Latest & greatest articles for anaesthesia

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Anaesthesia

Clinical Anaesthesia is used to induce a temporary medical state of controlled unconsciousness, inducing a loss of sensation or awareness. There are three main types of Anaesthesia:

  • Local and Regional
  • General
  • Sedation

Anaesthesia is primarily used during surgical procedures to block pain. While unconscious, blood flow and heart rate is monitored.

Research and development in the use of Anaesthesia has helped anesthesiologists in the progression of patient safety before and after surgery and medical procedures. The developments and research of Anaesthesia through the years has massively influences medicine and surgery today.

Case studies and clinical trials help aid researchers in the development of aftercare during postoperative recovery. Research is a vital part in the field of Anaesthesia, it allows anesthesiologists to improve the delivery of patient safety while unconscious.

Learn more on the emerging technology in Anaesthesia and the advancements in Anaesthesia practise by searching Trip.

Top results for anaesthesia

141. Recommendations on monitoring during anaesthesia

Recommendations on monitoring during anaesthesia PS18 2013 Page 1 PS08 2013 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Recommendations on Monitoring During Anaesthesia The terms “anaesthetist”, “medical practitioner” and “practitioner” are used interchangeably in this document. Although this document is primarily aimed at anaesthetists, any practitioner responsible for patient monitoring during “anaesthesia” should follow these recommendations. The following recommendations (...) refer to patients undergoing general anaesthesia, major regional anaesthesia/analgesia or sedation (to be collectively described by the term “anaesthesia”) for diagnostic or therapeutic procedures and should be interpreted in conjunction with other professional documents published by the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Monitoring of fundamental physiological variables during anaesthesia is essential. Clinical judgment will determine how long this monitoring

2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

142. Sedation versus general anaesthesia for provision of dental treatment in under 18 year olds. (PubMed)

Sedation versus general anaesthesia for provision of dental treatment in under 18 year olds. A significant proportion of children have caries requiring restorations or extractions, and some of these children will not accept this treatment under local anaesthetic. Historically this has been managed in children by the use of a general anaesthetic, however use of sedation may lead to reduced morbidity and cost. The aim of this review is to compare the efficiency of sedation versus general (...) anaesthesia for the provision of dental treatment for children and adolescents aged under 18 years.This review was originally published in 2009 and updated in 2012.We evaluated the intra- and postoperative morbidity, effectiveness and cost effectiveness of sedation versus general anaesthesia for the provision of dental treatment for under 18 year olds.In this updated review we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 7); MEDLINE (Ovid) (1950

2012 Cochrane

143. The role of regional anaesthesia techniques in the management of acute pain

The role of regional anaesthesia techniques in the management of acute pain The role of regional anaesthesia techniques in the management of acute pain The role of regional anaesthesia techniques in the management of acute pain Cowlishaw PJ, Scott DM, Barrington MJ CRD summary The review concluded that regional anaesthesia/analgesia was superior to conventional therapy for management of postoperative pain following a range of surgical types. Variation in characteristics of the included studies (...) and potential for bias in the review process mean that the authors' conclusions should be considered tentative. Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy of regional anaesthesia and analgesia for the management of acute pain following surgery. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched for relevant studies published between March 2009 and March 2011. There were no language restrictions. Search terms were reported. Study selection Randomised

2012 DARE.

144. Local anaesthesia for ophthalmic surgery

Local anaesthesia for ophthalmic surgery Local anaesthesia for ophthalmic surgery February 2012 Joint guidelines from the Royal College of Anaesthetists and the Royal College of Ophthalmologists1 Royal College of Anaesthetists and Royal College of Ophthalmologists Summary There have been major advances in every aspect of the management of the ophthalmic surgical patient. These include the shift to day care, increased focus on the patient, and the involvement of the entire ophthalmic team in all (...) components of the process. A working party of the Royal College of Anaesthetists and the Royal College of Ophthalmologists was convened to update the 2001 ‘Guidelines on Local Anaesthesia for Intraocular Surgery’. The working party agreed unanimously to change this to ‘Guidelines on Local Anaesthesia for Ophthalmic Surgery’. These guidelines will now cover the management of patients undergoing most routine ophthalmic procedures and are not limited to intraocular surgery. The purpose of these guidelines

