Latest & greatest articles for anaesthesia

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Anaesthesia

Clinical Anaesthesia is used to induce a temporary medical state of controlled unconsciousness, inducing a loss of sensation or awareness. There are three main types of Anaesthesia:

  • Local and Regional
  • General
  • Sedation

Anaesthesia is primarily used during surgical procedures to block pain. While unconscious, blood flow and heart rate is monitored.

Research and development in the use of Anaesthesia has helped anesthesiologists in the progression of patient safety before and after surgery and medical procedures. The developments and research of Anaesthesia through the years has massively influences medicine and surgery today.

Case studies and clinical trials help aid researchers in the development of aftercare during postoperative recovery. Research is a vital part in the field of Anaesthesia, it allows anesthesiologists to improve the delivery of patient safety while unconscious.

Learn more on the emerging technology in Anaesthesia and the advancements in Anaesthesia practise by searching Trip.

Top results for anaesthesia

41. Guidelines on Return to Anaesthesia Practice for Anaesthetists

Guidelines on Return to Anaesthesia Practice for Anaesthetists PS50 2017 Page 1 PS50 2017 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Guidelines on Return to Anaesthesia Practice for Anaesthetists 1. INTRODUCTION Anaesthesia is a high acuity specialty that requires the ability to make rapid and accurate clinical assessments, often concurrently with time-critical management decisions as well as undertake a range of technical skills. Performance of tasks at optimal levels depends (...) anaesthetists whose absence from clinical anaesthesia practice has been sufficient to warrant a formal return to practice program. Its purpose is to guide anaesthetists and those assisting them in developing, monitoring and successfully completing a return to practice program. The overall aim is to ensure that the returning anaesthetist provides safe and up-to-date care. Each individual anaesthetist has a responsibility to ensure that this is the case. 3. SCOPE This document applies to all anaesthetists

2017 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

42. Guidelines for the Safe Management and Use of Medications in Anaesthesia

Guidelines for the Safe Management and Use of Medications in Anaesthesia PS51 2018 Page 1 PS51 2018 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Guidelines for the Safe Management and Use of Medications in Anaesthesia 1. INTRODUCTION The safe administration of drugs in anaesthesia encompasses the timely administration of medication to patients, the prevention of drug administration errors, and measures to reduce the opportunity to misdirect drugs. Estimates of the frequency (...) of 'medication errors' range from 1 in 20 administration events 1 , to 1 in 133 2 anaesthesia episodes. Many of these reported events were protocol or process errors (including mislabelling or omission of an appropriate drug), however a proportion of these errors will result in an adverse event for the patient. More than 3 million anaesthetics are administered in Australia and New Zealand annually suggesting a substantial contribution to iatrogenic adverse events. Anaesthetists must be aware

2017 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

43. Statement on Staffing of Accredited Departments of Anaesthesia

Statement on Staffing of Accredited Departments of Anaesthesia PS42 2017 Page 1 PS42 2017 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Statement on Staffing of Accredited Departments of Anaesthesia 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Purpose and scope The Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) recognises the important role of anaesthesia departments providing training within the ANZCA training program. This document is intended to apply to anaesthesia departments accredited (...) staff have adequate allocated time for professional development. Anaesthetists who contribute more heavily to teaching, training, research and administration will require more sessions for clinical support activities. 2.1.1 Director of anaesthesia The director has a primary managerial responsibility to ensure that the department functions safely and efficiently. The director of anaesthesia must be a registered medical practitioner who holds the fellowship of ANZCA, or suitable anaesthesia

2017 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

44. Guidelines on Monitoring During Anaesthesia

Guidelines on Monitoring During Anaesthesia PS18 2017 Page 1 PS18 2017 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Guidelines on Monitoring During Anaesthesia 1. PURPOSE Clinical observation and assessment by a vigilant anaesthetist is essential for safe patient care during anaesthesia. The purpose of these guidelines is to guide practitioners on monitoring standards that should be applied to clinical management in order to optimise patient safety and quality care. 2. SCOPE (...) The terms “anaesthetist”, “medical practitioner” and “practitioner” are used interchangeably in this document. Although this document is primarily aimed at anaesthetists, any practitioner responsible for patient monitoring during “anaesthesia” should follow these guidelines. The following applies to the management of patients undergoing general anaesthesia, major regional anaesthesia/analgesia or sedation (to be collectively described by the term “anaesthesia”) for diagnostic or therapeutic procedures

