Latest & greatest articles for anaesthesia

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on anaesthesia and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Anaesthesia

Clinical Anaesthesia is used to induce a temporary medical state of controlled unconsciousness, inducing a loss of sensation or awareness. There are three main types of Anaesthesia:

  • Local and Regional
  • General
  • Sedation

Anaesthesia is primarily used during surgical procedures to block pain. While unconscious, blood flow and heart rate is monitored.

Research and development in the use of Anaesthesia has helped anesthesiologists in the progression of patient safety before and after surgery and medical procedures. The developments and research of Anaesthesia through the years has massively influences medicine and surgery today.

Case studies and clinical trials help aid researchers in the development of aftercare during postoperative recovery. Research is a vital part in the field of Anaesthesia, it allows anesthesiologists to improve the delivery of patient safety while unconscious.

Learn more on the emerging technology in Anaesthesia and the advancements in Anaesthesia practise by searching Trip.

Top results for anaesthesia

261. Guideline for the Use of General Anaesthesia (GA) in Paediatric Dentistry

Guideline for the Use of General Anaesthesia (GA) in Paediatric Dentistry May 2008 final 1 UK National Clinical Guidelines in Paediatric Dentistry Guideline for the Use of General Anaesthesia (GA) in Paediatric Dentistry Contents: 1. Introduction 2. Indications for the use of GA in children 3. Circumstances and conditions suitable for GA 4. Circumstances and conditions which do NOT justify GA 5. Children with medical problems 6. Explanation of risk 7. Treatment planning 7.1 Radiographs 7.2 (...) that children and adolescents receive safe and effective pain control. A range of techniques are available, comprising four overlapping categories: behavioural techniques, local anaesthesia (LA), conscious sedation, and general anaesthesia (GA) (Figure 1). Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of comprehensive treatment planning to ensure a satisfactory standard of oral health after a dental GA. 2. Indications for the use of GA in children. There are essentially only two indications for GA

2008 Royal College of Surgeons of England

262. Epidural analgesia/anaesthesia versus systemic intravenous opioid analgesia in the management of blunt thoracic trauma.

Epidural analgesia/anaesthesia versus systemic intravenous opioid analgesia in the management of blunt thoracic trauma. BestBets: Epidural analgesia/anaesthesia versus systemic intravenous opioid analgesia in the management of blunt thoracic trauma. Epidural analgesia/anaesthesia versus systemic intravenous opioid analgesia in the management of blunt thoracic trauma. Report By: Dr Richard Parris - Consultant in Emergency Medicine Search checked by Barbara Scobie - ST3 in Emergency Medicine (...) anaesthesia OR thorax epidural] COCHRANE: Thoracic trauma [exp. thoracic injuries] AND [exp. analgesia-epidural OR anaesthesia-epidural OR injection-epidural OR analgesia-patient controlled OR analgesics-opioid] Search Outcome Medline produced 56 papers, EMBASE 103, of which four were relevant and of sufficient quality. Relevant Paper(s) Author, date and country Patient group Study type (level of evidence) Outcomes Key results Study Weaknesses Mackersie et al 1991 USA 32 patients recruited with: - 3

2007 BestBETS

263. Topical anaesthesia alone versus topical anaesthesia with intracameral lidocaine for phacoemulsification. (PubMed)

Topical anaesthesia alone versus topical anaesthesia with intracameral lidocaine for phacoemulsification. Cataract is defined as loss of transparency of the natural lens and is usually an age-related phenomenon. The only recognized treatment available for cataract involves surgery. An ideal anaesthetic should allow for pain-free surgery with no systemic or local complications. It should be cost effective and should facilitate a stress-free procedure for surgeon and patient alike. Topical (...) anaesthesia involves applying anaesthetic eye drops to the surface of the eye prior to and during surgery. This has found large acceptance especially in the USA where it is used by 61% of cataract surgeons. Many surgeons who perform cataract surgery under topical anaesthesia also use intraoperative supplementary intracameral lidocaine (injected directly into the anterior chamber of the eye). The benefits and possible risks of intracameral lidocaine have been assessed by a number of randomized controlled

2007 Cochrane

264. Sub-Tenon's anaesthesia versus topical anaesthesia for cataract surgery. (PubMed)

Sub-Tenon's anaesthesia versus topical anaesthesia for cataract surgery. Local anaesthesia for cataract surgery can be provided by either sub-Tenon or topical anaesthesia. Although there is some work suggesting advantages to both techniques, there has been no recent systematic attempt to compare both techniques for all relevant outcomes.To compare the effectiveness of topical anaesthesia (with or without the addition of intracameral local anaesthetic) and sub-Tenon's anaesthesia in providing (...) pain relief during cataract surgery.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, 2006, Issue 2); MEDLINE (1990 to July 2006); EMBASE (1990 to July 2006) and reference lists of articles. There were no constraints based on language or publication status.We included all randomized or quasi-randomized studies comparing sub-Tenon anaesthesia with topical anaesthesia for cataract surgery.Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We

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2007 Cochrane

265. Remifentanil for general anaesthesia: a systematic review

Remifentanil for general anaesthesia: a systematic review Remifentanil for general anaesthesia: a systematic review Remifentanil for general anaesthesia: a systematic review Komatsu R, Turan A M, Orhan-Sungur M, McGuire J, Radke O C, Apfel C C CRD summary This generally well-conducted review compared remifentanil with fentanyl, alfentanil or sufentanil for analgesia during general anaesthesia. The authors concluded that remifentanil induced deeper analgesia and anaesthesia. Patients given (...) remifentanil showed faster recovery times but needed post-operative analgesia more frequently. The review included a large number of patients and, despite some concerns about the synthesis, the authors' conclusions are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To evaluate the intra-operative and post-operative efficacy and safety of remifentanil as an analgesic supplement during general anaesthesia compared with other currently used opioids. Searching MEDLINE, an ISI index and the Cochrane Library were

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2007 DARE.

266. Recommendations for standards of monitoring during anaesthesia and recovery : fourth edition

Recommendations for standards of monitoring during anaesthesia and recovery : fourth edition Published by The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland, 21 Portland Place, London W1B 1PY Telephone 020 76311650 Fax 020 7631 4352 www.aagbi.org March 2007 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR STANDARDS OF MONITORING DURING ANAESTHESIA AND RECOVERY 4th EditionMEMbERSHIp OF THE wORkING pARTY Dr R J S Birks Chairman/Vice President Dr L W Gemmell Council Member Dr E P O’Sullivan Council Member Prof D J (...) Rowbotham Council Member Prof J R Sneyd Council Member Ex-Officio Dr D K Whitaker President Prof M Harmer Immediate Past President Dr I H Wilson Honorary Treasurer Dr A W Harrop-Griffiths Honorary Secretary Prof W A Chambers Immediate Past Honorary Secretary Dr I G Johnston Honorary Membership Secretary Dr D G Bogod Editor-in-Chief, Anaesthesia This document will be reviewed regularly and may be revised or updated before the formal publication of a new edition. For the latest version, please refer

2007 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

267. Regional versus general anaesthesia for caesarean section. (PubMed)

Regional versus general anaesthesia for caesarean section. Regional and general anaesthesia (GA) are commonly used for caesarean section (CS) and both have advantages and disadvantages. It is important to clarify what type of anaesthesia is more efficacious.To compare the effects of regional anaesthesia (RA) with those of GA on the outcomes of CS.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 December 2005), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (...) (The Cochrane Library 2005, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1966 to December 2005), and EMBASE (1980 to December 2005).Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials evaluating the use of RA and GA in women who had CS for any indication.Two authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, data extraction and trial quality.Sixteen studies (1586 women) were included in this review. Women who had either epidural anaesthesia or spinal anaesthesia were found to have a significantly lower difference between pre

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2006 Cochrane

268. Techniques for preventing hypotension during spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. (PubMed)

Techniques for preventing hypotension during spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. Maternal hypotension, the most frequent complication of spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section, can be associated with severe nausea or vomiting which can pose serious risks to the mother (unconsciousness, pulmonary aspiration) and baby (hypoxia, acidosis and neurological injury).To assess the effects of prophylactic interventions for hypotension following spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section.We (...) searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (November 2005).Randomised controlled trials comparing interventions to prevent hypotension with placebo or alternative treatment in women having spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section.Three review authors independently assessed eligibility and methodological quality of studies, and extracted data.We included 75 trials (a total of 4624 women). Crystalloids were more effective than no fluids (relative risk (RR) 0.78, 95% confidence

2006 Cochrane

269. Opioid antagonists under heavy sedation or anaesthesia for opioid withdrawal. (PubMed)

Opioid antagonists under heavy sedation or anaesthesia for opioid withdrawal. Withdrawal (detoxification) is necessary prior to drug-free treatment. It may also represent the end point of long-term opioid replacement treatment such as methadone maintenance. The availability of managed withdrawal is essential to an effective treatment system.To assess the effectiveness of interventions involving the administration of opioid antagonists to induce opioid withdrawal with concomitant heavy sedation (...) or anaesthesia, in terms of withdrawal signs and symptoms, completion of treatment and adverse effects.We searched the Drugs and Alcohol Group register (October 2003), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2004), Medline (January 1966 to January 2005), Embase (January 1985 to January 2005), PsycINFO (1967 to January 2005), and Cinahl (1982 to December 2004) and reference lists of studies.Controlled trials comparing antagonist-induced withdrawal under heavy sedation

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2006 Cochrane

270. Consent for anaesthesia 2 revised edition 2006

Consent for anaesthesia 2 revised edition 2006 2 Published by The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland, 21 Portland Place, London W1B 1PY Telephone: 020 7631 8801/8804 E-mail: info@aagbi.org Website: www.aagbi.org January 2006 Consent for Anaesthesia Revised Edition 2006 Consent A5 10/1/06 15:49 Page 1MEMBERSHIP OF THE WORKING PARTY Dr D G Bogod Chairman; Editor-in-Chief, Anaesthesia. Professor W A Chambers Honorary Secretary, AAGBI; Scottish Representative Dr Les Gemill (...) and training 27 Section 11 References 30 1 Consent A5 10/1/06 15:49 Page 1Section 1 Recommendations • Information about anaesthesia, preferably in the form of a patient- friendly leaflet, should be provided to patients undergoing elective surgery before they meet their anaesthetist. • The anaesthetic room immediately before induction is not an acceptable place or time to provide elective patients with new information other than in exceptional circumstances. • The amount and the nature of information

2006 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

271. Early recovery, cognitive function and costs of a desflurane inhalational versus a total intravenous anaesthesia regimen in long-term surgery

Early recovery, cognitive function and costs of a desflurane inhalational versus a total intravenous anaesthesia regimen in long-term surgery Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2006 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

272. The Anaesthesia Record. Recommendations on the Recording of an Episode of Anaesthesia Care

The Anaesthesia Record. Recommendations on the Recording of an Episode of Anaesthesia Care AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND COLLEGE OF ANAESTHETISTS ABN 82 055 042 852 THE ANAESTHESIA RECORD RECOMMENDATIONS ON THE RECORDING OF AN EPISODE OF ANAESTHESIA CARE INTRODUCTION The anaesthesia record is an essential part of the patient's medical record. The record should allow the anaesthetist to document all aspects of the anaesthesia management, including the pre and post-operative management (...) , that are of relevance to the anaesthesia. The anaesthesia record provides information that may assist other staff involved in the care of the patient and to any subsequent anaesthetists. It may also be of medico-legal importance and can be used for quality assurance and research purposes. The record must be signed by the anaesthetist/s. The information may be on a single record or may be covered by separate records for the pre-anaesthesia, anaesthesia and post- anaesthesia phases of the patient’s care. All

2006 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

273. Statement on Credentialling and Defining the Scope of Clinical Practice in Anaesthesia

Statement on Credentialling and Defining the Scope of Clinical Practice in Anaesthesia PS02 2018 Page 1 PS02 2018 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Statement on Credentialling and Defining the Scope of Clinical Practice in Anaesthesia 1. INTRODUCTION Credentialling in anaesthesia allows registered medical practitioners to provide clinical services at healthcare institutions. Credentialling is an integral part of the process of verification of professional standing (...) and quality assurance, sets the standard required for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and offers its CPD program to all medical practitioners in Australia and New Zealand who provide anaesthesia services. New Fellows of the College are trained in broad areas of anaesthesia and capable of providing services in health care facilities with appropriate support. Some specific areas of complex anaesthesia practice may benefit from further training and relevant CPD subsequent to obtaining Fellowship

2006 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

274. Recommendations for the Post-Anaesthesia Recovery Room

Recommendations for the Post-Anaesthesia Recovery Room PS04 2018 Page 1 PS04 2018 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Statement on the Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit 1. INTRODUCTION An appropriately planned, equipped, staffed and managed post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU) is essential for the safe management of patients who have recently undergone surgery or other procedures, irrespective of the type of anaesthesia or sedation used. The spectrum of healthcare facilities (...) . Facility design and resources, including staff and equipment, should align with the procedure, proposed anaesthesia or sedation and patient complexity (including age and co-morbidities) as well as the post procedure destination of the patient. 2. PURPOSE The purpose of this document is: 2.1 To assist healthcare facilities to provide PACUs that are designed, equipped, and staffed to deliver safe patient care. 2.2 To inform clinicians of ANZCA’s expectations for PACUs. 3. SCOPE This document is intended

2006 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

275. Guidelines to Fellows Acting on Appointments Committees for Senior Staff in Anaesthesia

Guidelines to Fellows Acting on Appointments Committees for Senior Staff in Anaesthesia Review PS44(2006) AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND COLLEGE OF ANAESTHETISTS ABN 82 055 042 852 GUIDELINES TO FELLOWS ACTING ON APPOINTMENTS COMMITTEES FOR SENIOR STAFF IN ANAESTHESIA The College considers that it should provide advice to Appointments Committees in Australia or New Zealand when appointments in anaesthesia are being considered. This is best carried out by designating a specific Fellow to work (...) the Fellowship of this College or will hold that Fellowship by the date on which –he/she takes up appointment. 1.2 Hold another specialist qualification in anaesthesia. In this situation, the implications in respect of Overseas Trained Specialist Assessment by the College and registration as a specialist in Australia or New Zealand must be considered. 1.3 Have appropriate experience for the position under consideration. 1.4 Are participating in continuing medical education and quality assurance activities

2006 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

276. Guidelines to Fellows Acting on Appointments Committees for Senior Staff in Anaesthesia

Guidelines to Fellows Acting on Appointments Committees for Senior Staff in Anaesthesia Review PS44(2006) AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND COLLEGE OF ANAESTHETISTS ABN 82 055 042 852 GUIDELINES TO FELLOWS ACTING ON APPOINTMENTS COMMITTEES FOR SENIOR STAFF IN ANAESTHESIA The College considers that it should provide advice to Appointments Committees in Australia or New Zealand when appointments in anaesthesia are being considered. This is best carried out by designating a specific Fellow to work (...) the Fellowship of this College or will hold that Fellowship by the date on which –he/she takes up appointment. 1.2 Hold another specialist qualification in anaesthesia. In this situation, the implications in respect of Overseas Trained Specialist Assessment by the College and registration as a specialist in Australia or New Zealand must be considered. 1.3 Have appropriate experience for the position under consideration. 1.4 Are participating in continuing medical education and quality assurance activities

2006 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

277. The Anaesthesia Record. Recommendations on the Recording of an Episode of Anaesthesia Care

The Anaesthesia Record. Recommendations on the Recording of an Episode of Anaesthesia Care AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND COLLEGE OF ANAESTHETISTS ABN 82 055 042 852 THE ANAESTHESIA RECORD RECOMMENDATIONS ON THE RECORDING OF AN EPISODE OF ANAESTHESIA CARE INTRODUCTION The anaesthesia record is an essential part of the patient's medical record. The record should allow the anaesthetist to document all aspects of the anaesthesia management, including the pre and post-operative management (...) , that are of relevance to the anaesthesia. The anaesthesia record provides information that may assist other staff involved in the care of the patient and to any subsequent anaesthetists. It may also be of medico-legal importance and can be used for quality assurance and research purposes. The record must be signed by the anaesthetist/s. The information may be on a single record or may be covered by separate records for the pre-anaesthesia, anaesthesia and post- anaesthesia phases of the patient’s care. All

2006 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

278. Statement on Credentialling and Defining the Scope of Clinical Practice in Anaesthesia

Statement on Credentialling and Defining the Scope of Clinical Practice in Anaesthesia PS02 2018 Page 1 PS02 2018 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Statement on Credentialling and Defining the Scope of Clinical Practice in Anaesthesia 1. INTRODUCTION Credentialling in anaesthesia allows registered medical practitioners to provide clinical services at healthcare institutions. Credentialling is an integral part of the process of verification of professional standing (...) and quality assurance, sets the standard required for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and offers its CPD program to all medical practitioners in Australia and New Zealand who provide anaesthesia services. New Fellows of the College are trained in broad areas of anaesthesia and capable of providing services in health care facilities with appropriate support. Some specific areas of complex anaesthesia practice may benefit from further training and relevant CPD subsequent to obtaining Fellowship

2006 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

279. Recommendations for the Post-Anaesthesia Recovery Room

Recommendations for the Post-Anaesthesia Recovery Room PS04 2018 Page 1 PS04 2018 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Statement on the Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit 1. INTRODUCTION An appropriately planned, equipped, staffed and managed post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU) is essential for the safe management of patients who have recently undergone surgery or other procedures, irrespective of the type of anaesthesia or sedation used. The spectrum of healthcare facilities (...) . Facility design and resources, including staff and equipment, should align with the procedure, proposed anaesthesia or sedation and patient complexity (including age and co-morbidities) as well as the post procedure destination of the patient. 2. PURPOSE The purpose of this document is: 2.1 To assist healthcare facilities to provide PACUs that are designed, equipped, and staffed to deliver safe patient care. 2.2 To inform clinicians of ANZCA’s expectations for PACUs. 3. SCOPE This document is intended

2006 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

280. Sugammadex (Org 25969) for reversal of muscle relaxation in general anaesthesia: horizon scanning technology briefing

Sugammadex (Org 25969) for reversal of muscle relaxation in general anaesthesia: horizon scanning technology briefing Sugammadex (Org 25969) for reversal of muscle relaxation in general anaesthesia: horizon scanning technology briefing Sugammadex (Org 25969) for reversal of muscle relaxation in general anaesthesia: horizon scanning technology briefing NHSC Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation (...) of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation NHSC. Sugammadex (Org 25969) for reversal of muscle relaxation in general anaesthesia: horizon scanning technology briefing. Birmingham: National Horizon Scanning Centre (NHSC). 2006 Authors' objectives This study examines the use of Sugammadex (Org 25969) for reversal of muscle relaxation in general anaesthesia. Timeliness warning Available on request from NHSC. Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned

2006 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.