Latest & greatest articles for anaesthesia

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on anaesthesia and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Anaesthesia

Clinical Anaesthesia is used to induce a temporary medical state of controlled unconsciousness, inducing a loss of sensation or awareness. There are three main types of Anaesthesia:

  • Local and Regional
  • General
  • Sedation

Anaesthesia is primarily used during surgical procedures to block pain. While unconscious, blood flow and heart rate is monitored.

Research and development in the use of Anaesthesia has helped anesthesiologists in the progression of patient safety before and after surgery and medical procedures. The developments and research of Anaesthesia through the years has massively influences medicine and surgery today.

Case studies and clinical trials help aid researchers in the development of aftercare during postoperative recovery. Research is a vital part in the field of Anaesthesia, it allows anesthesiologists to improve the delivery of patient safety while unconscious.

Learn more on the emerging technology in Anaesthesia and the advancements in Anaesthesia practise by searching Trip.

Top results for anaesthesia

102. Sedation versus general anaesthesia for provision of dental treatment in under 18 year olds.

Sedation versus general anaesthesia for provision of dental treatment in under 18 year olds. BACKGROUND: A significant proportion of children have caries requiring restorations or extractions, and some of these children will not accept this treatment under local anaesthetic. Historically this has been managed in children by the use of a general anaesthetic, however use of sedation may lead to reduced morbidity and cost. The aim of this review is to compare the efficiency of sedation versus (...) general anaesthesia for the provision of dental treatment for children and adolescents aged under 18 years.This review was originally published in 2009 and updated in 2012. OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the intra- and postoperative morbidity, effectiveness and cost effectiveness of sedation versus general anaesthesia for the provision of dental treatment for under 18 year olds. SEARCH METHODS: In this updated review we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane

Cochrane2012

103. The role of regional anaesthesia techniques in the management of acute pain

The role of regional anaesthesia techniques in the management of acute pain The role of regional anaesthesia techniques in the management of acute pain The role of regional anaesthesia techniques in the management of acute pain Cowlishaw PJ, Scott DM, Barrington MJ CRD summary The review concluded that regional anaesthesia/analgesia was superior to conventional therapy for management of postoperative pain following a range of surgical types. Variation in characteristics of the included studies (...) and potential for bias in the review process mean that the authors' conclusions should be considered tentative. Authors' objectives To assess the efficacy of regional anaesthesia and analgesia for the management of acute pain following surgery. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched for relevant studies published between March 2009 and March 2011. There were no language restrictions. Search terms were reported. Study selection Randomised

DARE.2012

105. Anaesthesia for evacuation of incomplete miscarriage.

Anaesthesia for evacuation of incomplete miscarriage. BACKGROUND: An incomplete miscarriage occurs when all the products of conception are not expelled through the cervix. Curettage or vacuum aspiration have been used to remove retained tissues. The anaesthetic techniques used to facilitate this procedure have not been systematically evaluated in order to determine which provide better outcomes to the patients. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of general anaesthesia, sedation or analgesia (...) , regional or paracervical block anaesthetic techniques, or differing regimens of these, for surgical evacuation of incomplete miscarriage. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (23 January 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 1), PubMed (1966 to 23 January 2012), EMBASE (1974 to 23 January 2012), CINAHL (1982 to 23 January 2012), LILACS (1982 to 23 January 2012) and reference lists of retrieved studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: All published

Cochrane2012

115. Propofol for procedural sedation/anaesthesia in neonates.

Propofol for procedural sedation/anaesthesia in neonates. BACKGROUND: Elective medical or surgical procedures are commonplace for neonates admitted to NICU. Agents such as opioids are commonly used for achieving sedation/analgesia/anaesthesia for such procedures; however, these agents are associated with adverse effects. Propofol is used widely in paediatric and adult populations for this purpose. The efficacy and safety of the use of propofol in neonates has not been defined. OBJECTIVES (...) : To determine the efficacy and safety of propofol treatment compared to placebo or no treatment or alternate active agents in neonates undergoing sedation or anaesthesia for procedures. To conduct subgroup analyses according to method of propofol administration (bolus or continuous infusion), type of active control agent (neuromuscular blocking agents with or without the use of sedative, analgesics or anxiolytics), type of procedure (endotracheal intubation, eye examination, other procedure

Cochrane2011

119. Efficacy of low-dose bupivacaine in spinal anaesthesia for caesarean delivery: systematic review and meta-analysis

Efficacy of low-dose bupivacaine in spinal anaesthesia for caesarean delivery: systematic review and meta-analysis Efficacy of low-dose bupivacaine in spinal anaesthesia for caesarean delivery: systematic review and meta-analysis Efficacy of low-dose bupivacaine in spinal anaesthesia for caesarean delivery: systematic review and meta-analysis Arzola C, Wieczorek PM CRD summary The review concluded that low dose bupivacaine for Caesarean delivery spinal anaesthesia compromised anaesthetic (...) neuraxial spinal anaesthesia were eligible for inclusion. Trials were limited to American Society of Anaesthesiologist I-II term parturients. Primary outcomes were frequency of intraoperative analgesic supplementation by any route and conversion to general anaesthesia. Secondary outcomes were maternal adverse effects, neonatal outcomes, patient satisfaction during the intraoperative period and surgical conditions as assessed by the surgeon. The included trials studied low dose spinal bupivacaine (4mg

DARE.2011

120. Multimodal system designed to reduce errors in recording and administration of drugs in anaesthesia: prospective randomised clinical evaluation.

Multimodal system designed to reduce errors in recording and administration of drugs in anaesthesia: prospective randomised clinical evaluation. 21940742 2011 09 23 2011 12 07 2017 02 20 1756-1833 343 2011 Sep 22 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Multimodal system designed to reduce errors in recording and administration of drugs in anaesthesia: prospective randomised clinical evaluation. d5543 10.1136/bmj.d5543 bmj.d5543 To clinically evaluate a new patented multimodal system (SAFERSleep (...) ) designed to reduce errors in the recording and administration of drugs in anaesthesia. Prospective randomised open label clinical trial. Five designated operating theatres in a major tertiary referral hospital. Eighty nine consenting anaesthetists managing 1075 cases in which there were 10,764 drug administrations. Use of the new system (which includes customised drug trays and purpose designed drug trolley drawers to promote a well organised anaesthetic workspace and aseptic technique; pre-filled

BMJ2011 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro