Latest & greatest articles for anaesthesia

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on anaesthesia and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Anaesthesia

Clinical Anaesthesia is used to induce a temporary medical state of controlled unconsciousness, inducing a loss of sensation or awareness. There are three main types of Anaesthesia:

  • Local and Regional
  • General
  • Sedation

Anaesthesia is primarily used during surgical procedures to block pain. While unconscious, blood flow and heart rate is monitored.

Research and development in the use of Anaesthesia has helped anesthesiologists in the progression of patient safety before and after surgery and medical procedures. The developments and research of Anaesthesia through the years has massively influences medicine and surgery today.

Case studies and clinical trials help aid researchers in the development of aftercare during postoperative recovery. Research is a vital part in the field of Anaesthesia, it allows anesthesiologists to improve the delivery of patient safety while unconscious.

Learn more on the emerging technology in Anaesthesia and the advancements in Anaesthesia practise by searching Trip.

Top results for anaesthesia

1. The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy and the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Joint Committee Practice Advisory on Controversial Topics in Pediatric Regional Anesthesia

The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy and the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Joint Committee Practice Advisory on Controversial Topics in Pediatric Regional Anesthesia The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therap... : Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Login No user account? Lippincott Journals Subscribers (...) your personal information without your express consent. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. Toggle navigation Articles & Issues Collections For Authors Journal Info > > The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therap... Email to a Colleague Colleague's E-mail is Invalid Your Name: (optional) Your Email: Colleague's Email: Separate multiple e-mails with a (;). Message: Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine. Send

2015 American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

2. Local anaesthetics and regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia for preventing persistent postoperative pain in adults and children. (PubMed)

Local anaesthetics and regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia for preventing persistent postoperative pain in adults and children. Regional anaesthesia may reduce the rate of persistent postoperative pain (PPP), a frequent and debilitating condition. This review was originally published in 2012 and updated in 2017.To compare local anaesthetics and regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia for the prevention of PPP beyond three months in adults and children undergoing (...) registry for related systematic reviews.We included RCTs comparing local or regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia with a pain outcome beyond three months after elective, non-orthopaedic surgery.At least two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data and adverse events. We contacted study authors for additional information. We presented outcomes as pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), based on random-effects models (inverse variance

2018 Cochrane

3. Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours

Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours Discover Portal Discover Portal Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours Published on 15 March 2016 doi: Neuraxial anaesthesia, administered around the nerves (...) in the spine, was found to be as safe as general anaesthesia for people undergoing total hip or knee replacements. This review found a similar risk of dying, infection, nerve damage and blood clots in people regardless of the type of anaesthesia. Hospital stay was reduced on average by 0.4 days in the neuraxial anaesthesia group, though the significance to patients or impact on costs was not explored. Using neuraxial anaesthesia took no longer to perform than general anaesthesia. Hip and knee replacements

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

4. Maternal position in the second stage of labour for women with epidural anaesthesia. (PubMed)

Maternal position in the second stage of labour for women with epidural anaesthesia. Epidural analgesia in labour prolongs the second stage and increases instrumental delivery. It has been suggested that a more upright maternal position during all or part of the second stage may counteract these adverse effects. This is an update of a Cochrane Review published in 2017.To assess the effects of different birthing positions (upright or recumbent) during the second stage of labour, on maternal

2018 Cochrane

5. Regional versus local anaesthesia for arteriovenous fistula creation in end-stage renal disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Regional versus local anaesthesia for arteriovenous fistula creation in end-stage renal disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne

2016 PROSPERO

6. Injectable local anaesthetic agents for dental anaesthesia. (PubMed)

Injectable local anaesthetic agents for dental anaesthesia. Pain during dental treatment, which is a common fear of patients, can be controlled successfully by local anaesthetic. Several different local anaesthetic formulations and techniques are available to dentists.Our primary objectives were to compare the success of anaesthesia, the speed of onset and duration of anaesthesia, and systemic and local adverse effects amongst different local anaesthetic formulations for dental anaesthesia. We (...) define success of anaesthesia as absence of pain during a dental procedure, or a negative response to electric pulp testing or other simulated scenario tests. We define dental anaesthesia as anaesthesia given at the time of any dental intervention.Our secondary objective was to report on patients' experience of the procedures carried out.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; the Cochrane Library; 2018, Issue 1), MEDLINE (OVID SP), Embase, CINAHL PLUS, WEB OF SCIENCE

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2018 Cochrane

7. Topical anaesthesia for needle-related pain in newborn infants. (PubMed)

Topical anaesthesia for needle-related pain in newborn infants. Hospitalised newborn neonates frequently undergo painful invasive procedures that involve penetration of the skin and other tissues by a needle. One intervention that can be used prior to a needle insertion procedure is application of a topical local anaesthetic.To evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical anaesthetics such as amethocaine and EMLA in newborn term or preterm infants requiring an invasive procedure involving

