Latest & greatest articles for anaesthesia

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on anaesthesia or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on anaesthesia and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Anaesthesia

Clinical Anaesthesia is used to induce a temporary medical state of controlled unconsciousness, inducing a loss of sensation or awareness. There are three main types of Anaesthesia:

  • Local and Regional
  • General
  • Sedation

Anaesthesia is primarily used during surgical procedures to block pain. While unconscious, blood flow and heart rate is monitored.

Research and development in the use of Anaesthesia has helped anesthesiologists in the progression of patient safety before and after surgery and medical procedures. The developments and research of Anaesthesia through the years has massively influences medicine and surgery today.

Case studies and clinical trials help aid researchers in the development of aftercare during postoperative recovery. Research is a vital part in the field of Anaesthesia, it allows anesthesiologists to improve the delivery of patient safety while unconscious.

Learn more on the emerging technology in Anaesthesia and the advancements in Anaesthesia practise by searching Trip.

Top results for anaesthesia

162. Nasal Fracture manipulation under local anaesthesia

Nasal Fracture manipulation under local anaesthesia BestBets: Should Nasal Fractures be manipulated under local anaesthesia? Should Nasal Fractures be manipulated under local anaesthesia? Report By: Oisin Powell - Spr Emergency Medicine Search checked by Deepak Doshi - Spr Emergency Medicine Institution: Cork University Hospital, Ireland. Date Submitted: 28th November 2007 Last Modified: 13th August 2008 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [adults with displaced nasal fractures (...) ] does [digital manipulation under local anaesthesia vs manipulation under GA] produce [cosmetic appearance and airway patency comparable to manipulation under general anaesthesia, at acceptable pain levels for the patient]. Clinical Scenario In [adults with displaced nasal fractures] does [ digital manipulation under local anaesthesia] produce [cosmetic appearance and airway patency comparable to manipulation under general anaesthesia, at acceptable pain levels for the patient Search Strategy

BestBETS2008

163. Epidural anaesthesia and survival after intermediate-to-high risk non-cardiac surgery: a population-based cohort study.

Epidural anaesthesia and survival after intermediate-to-high risk non-cardiac surgery: a population-based cohort study. BACKGROUND: Although epidural anaesthesia and analgesia have numerous benefits, their effects on postoperative survival are unclear. We therefore undertook a population-based cohort study to determine whether perioperative epidural anaesthesia or analgesia is associated with improved 30-day survival. METHODS: We used population-based linked administrative databases to do (...) a retrospective cohort study of 259 037 patients, aged 40 years or older, who underwent selected elective intermediate-to-high risk non-cardiac surgical procedures between April 1, 1994, and March 31, 2004, in Ontario, Canada. Propensity-score methods were used to construct a matched-pairs cohort that reduced important baseline differences between patients who received epidural anaesthesia or analgesia as opposed to those that did not. We then determined the association of epidural anaesthesia with 30-day

Lancet2008

164. Peribulbar versus retrobulbar anaesthesia for cataract surgery.

Peribulbar versus retrobulbar anaesthesia for cataract surgery. BACKGROUND: Cataract is a major cause of blindness worldwide. Unless medically contraindicated, cataract surgery is usually performed under local (regional) anaesthesia. Local anaesthesia involves the blockage of a nerve subserving a given part of the body by infiltration of the area around the nerve with local anaesthetic. The two main approaches in the eye are retrobulbar and peribulbar. There is debate over whether (...) the peribulbar approach provides more effective and safer anaesthesia for cataract surgery than retrobulbar block. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of peribulbar anaesthesia (PB) compared to retrobulbar anaesthesia (RB) on pain scores, ocular akinesia, patient acceptability and ocular and systemic complications. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 4); MEDLINE (1960 to December 2007

Cochrane2008

165. Lidocaine 70mg/tetracaine 70mg (Rapydan 70mg/70mg medicated plaster) - for surface anaesthesia of the skin in connection with needle puncture and in cases of superficial surgical procedures

