Latest & greatest articles for analgesia

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Analgesia

Analgesic drugs are used to provide analgesia, the inability to feel pain. There are numerous groups of analgesics including simple analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and opioids. Analgesics types are prescribed differently depending on the severity of pain relief needed.

The most common type of analgesic generally known and used is non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as paracetamol, aspirin and ibuprofen. Opioid drugs include morphine, codeine, oxycodone, dihydromorphine and pethidine.

Research shows that analgesic drugs have an effect on the peripheral and central nervous system, relieving pain without the loss of consciousness. Opioids are highly effect pain relievers however case studies prove they can be highly addictive. Therefore use should be guided by the World Health Organization (WHO) pain ladder which specifies mild analgesics as its first step.

Clinical trials and studies carried out across all groups of analgesia have proven the drugs are highly effective painkillers, opioids in particular. However, years of research and clinical trials conclude that some groups have significant side effects such as addiction or cardiovascular side effects. Research evidence is broad including clinical guidelines, systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials, case studies etc. These can easily be found via a search of the Trip Database.

Top results for analgesia

121. Epidural analgesia

Epidural analgesia Epidural analgesia | Great Ormond Street Hospital Navigation Search Search You are here Epidural analgesia Epidural analgesia pages here on our website. Abbreviations used in this document: mcg=micrograms; mg=milligrams; ml=millilitres; kg=kilograms. CNS=Clinical Nurse Specialist, CIVAS=central intravenous administration service, PCA=patient controlled analgesia, NCA=nurse controlled analgesia. Definition of terms: Advanced practitioner=a nurse who has attended the GOSH (...) Advanced Practice in Pain Management Training and been assessed as competent in adjusting epidural programming, changing syringes and troubleshooting technical problems. Pain Control Service=Pain team CNSs, or those deputising for them, eg anaesthetists. Preparation Patient assessment Initial assessment Prior to surgery/insertion of the epidural the anaesthetist will consider: The benefits and risks of an epidural for each individual patient ( ). The effectiveness of epidural analgesia for the type

Great Ormond Street Hospital2014

124. Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care

Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care | Great Ormond Street Hospital Navigation Search Search You are here Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care Analgesia: use of patient/proxy patient controlled analgesia in palliative care ; . These techniques are most commonly used following surgery ( ; ), but can also be effective (...) for the management of non-surgical pain such as sickle crisis, pancreatitis and cancer related pain ( ). More recently PCA and proxy PCA (PPCA), where analgesia is controlled by a parent or carer, has been reported to be effective in hospital and in the community setting in terminally ill children ( ; , ). The utilisation of PPCA has been restricted by historical concerns in relation to patient safety, with parental participation limited to assessment and reporting of their child’s pain to health care

Great Ormond Street Hospital2014

125. Results in analgesia - darwin 1, pharma 0.

Results in analgesia - darwin 1, pharma 0. Results in analgesia--Darwin 1, pharma 0. - PubMed - NCBI Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search Result Filters Format Summary Summary (text) Abstract Abstract (text) MEDLINE XML PMID List Apply Choose Destination File Clipboard Collections E-mail Order My Bibliography Citation manager Format Create File 1 selected item: 24369081 Format MeSH and Other Data E-mail Subject Additional text E-mail Add (...) to Clipboard Add to Collections Order articles Add to My Bibliography Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Create File 2013 Dec 26;369(26):2558-60. doi: 10.1056/NEJMcibr1313354. Results in analgesia--Darwin 1, pharma 0. . PMID: 24369081 DOI: [Indexed for MEDLINE] MeSH terms Substances Grant support Full Text Sources Medical PubMed Commons 0 comments How to cite this comment: Supplemental Content Full text links You are here: > > PubMed Simple NCBI Directory Getting Started

NEJM2013

126. Analgesia with breastfeeding in addition to skin-to-skin contact during heel prick

Analgesia with breastfeeding in addition to skin-to-skin contact during heel prick 23839984 2013 10 11 2013 12 05 2014 07 31 1468-2052 98 6 2013 Nov Archives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition Arch. Dis. Child. Fetal Neonatal Ed. Analgesia with breastfeeding in addition to skin-to-skin contact during heel prick. F499-503 10.1136/archdischild-2012-302921 To investigate the analgesic effect (measured with Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS)) of breastfeeding (BF) in addition (...) to skin-to-skin contact (SSC) versus other methods of non-pharmacological analgesia during blood sampling through heel lance in healthy term neonates. Randomised controlled trial. Tertiary level maternity ward. One hundred thirty-six healthy term newborns. healthy term neonates, wish to breastfeed and absence of feeding during the previous 60 min. Neonates were randomly assigned to four groups: Group breastfed with SSC (BF+SSC Group) (n=35); Group sucrose with SSC (Sucrose+SSC Group) (n=35); SSC Group

EvidenceUpdates2013

127. The efficacy of 2 doses of epidural morphine for postcesarean delivery analgesia: a randomized noninferiority trial

The efficacy of 2 doses of epidural morphine for postcesarean delivery analgesia: a randomized noninferiority trial 23921652 2013 08 22 2013 10 28 2015 07 14 1526-7598 117 3 2013 Sep Anesthesia and analgesia Anesth. Analg. The efficacy of 2 doses of epidural morphine for postcesarean delivery analgesia: a randomized noninferiority trial. 677-85 10.1213/ANE.0b013e31829cfd21 A single dose of epidural morphine is effective in reducing pain after cesarean delivery but is associated with adverse (...) effects. In this study, we sought to establish whether half the traditional dose of epidural morphine, when administered as part of a multimodal analgesia regimen after cesarean delivery, was associated with noninferior analgesia and fewer adverse effects. Ninety term parturients undergoing cesarean delivery under epidural anesthesia were enrolled in this randomized, double-blinded, noninferiority study. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either 3 mg epidural morphine or, half this dose, 1.5

EvidenceUpdates2013

128. Effects of continuous epidural anesthesia and postoperative epidural analgesia on pain management and stress response in patients undergoing major spinal surgery

Effects of continuous epidural anesthesia and postoperative epidural analgesia on pain management and stress response in patients undergoing major spinal surgery 23514874 2013 07 01 2014 01 24 2015 11 19 1528-1159 38 15 2013 Jul 01 Spine Spine Effects of continuous epidural anesthesia and postoperative epidural analgesia on pain management and stress response in patients undergoing major spinal surgery. 1324-30 10.1097/BRS.0b013e318290ff26 A prospective, randomized study was used to compare 2 (...) anesthesia/analgesia methods for reconstructive spine surgery. To assess the efficacy and influence of 2 anesthetic methods on clinical outcome and stress response during reconstructive spine surgery. Pain control is an important goal of the postoperative care after spinal surgery. Some prior studies have suggested that epidural anesthesia with or without postoperative epidural analgesia may blunt the surgical stress response after major surgery. This treatment approach has not been fully investigated

EvidenceUpdates2013

129. Analgesia for forceps delivery.

Analgesia for forceps delivery. BACKGROUND: A forceps delivery may be indicated when a fetus fails to progress to delivery, or when delivery needs to be expedited in the second stage of labour. Effective analgesia is required to ensure that the woman is comfortable throughout the delivery, to allow the obstetrician to safely perform the procedure. It is currently unclear what the most effective and safe agent or method is to provide pain relief during forceps delivery. OBJECTIVES: To assess (...) the effectiveness and safety of different analgesic agents and methods available for forceps delivery for women and their babies. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 July 2013), reviewed published guidelines and searched the reference lists of review articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials comparing an analgesic agent or method used for forceps delivery with placebo/no treatment or an alternative agent or method. DATA COLLECTION

Cochrane2013

130. Prophylactic Compared With Therapeutic Ibuprofen Analgesia in First-Trimester Medical Abortion: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Prophylactic Compared With Therapeutic Ibuprofen Analgesia in First-Trimester Medical Abortion: A Randomized Controlled Trial 23921857 2013 08 21 2013 11 13 2013 11 21 1873-233X 122 3 2013 Sep Obstetrics and gynecology Obstet Gynecol Prophylactic compared with therapeutic ibuprofen analgesia in first-trimester medical abortion: a randomized controlled trial. 558-64 10.1097/AOG.0b013e31829d5a33 To compare the effectiveness of two oral analgesic regimens in first-trimester medical abortion. We (...) was not statistically significant (P=.87, adjusted for site). Duration of pain, verbal pain ratings reported at follow-up, and use of other analgesics did not differ significantly by group (all P>.05). No significant benefit of the prophylactic regimen was apparent in any population subgroup. Abortion failure and ibuprofen side effects in the two groups were similar. We found no evidence that prophylactic administration of ibuprofen reduces pain severity or duration in first-trimester medical abortion. The average

EvidenceUpdates2013

131. Analgesia after total knee replacement: local infiltration versus epidural combined with a femoral nerve blockade: a prospective, randomised pragmatic trial

Analgesia after total knee replacement: local infiltration versus epidural combined with a femoral nerve blockade: a prospective, randomised pragmatic trial 23632672 2013 05 01 2013 06 24 2016 10 19 2049-4408 95-B 5 2013 May The bone & joint journal Bone Joint J Analgesia after total knee replacement: local infiltration versus epidural combined with a femoral nerve blockade: a prospective, randomised pragmatic trial. 629-35 10.1302/0301-620X.95B5.30406 In a randomised controlled pragmatic trial (...) we investigated whether local infiltration analgesia would result in earlier readiness for discharge from hospital after total knee replacement (TKR) than patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) plus femoral nerve block. A total of 45 patients with a mean age of 65 years (49 to 81) received a local infiltration with a peri-articular injection of bupivacaine, morphine and methylprednisolone, as well as adjuvant analgesics. In 45 PCEA+femoral nerve blockade patients with a mean age of 67 years