2012 Royal College of Anaesthetists

145. Anaesthesia for evacuation of incomplete miscarriage. (PubMed)

Anaesthesia for evacuation of incomplete miscarriage. An incomplete miscarriage occurs when all the products of conception are not expelled through the cervix. Curettage or vacuum aspiration have been used to remove retained tissues. The anaesthetic techniques used to facilitate this procedure have not been systematically evaluated in order to determine which provide better outcomes to the patients.To assess the effects of general anaesthesia, sedation or analgesia, regional or paracervical (...) -RCTs comparing the use of any anaesthetic technique (defined by authors as general anaesthesia, sedation/analgesia, regional or paracervical local block (PCB) procedures) to perform surgical evacuation of an incomplete miscarriage. We excluded quasi-randomised trials and studies that were only available as abstracts.Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion and assessed risk of bias. Data were independently extracted and checked for accuracy.We included seven trials involving

2012 Cochrane

146. Recommendations on Minimum Facilities for Safe Administration of Anaesthesia in Operating Suites and Other Anaesthetising Locations

Recommendations on Minimum Facilities for Safe Administration of Anaesthesia in Operating Suites and Other Anaesthetising Locations PS55 2012 Page 1 PS55 2012 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Recommendations on Minimum Facilities for Safe Administration of Anaesthesia in Operating Suites and Other Anaesthetising Locations 1. PRINCIPLES OF ANAESTHESIA CARE 1.1 The provision of safe anaesthesia in hospitals requires appropriate staff, facilities and equipment (...) . These are specified in this document. 1.2 Anaesthesia should be administered only by medical practitioners with appropriate training in anaesthesia or by trainees supervised according to College professional documents TE03 Policy on Supervision of Clinical Experience for Vocational Trainees in Anaesthesia, PS01 Recommendations on Essential Training for Rural General Practitioners in Australia Proposing to Administer Anaesthesia and PS02 Statement on Credentialling and Defining the Scope of Clinical Practice

2012 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

147. Guidelines on Equipment to Manage a Difficult Airway During Anaesthesia

Guidelines on Equipment to Manage a Difficult Airway During Anaesthesia PS56 2012 Page 1 PS56 2012 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Guidelines on Equipment to Manage a Difficult Airway During Anaesthesia 1. PURPOSE AND SCOPE Airway complications are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in anaesthesia. Effective management of a difficult airway is a core skill for anaesthetists, and depends on the timely availability of suitable airway equipment. This document (...) provides recommendations for the equipment needed to manage a difficult airway, the location in which it should be kept, and the quality assurance measures required to ensure that it is always available and in good working order 2. BASIC REQUIREMENTS FOR MANAGING THE AIRWAY WHEN PROVIDING ANAESTHESIA 2.1 Anaesthesia should be administered only by medical practitioners with appropriate training in anaesthesia, or by supervised trainees, in accordance with the College professional documents listed

2012 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

148. Guidelines on Equipment to Manage a Difficult Airway During Anaesthesia Background Paper

Guidelines on Equipment to Manage a Difficult Airway During Anaesthesia Background Paper PS56 BP 2012 Page 1 PS56 BP 2012 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Guidelines on Equipment to Manage a Difficult Airway During Anaesthesia Background Paper INTRODUCTION Airway complications are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in anaesthesia. 1 Effective management of a difficult airway is a core skill for anaesthetists, and depends on the timely availability of suitable (...) with the emergency”. 2 In the Australian Incident Monitoring Study (AIMS), equipment deficiencies, which were mainly due to “failure to check”, contributed to five of the 14 factors that were identified in the 85 difficult intubation reports. 4 The 1000 anaesthesia incidents reported to this study from 2002-2006 showed an appreciable increase in difficult and failed intubations compared with the first 2000 reports. 5 A review from the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) closed claims database comparing

2012 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

149. Guidelines on Quality Assurance in Anaesthesia

Guidelines on Quality Assurance in Anaesthesia PS58 2018 Page 1 PS58 2018 Guidelines on Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement in Anaesthesia 1. PURPOSE The aim of these guidelines is to assist practitioners in achieving the highest quality of care for their patients through an understanding of Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Improvement (QI). 2. INTRODUCTION 2.1. It is incumbent upon Fellows at an individual, departmental and institutional level to contribute to the collective assurance (...) clinicians. Compliance with the College’s CPD standard is mandated by the Medical Board of Australia for all registered specialist anaesthetists and specialist pain medicine physicians practising in Australia, and participation in the program is mandated by the Medical Council of New Zealand for vocationally registered anaesthetists and pain medicine physicians practising in New Zealand. 2.7. Research underpins the scientific advances that progress anaesthesia, pain management and the perioperative care

2012 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

150. Recommendations on Minimum Facilities for Safe Administration of Anaesthesia in Operating Suites and Other Anaesthetising Locations