Lidocaine 70mg/tetracaine 70mg (Rapydan 70mg/70mg medicated plaster) - for surface anaesthesia of the skin in connection with needle puncture and in cases of superficial surgical procedures Secretariat - Delta House 50 West Nile Street Glasgow G1 2NP Telephone 0141 225 6997 Fax 0141 248 3778 E-mail rosie.murray@nhs.net Chairman Dr Kenneth R Paterson Published 09 June 2008 Scottish Medicines Consortium lidocaine 70mg / tetracaine 70mg (Rapydan 70 mg / 70 mg medicated plaster) (No. 483/08) EUSA (...) Pharma (Europe) Limited Statement of Advice 09 May 2008 ADVICE: in the absence of a submission from the holder of the marketing authorisation. lidocaine 70mg / tetracaine 70mg (Rapydan 70mg / 70mg medicated plaster) is not recommended for use within NHSScotland for surface anaesthesia of the skin in connection with needle puncture and in cases of superficial surgical procedures (such as excision of various skin lesions and punch biopsies) on normal skin in adults; or for surface anaesthesia

Scottish Medicines Consortium2008

166. Intravenous versus inhalation anaesthesia for one-lung ventilation.

Intravenous versus inhalation anaesthesia for one-lung ventilation. BACKGROUND: The technique called one-lung ventilation can confine bleeding or infection to one lung, prevent rupture of a lung cyst or, more commonly, facilitate surgical exposure of the unventilated lung. During one-lung ventilation, anaesthesia is maintained either by delivering a volatile anaesthetic to the ventilated lung or by infusing an intravenous anaesthetic. It is possible that the method chosen to maintain (...) anaesthesia may affect patient outcomes. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of intravenous versus inhalation anaesthesia for one-lung ventilation. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2006, Issue 3), MEDLINE, LILACS, EMBASE (from inception to June 2006), ISI web of Science (1945 to June 2006), reference lists of identified trials, and bibliographies of published reviews. We also

Cochrane2008

167. Randomized clinical trial comparing day-care open haemorrhoidectomy under local versus general anaesthesia

Randomized clinical trial comparing day-care open haemorrhoidectomy under local versus general anaesthesia Randomized clinical trial comparing day-care open haemorrhoidectomy under local versus general anaesthesia Randomized clinical trial comparing day-care open haemorrhoidectomy under local versus general anaesthesia Kushwaha R, Hutchings W, Davies C, Rao N G Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract (...) contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary The study compared the costs and effects of two options for open haemorrhoidectomy, the use of either local or general anaesthesia, in patients with third-degree haemorrhoids. The authors concluded that both anaesthetic approaches had similar clinical outcomes in terms of pain and patient expectations, but that local

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2008

168. Randomized clinical trial comparing day-care open haemorrhoidectomy under local versus general anaesthesia

Randomized clinical trial comparing day-care open haemorrhoidectomy under local versus general anaesthesia 18389499 2008 04 14 2008 05 15 2014 07 30 1365-2168 95 5 2008 May The British journal of surgery Br J Surg Randomized clinical trial comparing day-care open haemorrhoidectomy under local versus general anaesthesia. 555-63 10.1002/bjs.6113 Day-care open haemorrhoidectomy under local anaesthesia (LH) may be the most cost-effective approach to haemorrhoidectomy. This prospective randomized (...) trial compared outcome after LH from patients' and clinical perspectives with that after day-care open haemorrhoidectomy under general anaesthesia (GH). Forty-one patients with third-degree haemorrhoids were randomized to LH (19) or GH (22). Patient demographics were comparable. A single haemorrhoid was excised in 15 patients, and two and three haemorrhoids in 13 each. Independent nurse-led assessment and clinical evaluation were carried out for 6 months. Outcome measures were mean and expected pain

EvidenceUpdates2008

169. General anaesthesia versus local anaesthesia for carotid surgery (GALA): a multicentre, randomised controlled trial.

General anaesthesia versus local anaesthesia for carotid surgery (GALA): a multicentre, randomised controlled trial. 19041130 2008 12 22 2009 01 06 2015 06 16 1474-547X 372 9656 2008 Dec 20 Lancet (London, England) Lancet General anaesthesia versus local anaesthesia for carotid surgery (GALA): a multicentre, randomised controlled trial. 2132-42 10.1016/S0140-6736(08)61699-2 The effect of carotid endarterectomy in lowering the risk of stroke ipsilateral to severe atherosclerotic carotid-artery (...) stenosis is offset by complications during or soon after surgery. We compared surgery under general anaesthesia with that under local anaesthesia because prediction and avoidance of perioperative strokes might be easier under local anaesthesia than under general anaesthesia. We undertook a parallel group, multicentre, randomised controlled trial of 3526 patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis from 95 centres in 24 countries. Participants were randomly assigned to surgery under

Lancet2008

174. Epidural analgesia/anaesthesia versus systemic intravenous opioid analgesia in the management of blunt thoracic trauma.