EvidenceUpdates2013 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

132. Comparing effects of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia and intravenous injection in patients who have undergone total hysterectomy

Comparing effects of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia and intravenous injection in patients who have undergone total hysterectomy 23656176 2014 03 10 2015 04 06 2015 06 08 1365-2702 23 7-8 2014 Apr Journal of clinical nursing J Clin Nurs Comparing effects of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia and intravenous injection in patients who have undergone total hysterectomy. 967-75 10.1111/jocn.12221 To compare the effects of two pain management methods, intravenous patient-controlled (...) analgesia and conventional intravenous injection, in terms of pain level, adverse reactions experienced, nursing care time spent for pain management, satisfaction with pain management and total cost of pain management for patients who underwent total abdominal hysterectomy. Patient-controlled intravenous analgesia has been used most commonly for management of postoperative pain. Although it can be very effective in management of postoperative pain, patients still complained of many adverse reactions

EvidenceUpdates2013

133. Efficacy of Multimodal Perioperative Analgesia Protocol With Periarticular Medication Injection in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized, Double-Blinded Study

Efficacy of Multimodal Perioperative Analgesia Protocol With Periarticular Medication Injection in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized, Double-Blinded Study 23608085 2013 09 03 2014 05 12 2015 01 15 1532-8406 28 8 2013 Sep The Journal of arthroplasty J Arthroplasty Efficacy of multimodal perioperative analgesia protocol with periarticular medication injection in total knee arthroplasty: a randomized, double-blinded study. 1274-7 10.1016/j.arth.2013.03.008 S0883-5403(13)00250-7 Pain control (...) . Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Kelley Todd C TC Department of Orthopaedics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. Adams Mary Jo MJ Mulliken Brian D BD Dalury David F DF eng Journal Article Randomized Controlled Trial 2013 04 20 United States J Arthroplasty 8703515 0883-5403 0 Amides 0 Analgesics 7IO5LYA57N ropivacaine MN3L5RMN02 Clonidine YKH834O4BH Epinephrine YZI5105V0L Ketorolac IM J Arthroplasty. 2014 Oct;29(10):2057 Adult Aged Aged, 80 and over Amides administration

EvidenceUpdates2013

134. A randomized controlled comparison of epidural analgesia and combined spinal-epidural analgesia in a private practice setting: pain scores during first and second stages of labor and at delivery

A randomized controlled comparison of epidural analgesia and combined spinal-epidural analgesia in a private practice setting: pain scores during first and second stages of labor and at delivery 23400985 2013 02 26 2013 06 12 2013 02 26 1526-7598 116 3 2013 Mar Anesthesia and analgesia Anesth. Analg. A randomized controlled comparison of epidural analgesia and combined spinal-epidural analgesia in a private practice setting: pain scores during first and second stages of labor and at delivery (...) . 636-43 10.1213/ANE.0b013e31827e4e29 There has been no prospective evaluation of combined spinal-epidural (CSE) analgesia in a private practice setting and few studies have focused on pain relief during the second stage of labor and at delivery. In this randomized controlled trial, we compared verbal pain scores during the first and second stages of labor and at delivery in women receiving CSE or traditional epidural analgesia at a busy private maternity hospital. Healthy, term parturients received

EvidenceUpdates2013

135. Epidural versus continuous preperitoneal analgesia during fast-track open colorectal surgery: a randomized controlled trial

Epidural versus continuous preperitoneal analgesia during fast-track open colorectal surgery: a randomized controlled trial 23426208 2013 02 21 2013 04 19 2013 10 07 1528-1175 118 3 2013 Mar Anesthesiology Anesthesiology Epidural versus continuous preperitoneal analgesia during fast-track open colorectal surgery: a randomized controlled trial. 622-30 10.1097/ALN.0b013e3182800d94 Effective postoperative analgesia is essential for early rehabilitation after surgery. Continuous wound infiltration (...) (CWI) of local anesthetics has been proposed as an alternative to epidural analgesia (EA) during colorectal surgery. This prospective, double-blind trial compared CWI and EA in patients undergoing elective open colorectal surgery. Fifty consecutive patients were randomized to receive EA or CWI for 48 h. In both groups, patients were managed according to Enhanced Recovery After Surgery recommendations. The primary outcome was the dynamic pain score measured during mobilization 24 h after surgery

EvidenceUpdates2013

136. Effect of Postoperative Analgesia on Energy Metabolism and Role of Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors for Postoperative Pain Management After Abdominal Surgery in Adults

Effect of Postoperative Analgesia on Energy Metabolism and Role of Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors for Postoperative Pain Management After Abdominal Surgery in Adults 23328338 2013 06 05 2014 01 06 2013 06 05 1536-5409 29 7 2013 Jul The Clinical journal of pain Clin J Pain Effect of postoperative analgesia on energy metabolism and role of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for postoperative pain management after abdominal surgery in adults. 570-6 10.1097/AJP.0b013e318270f97b It is questionable whether (...) the stress response to surgery is necessary. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of postoperative analgesia on energy metabolism and compare cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor with tramadol in postoperative pain management after major abdominal surgery. A total of 112 patients undergoing major abdominal surgery were randomly assigned to one of the 4 treatment groups before surgery. Then, patients were scheduled to receive different analgesic drugs after surgery: group

EvidenceUpdates2013

137. For Patients With Dental Pain, Combination Therapy With Ibuprofen And Acetaminophen Is More Effective In Producing Analgesia Than Monotherapy With Ibuprofen Alone

For Patients With Dental Pain, Combination Therapy With Ibuprofen And Acetaminophen Is More Effective In Producing Analgesia Than Monotherapy With Ibuprofen Alone UTCAT2379, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title For Patients With Dental Pain, Combination Therapy With Ibuprofen And Acetaminophen Is More Effective In Producing Analgesia Than Monotherapy With Ibuprofen Alone Clinical Question In patients (...) with inflammatory pain, does the combination of ibuprofen and acetaminophen compared to ibuprofen alone produce greater analgesia? Clinical Bottom Line Combination therapy with ibuprofen and acetaminophen produces greater analgesia than ibuprofen alone in patients with inflammatory pain. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Daniels/2011 678 patients at least 16 years old with at least 3 impacted 3rd

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2013

138. Comparing the Analgesia Effects of Single-injection and Continuous Femoral Nerve Blocks with Patient Controlled Analgesia after Total Knee Arthroplasty

Comparing the Analgesia Effects of Single-injection and Continuous Femoral Nerve Blocks with Patient Controlled Analgesia after Total Knee Arthroplasty 23142441 2013 03 18 2013 09 30 2013 03 18 1532-8406 28 4 2013 Apr The Journal of arthroplasty J Arthroplasty Comparing the analgesia effects of single-injection and continuous femoral nerve blocks with patient controlled analgesia after total knee arthroplasty. 608-13 10.1016/j.arth.2012.06.039 S0883-5403(12)00531-1 We compared the analgesic (...) effects of single-injection or continuous femoral nerve block (FNB) with intravenous patient controlled analgesia (PCA) opioids. Two hundred patients undergoing knee arthroplasty were randomized to one of the three regimens. Significant knee pain on movement at postoperative 24h was reduced with single-injection (OR 0.30; 95% CI 0.12 to 0.74; P=0.009) or continuous (OR 0.21; 95% CI 0.08 to 0.51; P=0.001) FNB, compared with PCA. Allocation to FNBs also resulted in significantly less opioid consumption

EvidenceUpdates2013

139. Antihistamine agents added to opioid analgesia

Antihistamine agents added to opioid analgesia Antihistamine agents added to opioid analgesia Antihistamine agents added to opioid analgesia Leas B, Williams K Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Leas B, Williams K. Antihistamine agents added to opioid analgesia. Philadelphia: Center for Evidence-based Practice (CEP). 2013 Final publication URL (...) Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Analgesics, Opioid; Histamine Antagonists; Humans Language Published English Country of organisation United States English summary An English language summary is available. Address for correspondence Center for Evidence-based Practice, University of Pennsylvania Health System, 3535 Market St. Suite 50, Philadelphia PA 19104 Email: Cep2@uphs.upenn.edu AccessionNumber 32014000613 Date abstract record published 17/06/2014 Health Technology Assessment

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2013

140. Local Infiltration Analgesia in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: A Rapid Review

Local Infiltration Analgesia in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: A Rapid Review Local infiltration analgesia in hip and knee arthroplasty: a rapid review Local infiltration analgesia in hip and knee arthroplasty: a rapid review Brener S Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Brener S. Local infiltration analgesia in hip and knee (...) arthroplasty: a rapid review. Toronto: Health Quality Ontario (HQO). Rapid Review. 2013 Authors' objectives The objective of this rapid review was to examine the effectiveness of local infiltration analgesia in patients who have undergone primary hip arthroplasty or primary knee arthroplasty. Authors' conclusions Based on very low quality of evidence: The results for the impact of local infiltration analgesia on pain in patients undergoing either total hip or knee arthroplasty were inconsistent

Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.2013