Latest & greatest articles for anaesthesia

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Anaesthesia

Clinical Anaesthesia is used to induce a temporary medical state of controlled unconsciousness, inducing a loss of sensation or awareness. There are three main types of Anaesthesia:

  • Local and Regional
  • General
  • Sedation

Anaesthesia is primarily used during surgical procedures to block pain. While unconscious, blood flow and heart rate is monitored.

Research and development in the use of Anaesthesia has helped anesthesiologists in the progression of patient safety before and after surgery and medical procedures. The developments and research of Anaesthesia through the years has massively influences medicine and surgery today.

Case studies and clinical trials help aid researchers in the development of aftercare during postoperative recovery. Research is a vital part in the field of Anaesthesia, it allows anesthesiologists to improve the delivery of patient safety while unconscious.

Learn more on the emerging technology in Anaesthesia and the advancements in Anaesthesia practise by searching Trip.

Top results for anaesthesia

101. Statement on Roles in Anaesthesia and Perioperative Care

Statement on Roles in Anaesthesia and Perioperative Care PS59 2015 Page 1 PS59 2015 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Statement on Roles in Anaesthesia and Perioperative Care 1. PURPOSE This statement provides a framework for discussions on the roles and responsibilities of health professionals in the anaesthesia and perioperative * care teams. The following five principles underpin this position statement: 1.1. The structure of anaesthesia and perioperative care must (...) support safe, high quality care. 1.2. The provision of anaesthesia is a medical role. 1.3. Innovation should be based on delegation, not substitution, of roles. 1.4. Anaesthesia and perioperative care require a team of highly skilled health professionals. 1.5. New or extended roles within the anaesthesia and perioperative care team should be developed, implemented and evaluated in a systematic and consistent way. 2. BACKGROUND The healthcare system faces significant challenges, including older, sicker

2015 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

102. Statement on Roles in Anaesthesia and Perioperative Care

Statement on Roles in Anaesthesia and Perioperative Care PS59 2015 Page 1 PS59 2015 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Statement on Roles in Anaesthesia and Perioperative Care 1. PURPOSE This statement provides a framework for discussions on the roles and responsibilities of health professionals in the anaesthesia and perioperative * care teams. The following five principles underpin this position statement: 1.1. The structure of anaesthesia and perioperative care must (...) support safe, high quality care. 1.2. The provision of anaesthesia is a medical role. 1.3. Innovation should be based on delegation, not substitution, of roles. 1.4. Anaesthesia and perioperative care require a team of highly skilled health professionals. 1.5. New or extended roles within the anaesthesia and perioperative care team should be developed, implemented and evaluated in a systematic and consistent way. 2. BACKGROUND The healthcare system faces significant challenges, including older, sicker

2015 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

103. Guidelines on Infection Control in Anaesthesia

Guidelines on Infection Control in Anaesthesia PS28 2015 Page 1 PS28 2015 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Guidelines on Infection Control in Anaesthesia 1. PURPOSE The Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) aims to ensure that the practice of anaesthesia is as safe as possible for patients, anaesthetists and other healthcare workers. Infection control aimed at minimising risks of infection is central to this aim. The goal of these guidelines (...) is to assist practitioners and facilities to implement strategies that will reduce risks of transmission of infection, based on current evidence. In certain clinical situations there may be a need to adopt more stringent practices. These guidelines should be considered with documents on this subject issued by other authorities, and in particular local infection control policies. 2. SCOPE OF THIS DOCUMENT This document is intended to apply in all areas where anaesthesia, including regional analgesia

2015 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

104. The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy and the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Joint Committee Practice Advisory on Controversial Topics in Pediatric Regional Anesthesia

The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy and the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Joint Committee Practice Advisory on Controversial Topics in Pediatric Regional Anesthesia The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therap... : Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Login No user account? Lippincott Journals Subscribers (...) your personal information without your express consent. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. Toggle navigation Articles & Issues Collections For Authors Journal Info > > The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therap... Email to a Colleague Colleague's E-mail is Invalid Your Name: (optional) Your Email: Colleague's Email: Separate multiple e-mails with a (;). Message: Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine. Send

2015 American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

105. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) for gastrointestinal surgery, part 2: consensus statement for anaesthesia practice

Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) for gastrointestinal surgery, part 2: consensus statement for anaesthesia practice Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) for gastrointestinal surgery, part 2: consensus statement for anaesthesia practice - Feldheiser - 2016 - Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica - Wiley Online Library By continuing to browse this site, you agree to its use of cookies as described in our . Search within Search term Search term Review Article Open Access Enhanced Recovery (...) After Surgery (ERAS) for gastrointestinal surgery, part 2: consensus statement for anaesthesia practice Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine Campus Charité, Mitte and Campus Virchow‐Klinikum Charité, University Medicine, Berlin, Germany St. Mark's Hospital, Harrow, Middlesex, UK Department of Anesthesia, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Therapy, University Hospital Maastricht (azM

2015 ERAS Society

106. Intraoperative local anaesthesia for reduction of postoperative pain following general anaesthesia for dental treatment in children and adolescents. (PubMed)

Intraoperative local anaesthesia for reduction of postoperative pain following general anaesthesia for dental treatment in children and adolescents. Whilst carrying out dental procedures under general anaesthesia (GA), practitioners routinely give local anaesthetics (LA) intraoperatively to children. Local anaesthetics are used to help manage postoperative pain and reduce bleeding and the physiological response to procedures. Studies of effectiveness of intraoperative LA to date have reported (...) contradictory results.To assess the effects of intraoperative local anaesthesia for reducing postoperative pain following general anaesthesia for dental treatment in children and young people aged 17 years or younger.We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2013, Issue 12), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 02 January 2014), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 02 January 2014) and Web

2014 Cochrane

107. Out of Hours Activity (Anaesthesia)

Out of Hours Activity (Anaesthesia) Out of Hours Activity (Anaesthesia) Guiding Principles and Recommendations JOINT POSITION STATEMENT Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland and Royal College of Anaesthetists October 2014 1Definitions The times that can be considered to be “out of hours” (OOH) may be defined contractually or by reference to published national standards. In the current Consultant Contracts for England and Wales, OOH is defined by the concept of “premium time (...) to be in-hospital providing resident shifts during part of the OOH period. The AAGBI and RCOA support measures to improve patient safety and quality of care but note that this will have a significant impact on Anaesthesia workforce. It has been suggested that with increased support services, it would be safe to perform elective operating lists at the weekend, and the principle of elective work OOH in the form of ‘Waiting List Initiatives’ is well established. Standards and operating procedures developed to make

2014 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

108. Tetracaine idocaine (Pliaglis) - local dermal anaesthesia

Tetracaine idocaine (Pliaglis) - local dermal anaesthesia Published 13 October 2014 Statement of Advice: tetracaine / lidocaine (Pliaglis 70 mg/g + 70 mg/g cream ® ) (No: 1000/14) Galderma (UK) Ltd 08 August 2014 ADVICE: in the absence of a submission from the holder of the marketing authorisation tetracaine / lidocaine (Pliaglis ® ) is not recommended for use within NHS Scotland. Indication under review: local dermal anaesthesia on intact skin prior to dermatological procedures in adults

2014 Scottish Medicines Consortium

109. Physician anaesthetists versus non-physician providers of anaesthesia for surgical patients. (PubMed)

Physician anaesthetists versus non-physician providers of anaesthesia for surgical patients. With increasing demand for surgery, pressure on healthcare providers to reduce costs, and a predicted shortfall in the number of medically qualified anaesthetists it is important to consider whether non-physician anaesthetists (NPAs), who do not have a medical qualification, are able to provide equivalent anaesthetic services to medically qualified anaesthesia providers.To assess the safety (...) and effectiveness of different anaesthetic providers for patients undergoing surgical procedures under general, regional or epidural anaesthesia. We planned to consider results from studies across countries worldwide (including developed and developing countries).We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL on 13 February 2014. Our search terms were relevant to the review question and not limited by study design or outcomes. We also carried out searches