2017 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

45. Guidelines on Monitoring During Anaesthesia Background Paper

Guidelines on Monitoring During Anaesthesia Background Paper PS18 BP 2017 Page 1 PS18 BP 2017 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Guidelines on Monitoring During Anaesthesia Background Paper PURPOSE Monitoring is an integral part of observation and recording contributing to the management of anaesthesia and outcomes. In the perioperative period clinical changes can occur rapidly and at times unexpectedly, and consequently it is fundamental that such changes are detected (...) from “Recommendations” to “Guidelines”. “Guidelines” offer advice on clinical and non- clinical aspects of the practice of anaesthesia and perioperative medicine, reflecting expert consensus and supported by other evidence when available. SCOPE PS18 is intended to apply wherever anaesthesia is administered and includes general anaesthesia, sedation, and major regional analgesia. While general anaesthesia and major regional analgesia is performed by anaesthetists, conscious sedation is administered

2017 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

46. Position in the second stage of labour for women without epidural anaesthesia. (PubMed)

Position in the second stage of labour for women without epidural anaesthesia. For centuries, there has been controversy around whether being upright (sitting, birthing stools, chairs, squatting, kneeling) or lying down (lateral (Sim's) position, semi-recumbent, lithotomy position, Trendelenburg's position) have advantages for women giving birth to their babies. This is an update of a review previously published in 2012, 2004 and 1999.To determine the possible benefits and risks of the use (...) of different birth positions during the second stage of labour without epidural anaesthesia, on maternal, fetal, neonatal and caregiver outcomes.We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register (30 November 2016) and reference lists of retrieved studies.Randomised, quasi-randomised or cluster-randomised controlled trials of any upright position assumed by pregnant women during the second stage of labour compared with supine or lithotomy positions. Secondary comparisons include comparison

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2017 Cochrane

47. New global surgical and anaesthesia indicators in the World Development Indicators dataset (PubMed)

New global surgical and anaesthesia indicators in the World Development Indicators dataset 29225929 2018 11 13 2059-7908 2 2 2017 BMJ global health BMJ Glob Health New global surgical and anaesthesia indicators in the World Development Indicators dataset. e000265 10.1136/bmjgh-2016-000265 Raykar Nakul P NP Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Program in Global Surgery and Social Change, Harvard Medical School, Boston

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2017 BMJ global health

48. Joint professional guidance on the use of general anaesthesia in young children

Joint professional guidance on the use of general anaesthesia in young children 18 April, 2017 Joint professional guidance on the use of general anaesthesia in young children Executive summary • Studies on immature animals have demonstrated that general anaesthetic agents can induce changes in the central nervous system. Some of these studies have also suggested longer-term effects on learning and memory tests. • To date the results from both epidemiological studies and prospective trials (...) in the human infant have failed to show adverse effects on cognitive development from a single anaesthetic episode of short duration (less than an hour). Data from longer exposures and multiple exposures to surgery and anaesthesia are difficult to interpret due to multiple confounding variables. • Continuing to use reliable familiar techniques for paediatric anaesthesia is emphasised. There is no evidence of a particular anaesthetic technique being better than another in terms of influencing any potential

2017 Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland

49. Total intravenous anaesthesia versus inhalational anaesthesia for adults undergoing transabdominal robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery. (PubMed)

Total intravenous anaesthesia versus inhalational anaesthesia for adults undergoing transabdominal robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery. Rapid implementation of robotic transabdominal surgery has resulted in the need for re-evaluation of the most suitable form of anaesthesia. The overall objective of anaesthesia is to minimize perioperative risk and discomfort for patients both during and after surgery. Anaesthesia for patients undergoing robotic assisted surgery is different from anaesthesia (...) for patients undergoing open or laparoscopic surgery; new anaesthetic concerns accompany robotic assisted surgery.To assess outcomes related to the choice of total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) or inhalational anaesthesia for adults undergoing transabdominal robotic assisted laparoscopic gynaecological, urological or gastroenterological surgery.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016 Issue 5), Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to May 2016), Embase via OvidSP (1982 to May 2016

2017 Cochrane

50. Does the exposure to general anaesthesia in children affect long-term academic and cognitive performance?

Does the exposure to general anaesthesia in children affect long-term academic and cognitive performance? Does the exposure to general anaesthesia in children affect long-term academic and cognitive performance? - Evidencias en pediatría Searching, please wait Show menu Library Management You did not add any article to your library yet. | Search Evidence-Based decision making Evidence-Based decision making Show menu Library Management You did not add any article to your library yet. × User (...) Password Log in × Reset password If you need to reset your password please enter your email and click the Send button. You will receive an email to complete the process. Email Send × Library Management × March 2017. Volume 13. Number 1 Does the exposure to general anaesthesia in children affect long-term academic and cognitive performance? Rating: 0 (0 Votes) Reviewers: , . | Newsletter Free Subscription Regularly recieve most recent articles by e-mail Subscribe × Newsletter subscription: Email Confirm

2017 Evidencias en Pediatría

51. Position in the second stage of labour for women with epidural anaesthesia. (PubMed)

Position in the second stage of labour for women with epidural anaesthesia. Epidural analgesia for pain relief in labour prolongs the second stage of labour and results in more instrumental deliveries. It has been suggested that a more upright position of the mother during all or part of the second stage may counteract these adverse effects. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2013.To assess the effects of different birthing positions (upright and recumbent) during

2017 Cochrane

52. Topical anaesthesia for needle-related pain in newborn infants. (PubMed)

Topical anaesthesia for needle-related pain in newborn infants. Hospitalised newborn neonates frequently undergo painful invasive procedures that involve penetration of the skin and other tissues by a needle. One intervention that can be used prior to a needle insertion procedure is application of a topical local anaesthetic.To evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical anaesthetics such as amethocaine and EMLA in newborn term or preterm infants requiring an invasive procedure involving

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2017 Cochrane

53. Consent for anaesthesia

Consent for anaesthesia Published by The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain & Ireland 21 Portland Place, London, W1B 1PY Tel: 020 7631 1650 Fax: 020 7631 4352 Email: info@aagbi.org www.aagbi.org January 2017 AAGBI: Consent for anaesthesia 2017This guideline was originally published in Anaesthesia. If you wish to refer to this guideline, please use the following reference: Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland. AAGBI: Consent for anaesthesia 2017. Anaesthesia 2017 (...) ; 72: 93-105. This guideline can be viewed online via the following URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/anae.13762/fullGuidelines AAGBI: Consent for anaesthesia 2017 Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland S. M. Yentis, 1 A. J. Hartle, 2 I. R. Barker, 3 P. Barker, 4 D. G. Bogod, 5 T. H. Clutton-Brock, 6 A. Ruck Keene, 7 S. Leifer, 8 A. Naughton 9 and E. Plunkett 10 1 Consultant Anaesthetist, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London and Honorary Reader, Imperial College

2017 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

54. Efficacy of therapeutic suggestions in adults undergoing surgery or medical procedures under general anaesthesia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Efficacy of therapeutic suggestions in adults undergoing surgery or medical procedures under general anaesthesia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Untitled Document PROSPERO will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2017 PROSPERO

55. Hyperbaric versus isobaric bupivacaine for spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. (PubMed)

Hyperbaric versus isobaric bupivacaine for spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. Bupivacaine is an amide local anaesthetic used in hyperbaric and isobaric forms. These are administered intrathecally into the spine to provide regional anaesthesia for caesarean section. Several trials have compared hyperbaric and isobaric bupivacaine but none have conclusively shown the benefit of either. This review was first published in 2013 and updated in 2016.Our objectives were to:1. Determine (...) the effectiveness of hyperbaric bupivacaine compared to isobaric bupivacaine for spinal anaesthesia in women undergoing caesarean section;2. Determine the safety of hyperbaric bupivacaine compared to isobaric bupivacaine for spinal anaesthesia in women undergoing caesarean section.We originally searched the following databases to January 2011: CENTRAL, MEDLINE and Embase.For this update, we reran our search in the above databases from January 2011 to March 2016; two studies are awaiting a response from authors

2016 Cochrane

56. Intravenous versus inhalational techniques for rapid emergence from anaesthesia in patients undergoing brain tumour surgery. (PubMed)

Intravenous versus inhalational techniques for rapid emergence from anaesthesia in patients undergoing brain tumour surgery. Brain tumour surgery usually is carried out with the patient under general anaesthesia. Over past years, both intravenous and inhalational anaesthetic agents have been used, but the superiority of one agent over the other is a topic of ongoing debate. Early and rapid emergence from anaesthesia is desirable for most neurosurgical patients. With the availability of newer (...) intravenous and inhalational anaesthetic agents, all of which have inherent advantages and disadvantages, we remain uncertain as to which technique may result in more rapid early recovery from anaesthesia.To assess the effects of intravenous versus inhalational techniques for rapid emergence from anaesthesia in patients undergoing brain tumour surgery.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 6) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE via Ovid SP (1966 to June 2014

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2016 Cochrane

57. [Single Subcutaneous Palmar Injection vs. 2 Dorsal Injections for Finger Anaesthesia in Hand Surgery - Randomised Prospective Comparison of Application Pain and Efficacy]. (PubMed)

[Single Subcutaneous Palmar Injection vs. 2 Dorsal Injections for Finger Anaesthesia in Hand Surgery - Randomised Prospective Comparison of Application Pain and Efficacy]. This randomised prospective study compared pain during application and efficacy of the palmar subcutaneous single injection block (PSSIB) and the traditional dorsal 2 injection block (DTIB).During a 2 year period, a total of 190 patients with an average age of 43 years (18-82) and an isolated finger injury were included

2016 Handchirurgie, Mikrochirurgie, plastische Chirurgie : Organ der Deutschsprachigen Arbeitsgemeinschaft fur Handchirurgie : Organ der Deutschsprachigen Arbeitsgemeinschaft fur Mikrochirurgie der Peripheren Nerven und Gefasse : Organ der V...

58. Change in children's oral health-related quality of life following dental treatment under general anaesthesia for the management of dental caries: a systematic review. (PubMed)

Change in children's oral health-related quality of life following dental treatment under general anaesthesia for the management of dental caries: a systematic review. Dental caries has significant impact on children and their families and may necessitate treatment under general anaesthesia (GA). The use of oral health-related quality-of-life (OHRQoL) measures enables evaluation of dental treatment from a patient's perspective.This systematic review aimed to assess change in OHRQoL in children

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2016 International journal of paediatric dentistry / the British Paedodontic Society [and] the International Association of Dentistry for Children

59. Nitrous oxide-based versus nitrous oxide-free general anaesthesia and accidental awareness during general anaesthesia in surgical patients. (PubMed)

Nitrous oxide-based versus nitrous oxide-free general anaesthesia and accidental awareness during general anaesthesia in surgical patients. Accidental awareness during general anaesthesia (AAGA) is when a patient unintentionally becomes conscious during a procedure performed with general anaesthesia and subsequently has explicit recall of this event. Incidence estimates for AAGA vary, with the most common estimate being one to two cases per 1000 general anaesthetics. Evidence linking nitrous (...) oxide use and an increased risk of AAGA has come from observational studies data but the literature is contradictory, with some studies finding a protective effect of nitrous oxide.To assess the effect of general anaesthesia including nitrous oxide on the risk of AAGA in patients aged five years and over.We searched the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and trial registers ((www.clinicaltrials.gov), the WHO International Clinical Trials

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2016 Cochrane

60. Effect of regional versus local anaesthesia on outcome after arteriovenous fistula creation: a randomised controlled trial. (PubMed)

Effect of regional versus local anaesthesia on outcome after arteriovenous fistula creation: a randomised controlled trial. Arteriovenous fistulae are the optimum form of vascular access in end-stage renal failure. However, they have a high early failure rate. Regional compared with local anaesthesia results in greater vasodilatation and increases short-term blood flow. This study investigated whether regional compared with local anaesthesia improved medium-term arteriovenous fistula (...) patency.This observer-blinded, randomised controlled trial was done at three university hospitals in Glasgow, UK. Adults undergoing primary radiocephalic or brachiocephalic arteriovenous fistula creation were randomly assigned (1:1; in blocks of eight) using a computer-generated allocation system to receive either local anaesthesia (0·5% L-bupivacaine and 1% lidocaine injected subcutaneously) or regional (brachial plexus block [BPB]) anaesthesia (0·5% L-bupivacaine and 1·5% lidocaine with epinephrine

2016 Lancet