Latest & greatest articles for antibiotics

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on antibiotics and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Antibiotics

Antibiotics also referred to as antibacterial are a type of medicine that prevents the growth of bacteria. As such they are used to treat infections caused by bacteria. They kill or prevents bacteria from spreading.

Antibiotics are vital in modern day medicine; they are among the most frequently prescribed drug. There are over a 100 types of antibiotics, the main types and most commonly prescribed are penicillin, cephalosporin, macrolides, fluoroquinolone and tetracycline. They tend to be classified by mechanism of action. So, those that target the bacterial cell wall (penicillins and cephalosporins) or the cell membrane (polymyxins), or interfere with essential bacterial enzymes (rifamycins, lipiarmycins, quinolones, and sulfonamides) have bactericidal activities. Antibiotics such as macrolides, lincosamides and tetracyclines inhibit protein synthesis.

Antibiotics can all be defined by their specificity. “Narrow-spectrum” antibiotics target specific types of bacteria, for instance gram-negative (-ve) or gram-positive (+ve), whereas broad-spectrum antibiotics affect a wide range of bacteria.

Antibiotics are increasingly suffering from antibiotic resistance caused by bacterial mutations meaning the bacteria evolves to not be sensitive to the specific antibiotics being used.

Clinical trials are important to the development and understanding of antibiotics and their side effects. Although they are deemed safe, over use of the drug can kill good bacteria and lead to antibiotic resistance. This halts the ability of bacteria and microorganisms to resist the effects of the antibiotic. Clinical trials and research allow scientists and medical professionals to study the effects and develop new antibiotics.

Trip has extensive coverage of the evidence base on antibiotics allowing users to easily find trusted answers. Coverage include guidelines, systematic reviews, controlled trials and evidence-based synopses.

Top results for antibiotics

181. Antibiotics for pediatric outpatients with community-acquired pneumonia

Antibiotics for pediatric outpatients with community-acquired pneumonia

DynaMed Plus2017

182. Antibiotics for pediatric inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia

Antibiotics for pediatric inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia

DynaMed Plus2017

184. Antibiotics for adult outpatients with community-acquired pneumonia

Antibiotics for adult outpatients with community-acquired pneumonia

DynaMed Plus2017

185. Antibiotics for adult inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia

Antibiotics for adult inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia

DynaMed Plus2017

189. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in obstetrical and gynecological procedures

Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in obstetrical and gynecological procedures

DynaMed Plus2017

191. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiothoracic procedures

Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiothoracic procedures

DynaMed Plus2017

193. XYDALBA (dalbavancin), antibiotic of the glycopeptide class

XYDALBA (dalbavancin), antibiotic of the glycopeptide class Haute Autorité de Santé - XYDALBA (dalbavancine), antibiotique de la classe des glycopeptides Contribuer à la régulation par la qualité et l'efficience Recherche Évaluation & Recommandation La HAS Accréditation & Certification Outils, Guides & Méthodes Agenda Avis sur les Médicaments XYDALBA (dalbavancine), antibiotique de la classe des glycopeptides Substance active (DCI) dalbavancine (chlorhydrate de) INFECTIOLOGIE - Nouveau

Haute Autorite de sante2017

194. Adjunctive antibiotics for drained skin abscesses improve clinical cure rate

Adjunctive antibiotics for drained skin abscesses improve clinical cure rate Adjunctive antibiotics for drained skin abscesses improve clinical cure rate | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts (...) Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Adjunctive antibiotics for drained skin abscesses improve clinical cure rate Article Text Commentary: General medicine Adjunctive antibiotics for drained skin abscesses improve clinical cure rate David A Talan Statistics from

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2017

195. Prescribing antibiotics to hospitalised patients increases the risk of Clostridium difficile infection for the next bed occupant

Prescribing antibiotics to hospitalised patients increases the risk of Clostridium difficile infection for the next bed occupant Prescribing antibiotics to hospitalised patients increases the risk of Clostridium difficile infection for the next bed occupant | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our (...) . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Prescribing antibiotics to hospitalised patients increases the risk of Clostridium difficile infection for the next bed occupant

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2017

196. Antibiotic utilisation in very low birth weight infants without sepsis or necrotising enterocolitis is associated with multiple adverse outcomes

Antibiotic utilisation in very low birth weight infants without sepsis or necrotising enterocolitis is associated with multiple adverse outcomes Antibiotic utilisation in very low birth weight infants without sepsis or necrotising enterocolitis is associated with multiple adverse outcomes | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how (...) we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Antibiotic utilisation in very low birth weight infants without sepsis or necrotising

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2017

197. Cohort study: Oral antibiotics are as effective as intravenous antibiotics for postdischarge treatment of complicated pneumonia in children

Cohort study: Oral antibiotics are as effective as intravenous antibiotics for postdischarge treatment of complicated pneumonia in children Oral antibiotics are as effective as intravenous antibiotics for postdischarge treatment of complicated pneumonia in children | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username (...) * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Oral antibiotics are as effective as intravenous antibiotics for postdischarge treatment of complicated pneumonia in children Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Cohort study Oral antibiotics are as effective as intravenous antibiotics

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2017

198. Randomised controlled trial: Clinical failure is more common in young children with acute otitis media who receive a short course of antibiotics compared with standard duration

Randomised controlled trial: Clinical failure is more common in young children with acute otitis media who receive a short course of antibiotics compared with standard duration Clinical failure is more common in young children with acute otitis media who receive a short course of antibiotics compared with standard duration | Evidence-Based Medicine This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Clinical failure is more common in young children with acute otitis media who receive a short course of antibiotics compared with standard duration Article Text Therapeutics

Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)2017

199. Oral antibiotics for secondary prophylaxis following two-stage revision surgery for prosthetic joint infection

Oral antibiotics for secondary prophylaxis following two-stage revision surgery for prosthetic joint infection Oral antibiotics for secondary prophylaxis following two-stage revision surgery for prosthetic joint infection Oral antibiotics for secondary prophylaxis following two-stage revision surgery for prosthetic joint infection Leas B, Mull, N. Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality (...) of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Leas B, Mull, N.. Oral antibiotics for secondary prophylaxis following two-stage revision surgery for prosthetic joint infection. Philadelphia: Center for Evidence-based Practice (CEP). 2017 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Anti-Bacterial Agents; Communicable Diseases; Humans; Joint Diseases; Prosthesis-Related Infections; Reoperation; Secondary Prevention Language Published English Country of organisation

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2017

200. Antibiotic treatment for nontuberculous mycobacteria lung infection in people with cystic fibrosis.

Antibiotic treatment for nontuberculous mycobacteria lung infection in people with cystic fibrosis. BACKGROUND: Nontuberculous mycobacteria are mycobacteria, other than those in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, and are commonly found in the environment. Nontuberculous mycobacteria species (most commonly Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium abscessus) are isolated from the respiratory tract of approximately 5% to 40% of individuals with cystic fibrosis; they can cause lung (...) disease in people with cystic fibrosis leading to more a rapid decline in lung function and even death in certain circumstances. Although there are guidelines for the antimicrobial treatment of nontuberculous mycobacteria lung disease, these recommendations are not specific for people with cystic fibrosis and it is not clear which antibiotic regimen may be the most effective in the treatment of these individuals. This is an update of a previous review. OBJECTIVES: The objective of our review

Cochrane2016