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2014 Cochrane

110. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) during anaesthesia for prevention of mortality and postoperative pulmonary complications. (PubMed)

Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) during anaesthesia for prevention of mortality and postoperative pulmonary complications. General anaesthesia causes atelectasis, which can lead to impaired respiratory function. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is a mechanical manoeuvre that increases functional residual capacity (FRC) and prevents collapse of the airways, thereby reducing atelectasis. It is not known whether intraoperative PEEP alters the risks of postoperative mortality (...) Web of Science (1945 to October 2013) and LILACS (via BIREME interface) (1982 to October 2010). The original search was performed in January 2010.We included randomized clinical trials assessing the effects of PEEP versus no PEEP during general anaesthesia on postoperative mortality and postoperative respiratory complications in adults, 16 years of age and older.Two review authors independently selected papers, assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors to ask

2014 Cochrane

111. The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures

The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures Burnett H, Lambley R, West S, Ungar WJ, Mireskandari K Record Status This is a bibliographic (...) record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Burnett H, Lambley R, West S, Ungar WJ, Mireskandari K. The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures. Toronto: Technology Assessment at SickKids (TASK). 2014 Authors' objectives The primary objective was to determine the incremental cost of paediatric eye examinations

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

112. Intravenous versus inhalational anaesthesia for paediatric outpatient surgery. (PubMed)

Intravenous versus inhalational anaesthesia for paediatric outpatient surgery. Ambulatory or outpatient anaesthesia is performed in patients who are discharged on the same day as their surgery. Perioperative complications such as postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), postoperative behavioural disturbances and cardiorespiratory complications should be minimized in ambulatory anaesthesia. The choice of anaesthetic agents and techniques can influence the occurrence of these complications (...) and thus delay in discharge.The objective of this review was to evaluate the risk of complications (the risk of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), admission or readmission to hospital, postoperative behavioural disturbances and perioperative respiratory and cardiovascular complications) and recovery times (time to discharge from recovery ward and time to discharge from hospital) comparing the use of intravenous to inhalational anaesthesia for paediatric outpatient surgery.We searched

2014 Cochrane

113. Tracheal intubation with a flexible intubation scope versus other intubation techniques for obese patients requiring general anaesthesia. (PubMed)

Tracheal intubation with a flexible intubation scope versus other intubation techniques for obese patients requiring general anaesthesia. The prevalence of obesity (body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m(2)) is increasing in both developed and developing countries, leading to a rise in the numbers of obese patients requiring general anaesthesia. Obese patients are at increased risk of anaesthetic complications, and tracheal intubation can be more difficult. Flexible intubation scopes (FISs

2014 Cochrane

114. Guidelines on Checking Anaesthesia Delivery Systems Background Paper

Guidelines on Checking Anaesthesia Delivery Systems Background Paper PS31 BP 2014 Page 1 PS31 BP 2014 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Guidelines on Checking Anaesthesia Delivery Systems Background Paper 1. PURPOSE OF REVIEW Anaesthesia delivery systems continue to advance as a result of technology accompanied by increasing complexity of systems and their componentry. Delivery systems were originally confined to the administration of gases and volatile anaesthetic (...) agents. Now, however systems are also available for the administration of intravenous anaesthetic and analgesic agents. The inherent risks of anaesthesia delivery systems demand that measures are implemented to detect and prevent faults prior to equipment use. The document seeks to assist all personnel, whose roles involve interaction with anaesthesia delivery systems, to achieve the highest standards of safety for these systems. 2. BACKGROUND This document is intended to apply to all anaesthesia

2014 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

115. Guidelines on Checking Anaesthesia Delivery Systems

Guidelines on Checking Anaesthesia Delivery Systems PS31 2014 Page 1 PS31 2014 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Guidelines on Checking Anaesthesia Delivery Systems 1. INTRODUCTION An anaesthesia delivery system includes any equipment that can deliver gases, vapours, local anaesthetic or intravenous anaesthetic agents to induce and/or maintain anaesthesia. Failure of the anaesthesia delivery system can cause serious complications. This document is intended to assist (...) practitioners and health facilities to minimise equipment-related risks. This document applies wherever general anaesthesia, regional anaesthesia, local anaesthesia and/or sedation are administered by an anaesthetist. Henceforth, these activities are referred to as “anaesthesia”. 2. PRINCIPLES The following principles apply to the checking of anaesthesia delivery systems. 2.1 Responsibilities Each facility is required to designate an individual to be responsible for: 2.1.1 Servicing and maintaining