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2017 Cochrane

8. APA Consensus Statement on updated fluid fasting guidelines for children prior to elective general anaesthesia

APA Consensus Statement on updated fluid fasting guidelines for children prior to elective general anaesthesia ‘We the undersigned representatives of our respective national societies agree that, based on the current convincing evidence base, unless there is a clear contra-indication, it is safe and recommended for all children able to take clear fluids*, to be allowed and encouraged to have them up to one hour before elective general anaesthesia’ Charles Stack, President, Association

2018 Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland

9. Guidelines on Infection Control in Anaesthesia

Guidelines on Infection Control in Anaesthesia PS28 2015 Page 1 PS28 2015 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Guidelines on Infection Control in Anaesthesia 1. PURPOSE The Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) aims to ensure that the practice of anaesthesia is as safe as possible for patients, anaesthetists and other healthcare workers. Infection control aimed at minimising risks of infection is central to this aim. The goal of these guidelines (...) is to assist practitioners and facilities to implement strategies that will reduce risks of transmission of infection, based on current evidence. In certain clinical situations there may be a need to adopt more stringent practices. These guidelines should be considered with documents on this subject issued by other authorities, and in particular local infection control policies. 2. SCOPE OF THIS DOCUMENT This document is intended to apply in all areas where anaesthesia, including regional analgesia

2015 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

10. Local anaesthetics and regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia for preventing persistent postoperative pain in adults and children. (PubMed)

Local anaesthetics and regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia for preventing persistent postoperative pain in adults and children. Regional anaesthesia may reduce the rate of persistent postoperative pain (PPP), a frequent and debilitating condition. This review was originally published in 2012 and updated in 2017.To compare local anaesthetics and regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia for the prevention of PPP beyond three months in adults and children undergoing (...) registry for related systematic reviews.We included RCTs comparing local or regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia with a pain outcome beyond three months after elective, non-orthopaedic surgery.At least two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data and adverse events. We contacted study authors for additional information. We presented outcomes as pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), based on random-effects models (inverse variance

2018 Cochrane

11. Total intravenous anaesthesia versus inhalational anaesthesia for adults undergoing transabdominal robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery. (PubMed)

Total intravenous anaesthesia versus inhalational anaesthesia for adults undergoing transabdominal robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery. Rapid implementation of robotic transabdominal surgery has resulted in the need for re-evaluation of the most suitable form of anaesthesia. The overall objective of anaesthesia is to minimize perioperative risk and discomfort for patients both during and after surgery. Anaesthesia for patients undergoing robotic assisted surgery is different from anaesthesia (...) for patients undergoing open or laparoscopic surgery; new anaesthetic concerns accompany robotic assisted surgery.To assess outcomes related to the choice of total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) or inhalational anaesthesia for adults undergoing transabdominal robotic assisted laparoscopic gynaecological, urological or gastroenterological surgery.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016 Issue 5), Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to May 2016), Embase via OvidSP (1982 to May 2016

2017 Cochrane

12. Non-pharmacological interventions for assisting the induction of anaesthesia in children. (PubMed)

Non-pharmacological interventions for assisting the induction of anaesthesia in children. Induction of general anaesthesia can be distressing for children. Non-pharmacological methods for reducing anxiety and improving co-operation may avoid the adverse effects of preoperative sedation.To assess the effects of non-pharmacological interventions in assisting induction of anaesthesia in children by reducing their anxiety, distress or increasing their co-operation.In this updated review we searched (...) in trials.We included 28 trials (2681 children) investigating 17 interventions of interest; all trials were conducted in high-income countries. Overall we judged the trials to be at high risk of bias. Except for parental acupuncture (graded low), all other GRADE assessments of the primary outcomes of comparisons were very low, indicating a high degree of uncertainty about the overall findings. Parental presence: In five trials (557 children), parental presence at induction of anaesthesia did not reduce

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2015 Cochrane

13. Training in intraoperative handover and display of a checklist improve communication during transfer of care: An interventional cohort study of anaesthesia residents and nurse anaesthetists. (PubMed)

Training in intraoperative handover and display of a checklist improve communication during transfer of care: An interventional cohort study of anaesthesia residents and nurse anaesthetists. Handovers during anaesthesia are common, and failures in communication may lead to morbidity and mortality.We hypothesised that intraoperative handover training and display of a checklist would improve communication during anaesthesia care transition in the operating room.Interventional cohort study.Single (...) -centre tertiary care university hospital.A total of 204 random observations of handovers between anaesthesia providers (residents and nurse anaesthetists) over a 6-month period in 2016.Two geographically different hospital sites were studied simultaneously (same observations, but no training/checklist at the control site): first a 2-week 'baseline' observation period; then handover training and display of checklists in each operating room (at the intervention site only) followed by an 'immediate

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2017 European Journal of Anaesthesiology

14. Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery

Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery Discover Portal Discover Portal Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery Published on 27 September 2016 doi: High quality evidence suggests that an epidural anaesthetic (with or without an opioid) promotes the return of gut function after abdominal surgery. This is when compared to an opioid based regimen (...) and may reduce the need for opioids. This updated Cochrane review compared the effects of giving an epidural anaesthetic with giving opioids after abdominal surgery. Opioids could either be injected directly into the bloodstream or given through an epidural. What did this study do? The review pooled the results of 94 randomised controlled trials including 5,846 adults undergoing any form of abdominal surgery under general anaesthesia. Treatment groups received an epidural containing local anaesthetic

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

15. Evaluation of Early Warning Scoring System and Nursing Guide Application in Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit. (PubMed)

Evaluation of Early Warning Scoring System and Nursing Guide Application in Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit. To determine the effect of nursing guide application developed for the present study and to evaluate the Early Warning Scoring System (EWSS) in post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU).The study was carried out as a randomised-controlled experimental study. The study sample comprised of 123 adult patients having thoracic and abdominal surgery between January 2011 and April 2011

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2016 Turkish journal of anaesthesiology and reanimation Controlled trial quality: uncertain

16. Does regional anaesthesia improve outcome after total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review

Does regional anaesthesia improve outcome after total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.

17. Guidelines for the Safe Management and Use of Medications in Anaesthesia

Guidelines for the Safe Management and Use of Medications in Anaesthesia PS51 2018 Page 1 PS51 2018 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Guidelines for the Safe Management and Use of Medications in Anaesthesia 1. INTRODUCTION The safe administration of drugs in anaesthesia encompasses the timely administration of medication to patients, the prevention of drug administration errors, and measures to reduce the opportunity to misdirect drugs. Estimates of the frequency (...) of 'medication errors' range from 1 in 20 administration events 1 , to 1 in 133 2 anaesthesia episodes. Many of these reported events were protocol or process errors (including mislabelling or omission of an appropriate drug), however a proportion of these errors will result in an adverse event for the patient. More than 3 million anaesthetics are administered in Australia and New Zealand annually suggesting a substantial contribution to iatrogenic adverse events. Anaesthetists must be aware

2017 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

18. Guidelines on Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement in Anaesthesia

Guidelines on Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement in Anaesthesia PS58 2018 Page 1 PS58 2018 Guidelines on Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement in Anaesthesia 1. PURPOSE The aim of these guidelines is to assist practitioners in achieving the highest quality of care for their patients through an understanding of Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Improvement (QI). 2. INTRODUCTION 2.1. It is incumbent upon Fellows at an individual, departmental and institutional level to contribute (...) responsibility for all clinicians. Compliance with the College’s CPD standard is mandated by the Medical Board of Australia for all registered specialist anaesthetists and specialist pain medicine physicians practising in Australia, and participation in the program is mandated by the Medical Council of New Zealand for vocationally registered anaesthetists and pain medicine physicians practising in New Zealand. 2.7. Research underpins the scientific advances that progress anaesthesia, pain management

2016 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

19. Techniques for preventing hypotension during spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. (PubMed)

Techniques for preventing hypotension during spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. Maternal hypotension is the most frequent complication of spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. It can be associated with nausea or vomiting and may pose serious risks to the mother (unconsciousness, pulmonary aspiration) and baby (hypoxia, acidosis, neurological injury).To assess the effects of prophylactic interventions for hypotension following spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section.We searched (...) Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register (9 August 2016) and reference lists of retrieved studies.Randomised controlled trials, including full texts and abstracts, comparing interventions to prevent hypotension with placebo or alternative treatment in women having spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. We excluded studies if hypotension was not an outcome measure.Two review authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data from eligible studies. We report 'Summary

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2017 Cochrane

20. Position in the second stage of labour for women without epidural anaesthesia. (PubMed)

Position in the second stage of labour for women without epidural anaesthesia. For centuries, there has been controversy around whether being upright (sitting, birthing stools, chairs, squatting, kneeling) or lying down (lateral (Sim's) position, semi-recumbent, lithotomy position, Trendelenburg's position) have advantages for women giving birth to their babies. This is an update of a review previously published in 2012, 2004 and 1999.To determine the possible benefits and risks of the use (...) of different birth positions during the second stage of labour without epidural anaesthesia, on maternal, fetal, neonatal and caregiver outcomes.We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register (30 November 2016) and reference lists of retrieved studies.Randomised, quasi-randomised or cluster-randomised controlled trials of any upright position assumed by pregnant women during the second stage of labour compared with supine or lithotomy positions. Secondary comparisons include comparison

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2017 Cochrane