgNP nanomedicine may offer an effective alternative strategy for managing

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2014

296. Antibiotic treatment of uncomplicated pyelonephritis in non-pregnant women

Antibiotic treatment of uncomplicated pyelonephritis in non-pregnant women Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Antibiotic treatment of uncomplicated pyelonephritis in non-pregnant women'', 1 December 2014 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Antibiotic treatment of uncomplicated pyelonephritis in non-pregnant women Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight (...) Antibiotic treatment of uncomplicated pyelonephritis in non-pregnant women The choice of antibiotic treatment for acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis in women should take resistance to antibiotics into account. Acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis is a bacterial kidney infection. It is more frequent in women than in men and is generally caused by the Escherichia coli bacterium. Pyelonephritis is suspected in cases of spontaneous lumbar pain or tenderness during palpation, combined with a high fever

Prescrire2014

298. Prophylactic antibiotics effective for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Prophylactic antibiotics effective for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Prophylactic antibiotics effective for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease | Cochrane Primary Care Top menu Trusted evidence. Informed decisions. Better health. Enter terms Prophylactic antibiotics effective for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Cochrane Trusted evidence. Informed decisions. Better health. Copyright © 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration | |

Cochrane PEARLS2014

299. On-the-spot test could reduce unnecessary antibiotics use

On-the-spot test could reduce unnecessary antibiotics use On-the-spot test could reduce unnecessary antibiotics use - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By November 7, 2014 // As the cold, damp weather arrives at last, our GP surgeries will be filling up with people suffering from acute respiratory infections (ARIs). Lots of them will come out with a prescription for antibiotics, despite the fact that the majority of these coughs and colds are caused by viruses and won’t be helped (...) by antibiotics. I think we’re becoming much more aware that antibiotics may not be the appropriate treatment for these illnesses, but the primary care doctor has a difficult course to navigate, trying to avoid under-prescribing to those who have severe bacterial infections and over-prescribing to those who don’t. There’s no way of being sure, there and then, which patient’s illness is bacterial and which viral. ‘Inappropriate’ prescribing: bad for you, bad for health budgets Antibiotic prescriptions

Evidently Cochrane2014

300. Antibiotic treatment for 6 weeks versus 12 weeks in patients with pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis: an open-label, non-inferiority, randomised, controlled trial.

Antibiotic treatment for 6 weeks versus 12 weeks in patients with pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis: an open-label, non-inferiority, randomised, controlled trial. BACKGROUND: Duration of treatment for patients with vertebral osteomyelitis is mainly based on expert recommendation rather than evidence. We aimed to establish whether 6 weeks of antibiotic treatment is non-inferior to 12 weeks in patients with pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis. METHODS: In this open-label, non-inferiority, randomised (...) controlled trial, we enrolled patients aged 18 years or older with microbiologically confirmed pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis and typical radiological features from 71 medical care centres across France. Patients were randomly assigned to either 6 weeks or 12 weeks of antibiotic treatment (physician's choice in accordance with French guidelines) by a computer-generated randomisation list of permuted blocks, stratified by centre. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who were classified

Lancet2014