2014 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

116. Statement on Staffing of Accredited Departments of Anaesthesia

Statement on Staffing of Accredited Departments of Anaesthesia PS42 2017 Page 1 PS42 2017 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Statement on Staffing of Accredited Departments of Anaesthesia 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Purpose and scope The Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) recognises the important role of anaesthesia departments providing training within the ANZCA training program. This document is intended to apply to anaesthesia departments accredited (...) staff have adequate allocated time for professional development. Anaesthetists who contribute more heavily to teaching, training, research and administration will require more sessions for clinical support activities. 2.1.1 Director of anaesthesia The director has a primary managerial responsibility to ensure that the department functions safely and efficiently. The director of anaesthesia must be a registered medical practitioner who holds the fellowship of ANZCA, or suitable anaesthesia

2014 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

117. End-tidal Control software for use with Aisys closed circuit anaesthesia systems for automated gas control during general anaesthesia

End-tidal Control software for use with Aisys closed circuit anaesthesia systems for automated gas control during general anaesthesia End-tidal Control software for use with End-tidal Control software for use with Aisys Aisys closed circuit anaesthesia systems for closed circuit anaesthesia systems for automated gas control during gener automated gas control during general al anaesthesia anaesthesia Medtech innovation briefing Published: 16 September 2014 nice.org.uk/guidance/mib10 pathways © (...) NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 1 of 40Summary Summary Effectiv Effectiveness eness End-tidal Control is a gas delivery software option for the GE Healthcare Aisys Carestation and Aisys CS2 anaesthesia delivery systems. Five studies compared End-tidal Control with manual gas control: 1 randomised trial (n=200), 2 observational studies (n=3675, n=80), 1 service evaluation (n=489) and 1 audit

2014 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

118. Guidelines on Checking Anaesthesia Delivery Systems

Guidelines on Checking Anaesthesia Delivery Systems PS31 2014 Page 1 PS31 2014 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Guidelines on Checking Anaesthesia Delivery Systems 1. INTRODUCTION An anaesthesia delivery system includes any equipment that can deliver gases, vapours, local anaesthetic or intravenous anaesthetic agents to induce and/or maintain anaesthesia. Failure of the anaesthesia delivery system can cause serious complications. This document is intended to assist (...) practitioners and health facilities to minimise equipment-related risks. This document applies wherever general anaesthesia, regional anaesthesia, local anaesthesia and/or sedation are administered by an anaesthetist. Henceforth, these activities are referred to as “anaesthesia”. 2. PRINCIPLES The following principles apply to the checking of anaesthesia delivery systems. 2.1 Responsibilities Each facility is required to designate an individual to be responsible for: 2.1.1 Servicing and maintaining

2014 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

119. Guidance on the provision of anaesthesia services for post-operative care 2014

Guidance on the provision of anaesthesia services for post-operative care 2014 Document Store | The Royal College of Anaesthetists User menu Search Document Store This page displays listings of ALL publications added to the site. You can narrow down the list by entering keywords in the 'Search' field, and selecting 'Apply'. To filter the publications by section, tick the check-boxes of the desired sections, and select 'Apply'. You can set the ordering of the results by the publication title

2014 Royal College of Anaesthetists

120. Guidance on the provision of anaesthesia services for intra-operative care 2014

Guidance on the provision of anaesthesia services for intra-operative care 2014 Document Store | The Royal College of Anaesthetists User menu Search Document Store This page displays listings of ALL publications added to the site. You can narrow down the list by entering keywords in the 'Search' field, and selecting 'Apply'. To filter the publications by section, tick the check-boxes of the desired sections, and select 'Apply'. You can set the ordering of the results by the publication title

2014 Royal College of Anaesthetists