Recommendations on Minimum Facilities for Safe Administration of Anaesthesia in Operating Suites and Other Anaesthetising Locations PS55 2012 Page 1 PS55 2012 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Recommendations on Minimum Facilities for Safe Administration of Anaesthesia in Operating Suites and Other Anaesthetising Locations 1. PRINCIPLES OF ANAESTHESIA CARE 1.1 The provision of safe anaesthesia in hospitals requires appropriate staff, facilities and equipment (...) . These are specified in this document. 1.2 Anaesthesia should be administered only by medical practitioners with appropriate training in anaesthesia or by trainees supervised according to College professional documents TE03 Policy on Supervision of Clinical Experience for Vocational Trainees in Anaesthesia, PS01 Recommendations on Essential Training for Rural General Practitioners in Australia Proposing to Administer Anaesthesia and PS02 Statement on Credentialling and Defining the Scope of Clinical Practice

2012 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

151. Guidelines on Equipment to Manage a Difficult Airway During Anaesthesia

Guidelines on Equipment to Manage a Difficult Airway During Anaesthesia PS56 2012 Page 1 PS56 2012 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Guidelines on Equipment to Manage a Difficult Airway During Anaesthesia 1. PURPOSE AND SCOPE Airway complications are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in anaesthesia. Effective management of a difficult airway is a core skill for anaesthetists, and depends on the timely availability of suitable airway equipment. This document (...) provides recommendations for the equipment needed to manage a difficult airway, the location in which it should be kept, and the quality assurance measures required to ensure that it is always available and in good working order 2. BASIC REQUIREMENTS FOR MANAGING THE AIRWAY WHEN PROVIDING ANAESTHESIA 2.1 Anaesthesia should be administered only by medical practitioners with appropriate training in anaesthesia, or by supervised trainees, in accordance with the College professional documents listed

2012 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

152. Local Anaesthesia in Ophthalmic Surgery

Local Anaesthesia in Ophthalmic Surgery Local anaesthesia for ophthalmic surgery February 2012 Joint guidelines from the Royal College of Anaesthetists and the Royal College of Ophthalmologists1 Royal College of Anaesthetists and Royal College of Ophthalmologists Summary There have been major advances in every aspect of the management of the ophthalmic surgical patient. These include the shift to day care, increased focus on the patient, and the involvement of the entire ophthalmic team in all (...) components of the process. A working party of the Royal College of Anaesthetists and the Royal College of Ophthalmologists was convened to update the 2001 ‘Guidelines on Local Anaesthesia for Intraocular Surgery’. The working party agreed unanimously to change this to ‘Guidelines on Local Anaesthesia for Ophthalmic Surgery’. These guidelines will now cover the management of patients undergoing most routine ophthalmic procedures and are not limited to intraocular surgery. The purpose of these guidelines

2012 Royal College of Ophthalmologists

153. Ultrasound in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care - A Guide to Training

Ultrasound in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care - A Guide to Training Ultrasound in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care: A Guide to Training Published by The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain & Ireland The Royal College of Anaesthetists The Intensive Care Society July 2011 care when it matters intensive care society ultrasound cover CMYK.indd 3 13/07/2011 08:591 Membership of the working party (Details correct at the start of the working party process) Dr N M Denny AAGBI (Chair) Dr K Fox (...) British Society of Echocardiography Dr C Gillbe AAGBI Dr A W Harrop-Griffiths AAGBI Dr M Jones Society for Acute Medicine Dr N Love Group of Anaesthetists in Training Dr P MacNaughton Intensive Care Society Dr R McWilliams Royal College of Radiologists Dr B Nicholls Regional Anaesthesia (UK) Dr P Nightingale Royal College of Anaesthetists Dr J Pilcher British Medical Ultrasound Society Dr S Price Intensive Care Society and British Society of Echocardiography Mr J Sloan College of Emergency Medicine Dr

2012 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

154. Propofol for procedural sedation/anaesthesia in neonates. (PubMed)

Propofol for procedural sedation/anaesthesia in neonates. Elective medical or surgical procedures are commonplace for neonates admitted to NICU. Agents such as opioids are commonly used for achieving sedation/analgesia/anaesthesia for such procedures; however, these agents are associated with adverse effects. Propofol is used widely in paediatric and adult populations for this purpose. The efficacy and safety of the use of propofol in neonates has not been defined.To determine the efficacy (...) and safety of propofol treatment compared to placebo or no treatment or alternate active agents in neonates undergoing sedation or anaesthesia for procedures. To conduct subgroup analyses according to method of propofol administration (bolus or continuous infusion), type of active control agent (neuromuscular blocking agents with or without the use of sedative, analgesics or anxiolytics), type of procedure (endotracheal intubation, eye examination, other procedure), and gestational age (preterm and term

