Latest & greatest articles for analgesia

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on analgesia and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Analgesia

Analgesic drugs are used to provide analgesia, the inability to feel pain. There are numerous groups of analgesics including simple analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and opioids. Analgesics types are prescribed differently depending on the severity of pain relief needed.

The most common type of analgesic generally known and used is non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as paracetamol, aspirin and ibuprofen. Opioid drugs include morphine, codeine, oxycodone, dihydromorphine and pethidine.

Research shows that analgesic drugs have an effect on the peripheral and central nervous system, relieving pain without the loss of consciousness. Opioids are highly effect pain relievers however case studies prove they can be highly addictive. Therefore use should be guided by the World Health Organization (WHO) pain ladder which specifies mild analgesics as its first step.

Clinical trials and studies carried out across all groups of analgesia have proven the drugs are highly effective painkillers, opioids in particular. However, years of research and clinical trials conclude that some groups have significant side effects such as addiction or cardiovascular side effects. Research evidence is broad including clinical guidelines, systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials, case studies etc. These can easily be found via a search of the Trip Database.

Top results for analgesia

341. Double-blind controlled trial of indomethacin as an adjunct to narcotic analgesia after major abdominal surgery.

Double-blind controlled trial of indomethacin as an adjunct to narcotic analgesia after major abdominal surgery. 6123836 1982 08 26 1982 08 26 2015 06 16 0140-6736 2 8290 1982 Jul 17 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Double-blind controlled trial of indomethacin as an adjunct to narcotic analgesia after major abdominal surgery. 115-8 A prospective randomised trial was undertaken to assess the efficacy of indomethacin as an analgesic after abdominal surgery. 44 patients received indomethacin (...) suppositories (100 mg every 8 h for three days postoperatively) and 46 patients received placebo suppositories (every 8 h for the same period), in addition to intramuscular morphine (0.15 mg/kg every 4 h as required). Postoperative subjective pain assessments, analgesic requirements, and respiratory function were recorded. Patients receiving indomethacin required significantly fewer doses of morphine than those receiving placebo and has less pain on each of the first four postoperative days. The duration

Lancet1982

342. The mechanism of placebo analgesia.

The mechanism of placebo analgesia. 80579 1978 11 18 1978 11 18 2015 06 16 0140-6736 2 8091 1978 Sep 23 Lancet (London, England) Lancet The mechanism of placebo analgesia. 654-7 The effect of naloxone on dental postoperative pain was studied to examine the hypothesis that endorphins mediate placebo analgesia. All patients had extraction of impacted mandibular third molars with diazepam, N2O, and local block with mepivacaine. 3 h and 4 h after surgery naloxone or a placebo was given under (...) rating identical to that of responders who received naloxone as their second drug. Thus the enhancement of reported pain produced by naloxone can be entirely accounted for by its effect on placebo responders. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that endorphin release mediates placebo analgesia for dental postoperative pain. Levine J D JD Gordon N C NC Fields H L HL eng Clinical Trial Comparative Study Journal Article Randomized Controlled Trial Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S. England

Lancet1978

343. A double-blind trial of patient-controlled nitrous-oxide/oxygen analgesia in myocardial infarction.

A double-blind trial of patient-controlled nitrous-oxide/oxygen analgesia in myocardial infarction. 49560 1975 10 03 1975 10 03 2016 11 23 0140-6736 1 7922 1975 Jun 28 Lancet (London, England) Lancet A double-blind trial of patient-controlled nitrous-oxide/oxygen analgesia in myocardial infarction. 1397-400 The analgesic effect of self-administered nitrous oxide 50%/oxygen 50% ('Entonox" analgesic apparatus) was compared with air given by the same method in a double-blind trial in 81 patients (...) K50XQU1029 Nitrous Oxide S88TT14065 Oxygen AIM IM Adult Aged Air Analgesia instrumentation Clinical Trials as Topic Community Participation Coronary Care Units Evaluation Studies as Topic Female Humans Male Middle Aged Myocardial Infarction complications Nitrous Oxide administration & dosage pharmacology Oxygen administration & dosage pharmacology Pain etiology Pain Management Placebos Scotland Self-Help Devices Time Factors 1975 6 28 1975 6 28 0 1 1975 6 28 0 0 ppublish 49560 S0140-6736(75)92606-9

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