Epidural analgesia/anaesthesia versus systemic intravenous opioid analgesia in the management of blunt thoracic trauma. BestBets: Epidural analgesia/anaesthesia versus systemic intravenous opioid analgesia in the management of blunt thoracic trauma. Epidural analgesia/anaesthesia versus systemic intravenous opioid analgesia in the management of blunt thoracic trauma. Report By: Dr Richard Parris - Consultant in Emergency Medicine Search checked by Barbara Scobie - ST3 in Emergency Medicine (...) on the CXR. You wonder whether placement of an epidural catheter and infusion of opioid or local anaesthetic agents offers any benefit over intravenous opioid analgesics (by intermittent bolus or patient controlled analgesia) in relieving the patient's pain or reducing complications from his injury. Search Strategy MEDLINE: [rib fracture.exp OR thoracic injuries.exp] AND [injections,epidural exp OR analgesic epidural exp] EMBASE: [Thorax blunt trauma OR thorax injury OR rib fracture] AND [epidural

BestBETS2007

175. Sub-Tenon's anaesthesia versus topical anaesthesia for cataract surgery.

Sub-Tenon's anaesthesia versus topical anaesthesia for cataract surgery. BACKGROUND: Local anaesthesia for cataract surgery can be provided by either sub-Tenon or topical anaesthesia. Although there is some work suggesting advantages to both techniques, there has been no recent systematic attempt to compare both techniques for all relevant outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness of topical anaesthesia (with or without the addition of intracameral local anaesthetic) and sub-Tenon's (...) anaesthesia in providing pain relief during cataract surgery. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, 2006, Issue 2); MEDLINE (1990 to July 2006); EMBASE (1990 to July 2006) and reference lists of articles. There were no constraints based on language or publication status. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included all randomized or quasi-randomized studies comparing sub-Tenon anaesthesia with topical anaesthesia for cataract surgery. DATA COLLECTION

Cochrane2007

176. Remifentanil for general anaesthesia: a systematic review

Remifentanil for general anaesthesia: a systematic review Remifentanil for general anaesthesia: a systematic review Remifentanil for general anaesthesia: a systematic review Komatsu R, Turan A M, Orhan-Sungur M, McGuire J, Radke O C, Apfel C C CRD summary This generally well-conducted review compared remifentanil with fentanyl, alfentanil or sufentanil for analgesia during general anaesthesia. The authors concluded that remifentanil induced deeper analgesia and anaesthesia. Patients given (...) remifentanil showed faster recovery times but needed post-operative analgesia more frequently. The review included a large number of patients and, despite some concerns about the synthesis, the authors' conclusions are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To evaluate the intra-operative and post-operative efficacy and safety of remifentanil as an analgesic supplement during general anaesthesia compared with other currently used opioids. Searching MEDLINE, an ISI index and the Cochrane Library were

DARE.2007

178. Techniques for preventing hypotension during spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section.

Techniques for preventing hypotension during spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. BACKGROUND: Maternal hypotension, the most frequent complication of spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section, can be associated with severe nausea or vomiting which can pose serious risks to the mother (unconsciousness, pulmonary aspiration) and baby (hypoxia, acidosis and neurological injury). OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of prophylactic interventions for hypotension following spinal anaesthesia (...) for caesarean section. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (November 2005). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials comparing interventions to prevent hypotension with placebo or alternative treatment in women having spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three review authors independently assessed eligibility and methodological quality of studies, and extracted data. MAIN RESULTS: We included 75 trials (a total

Cochrane2006

180. Paravertebral blocks for anaesthesia and analgesia: a systematic review

Paravertebral blocks for anaesthesia and analgesia: a systematic review Paravertebral blocks for anaesthesia and analgesia: a systematic review Paravertebral blocks for anaesthesia and analgesia: a systematic review Thavaneswaran P, Maddern G, Cooter R, Moyes D, Rudkin G CRD summary This review assessed the efficacy and safety of thoracic and lumbar paraveterbral blocks (PVB) for anaesthesia and analgesia. The authors concluded that paraveterbral block was at least as safe and effective (...) as general anaesthesia and alternative analgesia techniques. This was a generally well-conducted review of heterogeneous studies. The conclusions are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of thoracic and lumbar paravertebral blocks (PVB) for surgical anaesthesia compared to: general anaesthesia or other regional anaesthetic techniques; and regional blocks or analgesic drugs for postoperative analgesia. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, Science

DARE.2006