2011 Cochrane

155. Guidelines for the management of children referred for dental extractions under general anaesthesia

Guidelines for the management of children referred for dental extractions under general anaesthesia Guidelines For The Management Of Children Referred For Dental Extractions Under General Anaesthesia August 2011 Review Date: 2016 The Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists of Great Britain & Ireland The Royal College of Anaesthetists 1 | Main Authors: Dr Lola Adewale, Dr Neil Morton, Dr Michael Blayney Date Published: August 2011 Review date 2016 These guidelines are published in good faith (...) comments to: Chair, Guideline Committee Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland 21 Portland Place, London W1B 1PY apagbiadministration@aagbi.org 2 | Guidelines For The Management Of Children Referred For Dental Extractions Under General Anaesthesia 3 | TABLE OF CONTENTS Ex ecutive Summary 1. Introduction 5 2. Committee 6 3. Methodology And E vidence Grading 7 3.1 Levels of evidence (www.sign.ac.uk) 7 3.2 Grades of recommenda tions (www.sign.ac.uk) 8 4. Definition Of A Guid

2011 Royal College of Anaesthetists

156. Efficacy of low-dose bupivacaine in spinal anaesthesia for caesarean delivery: systematic review and meta-analysis

Efficacy of low-dose bupivacaine in spinal anaesthesia for caesarean delivery: systematic review and meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2011 DARE.

157. Multimodal system designed to reduce errors in recording and administration of drugs in anaesthesia: prospective randomised clinical evaluation. (PubMed)

Multimodal system designed to reduce errors in recording and administration of drugs in anaesthesia: prospective randomised clinical evaluation. To clinically evaluate a new patented multimodal system (SAFERSleep) designed to reduce errors in the recording and administration of drugs in anaesthesia.Prospective randomised open label clinical trial.Five designated operating theatres in a major tertiary referral hospital.Eighty nine consenting anaesthetists managing 1075 cases in which there were (...) of an anaesthetic record; an on-screen and audible warning if an antibiotic has not been administered within 15 minutes of the start of anaesthesia; and certain procedural rules-notably, scanning the label before each drug administration) versus conventional practice in drug administration with a manually compiled anaesthetic record.Primary: composite of errors in the recording and administration of intravenous drugs detected by direct observation and by detailed reconciliation of the contents of used drug

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2011 BMJ Controlled trial quality: uncertain

158. Cost-effectiveness analysis of general anaesthesia versus local anaesthesia for carotid surgery (GALA Trial) (PubMed)

Cost-effectiveness analysis of general anaesthesia versus local anaesthesia for carotid surgery (GALA Trial) Health outcomes and costs are both important when deciding whether general (GA) or local (LA) anaesthesia should be used during carotid endarterectomy. The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of carotid endarterectomy under LA or GA in patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis for whom surgery was advised.Using patient-level data from a large

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2010 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

159. Risk assessment for respiratory complications in paediatric anaesthesia: a prospective cohort study. (PubMed)

Risk assessment for respiratory complications in paediatric anaesthesia: a prospective cohort study. Perioperative respiratory adverse events in children are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality during paediatric anaesthesia. We aimed to identify associations between family history, anaesthesia management, and occurrence of perioperative respiratory adverse events.We prospectively included all children who had general anaesthesia for surgical or medical interventions, elective (...) or urgent procedures at Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, Australia, from Feb 1, 2007, to Jan 31, 2008. On the day of surgery, anaesthetists in charge of paediatric patients completed an adapted version of the International Study Group for Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire. We collected data on family medical history of asthma, atopy, allergy, upper respiratory tract infection, and passive smoking. Anaesthesia management and all perioperative respiratory adverse events were

2010 Lancet

160. The Anaesthesia Team 3

The Anaesthesia Team 3 3 The Anaesthesia Team Published by The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland 21 Portland Place, London, W1B 1PY Telephone 020 7631 1650 Fax 020 7631 4352 info@aagbi.org www.aagbi.org May 2010 1 Membership of the working party (details correct at the start of the working party process) Dr R J S Birks Chairman and AAGBI President Dr V R Alladi Council Member, AAGBI Ms J Angell PA(A) Representative, RCoA Dr R Broomhead GAT representative Prof W (...) . Introduction 4 3. Organisation and management 5 4. Pre-operative assessment 7 5. The operating department 8 6. Recovery post-anaesthetic care unit (PACU) 14 7. Postoperative pain management 16 References 18 To be reviewed by 2015. © Copyright of the Association of Great Britain & Ireland. No part of this book may be reproduced without the written permission of the AAGBI. 3 1. Recommendations Comprehensive peri-operative care can only be provided by an anaesthesia team led by consultant anaesthetists. All

2010 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland