Latest & greatest articles for anaesthesia

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on anaesthesia or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on anaesthesia and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Anaesthesia

Clinical Anaesthesia is used to induce a temporary medical state of controlled unconsciousness, inducing a loss of sensation or awareness. There are three main types of Anaesthesia:

  • Local and Regional
  • General
  • Sedation

Anaesthesia is primarily used during surgical procedures to block pain. While unconscious, blood flow and heart rate is monitored.

Research and development in the use of Anaesthesia has helped anesthesiologists in the progression of patient safety before and after surgery and medical procedures. The developments and research of Anaesthesia through the years has massively influences medicine and surgery today.

Case studies and clinical trials help aid researchers in the development of aftercare during postoperative recovery. Research is a vital part in the field of Anaesthesia, it allows anesthesiologists to improve the delivery of patient safety while unconscious.

Learn more on the emerging technology in Anaesthesia and the advancements in Anaesthesia practise by searching Trip.

Top results for anaesthesia

141. Paracervical local anaesthesia for cervical dilatation and uterine intervention.

Paracervical local anaesthesia for cervical dilatation and uterine intervention. BACKGROUND: Cervical dilatation and uterine intervention can be performed under sedation, local or general anaesthesia for obstetrics and gynaecological conditions. Many gynaecologists use paracervical local anaesthesia (PLA) but its effectiveness is unclear. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and safety of paracervical anaesthesia for cervical dilatation and uterine intervention when compared (...) with no treatment, placebo, other methods of regional anaesthesia, systemic sedation and analgesia, or general anaesthesia (GA). SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2006, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2006), EMBASE (1980 to January 2006) and reference lists of articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomized or controlled clinical studies involving cervical dilatation and uterine intervention for obstetric and gynaecological

Cochrane2009

150. Does regional anaesthesia improve outcome after total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review

Does regional anaesthesia improve outcome after total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review Does regional anaesthesia improve outcome after total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review Does regional anaesthesia improve outcome after total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review Macfarlane AJ, Prasad GA, Chan VW, Brull R CRD summary The authors concluded there was insufficient evidence on the effects of regional versus general anaesthesia for a range of outcomes in patients undergoing total hip (...) arthroplasty, but regional anaesthesia may reduce blood loss, post-operative pain, morphine consumption, nausea and vomiting. Given inadequate reporting of the review methods and poor study quality, it is difficult to be confident of these findings. Authors' objectives To compare general anaesthesia versus regional anaesthesia and systemic versus regional analgesia in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were

DARE.2009

151. Systematic review of spinal anaesthesia using bupivacaine for ambulatory knee arthroscopy

Systematic review of spinal anaesthesia using bupivacaine for ambulatory knee arthroscopy Systematic review of spinal anaesthesia using bupivacaine for ambulatory knee arthroscopy Systematic review of spinal anaesthesia using bupivacaine for ambulatory knee arthroscopy Nair GS, Abrishami A, Lermitte J, Chung F CRD summary The authors concluded that findings suggested that 4 to 5 mg of hyperbaric bupivacaine could produce effective spinal anaesthesia for outpatient knee arthroscopy (...) with unilateral positioning. The specific doses mentioned in the conclusion appeared to be based on limited evidence, so the authors’ conclusion should be interpreted with caution. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effects of bupivacaine for spinal anaesthesia in ambulatory knee arthroscopy. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and DARE were searched over periods ranging from 1950 to December 2007. Search terms were reported. No language restrictions

DARE.2009

152. Risks and side-effects of intrathecal morphine combined with spinal anaesthesia: a meta-analysis

Risks and side-effects of intrathecal morphine combined with spinal anaesthesia: a meta-analysis Risks and side-effects of intrathecal morphine combined with spinal anaesthesia: a meta-analysis Risks and side-effects of intrathecal morphine combined with spinal anaesthesia: a meta-analysis Gehling M, Tryba M CRD summary This review found the use of intrathecal morphine in combination with spinal anaesthesia for post-operative analgesia was associated with an increase in nausea, vomiting (...) and pruritus. The authors' conclusions reflected the evidence presented but some methodological weaknesses mean that the reliability of these conclusions is unclear. Authors' objectives To assess the frequency of side-effects in patients receiving intrathecal morphine in combination with spinal anaesthesia. Searching MEDLINE was searched from inception to 2007; search terms were reported. Reference lists of retrieved articles were also searched for additional studies. It was unclear if any language

DARE.2009

160. Randomized clinical trial of stapled haemorrhoidopexy performed under local perianal block versus general anaesthesia

Randomized clinical trial of stapled haemorrhoidopexy performed under local perianal block versus general anaesthesia 18844245 2008 10 23 2008 11 28 2014 07 30 1365-2168 95 11 2008 Nov The British journal of surgery Br J Surg Randomized clinical trial of stapled haemorrhoidopexy performed under local perianal block versus general anaesthesia. 1344-51 10.1002/bjs.6379 The aim was to assess the feasibility of performing stapled haemorrhoidopexy under local anaesthesia. Fifty-eight patients (...) with haemorrhoid prolapse were randomized to receive local or general anaesthesia. The perianal block was applied immediately peripheral to the external sphincter. Submucosal block was added after applying the purse-string suture. Patients reported average and peak pain daily for 14 days using a visual analogue scale (VAS). They also completed anal symptom questionnaires before the operation and at follow-up. The surgeon assessed the restoration of the anal anatomy 3-6 months after surgery. The anal block

EvidenceUpdates2008