Latest & greatest articles for anaesthesia

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on anaesthesia or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on anaesthesia and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Anaesthesia

Clinical Anaesthesia is used to induce a temporary medical state of controlled unconsciousness, inducing a loss of sensation or awareness. There are three main types of Anaesthesia:

  • Local and Regional
  • General
  • Sedation

Anaesthesia is primarily used during surgical procedures to block pain. While unconscious, blood flow and heart rate is monitored.

Research and development in the use of Anaesthesia has helped anesthesiologists in the progression of patient safety before and after surgery and medical procedures. The developments and research of Anaesthesia through the years has massively influences medicine and surgery today.

Case studies and clinical trials help aid researchers in the development of aftercare during postoperative recovery. Research is a vital part in the field of Anaesthesia, it allows anesthesiologists to improve the delivery of patient safety while unconscious.

Learn more on the emerging technology in Anaesthesia and the advancements in Anaesthesia practise by searching Trip.

Top results for anaesthesia

204. Bispectral index monitoring to prevent awareness during anaesthesia: the B-Aware randomised controlled trial.

Bispectral index monitoring to prevent awareness during anaesthesia: the B-Aware randomised controlled trial. 15172773 2004 06 02 2004 06 15 2015 06 16 1474-547X 363 9423 2004 May 29 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Bispectral index monitoring to prevent awareness during anaesthesia: the B-Aware randomised controlled trial. 1757-63 Awareness is an uncommon complication of anaesthesia, affecting 0.1-0.2% of all surgical patients. Bispectral index (BIS) monitoring measures the depth of anaesthesia (...) and facilitates anaesthetic titration. In this trial we determined whether BIS-guided anaesthesia reduced the incidence of awareness during surgery in adults. We did a prospective, randomised, double-blind, multicentre trial. Adult patients at high risk of awareness were randomly allocated to BIS-guided anaesthesia or routine care. Patients were assessed by a blinded observer for awareness at 2-6 h, 24-36 h, and 30 days after surgery. An independent committee, blinded to group identity, assessed every report

Lancet2004

205. Anaesthesia, surgery, and challenges in postoperative recovery.

Anaesthesia, surgery, and challenges in postoperative recovery. Surgical injury can be followed by pain, nausea, vomiting and ileus, stress-induced catabolism, impaired pulmonary function, increased cardiac demands, and risk of thromboembolism. These problems can lead to complications, need for treatment in hospital, postoperative fatigue, and delayed convalescence. Development of safe and short-acting anaesthetics, improved pain relief by early intervention with multimodal analgesia, and (...) stress reduction by regional anaesthetic techniques, beta-blockade, or glucocorticoids have provided important possibilities for enhanced recovery. When these techniques are combined with a change in perioperative care a pronounced enhancement of recovery and decrease in hospital stay can be achieved, even in major operations. The anaesthetist has an important role in facilitating early postoperative recovery by provision of minimally-invasive anaesthesia and pain relief, and by collaborating

Lancet2003

206. Perioperative management and monitoring in anaesthesia.

Perioperative management and monitoring in anaesthesia. In recent years, several risk factors for adverse outcome in patients undergoing anaesthesia have been identified. Besides human errors, cardiovascular and respiratory complications are associated with substantial morbidity. Assessment of complications has promoted the introduction of basic physiological monitoring in clinical practice. Whether monitoring directly affects outcome is not proven; however, circumstantial evidence suggests (...) that basic cardiorespiratory monitoring decreases the incidence of serious accidents. Prevention of hypothermia also reduces anaesthesia-related morbidity. Measurement of body temperature is mandatory, and active warming is a simple, effective technique to avoid hypothermia. Evidence is growing that patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease should be treated with beta blockers perioperatively. Whether the type of anaesthesia-ie, general or regional-is relevant to perioperative mortality

Lancet2003

207. Anaesthesia: the patient's point of view.

Anaesthesia: the patient's point of view. Patients scheduled for surgical procedures continue to express concerns about their safety, outcome, and comfort. All medical interventions carry risks, but the patient often considers anaesthesia as the intervention with the greatest risk. Many still worry that they will not wake up after their surgery, or that they will be awake during the operation. Such events have received attention from the media, but are very rare. Challenges to improve (...) the comfort of patients continue, especially with regard to the almost universal problems of nausea, vomiting, and pain after surgery. A newer concern is that patients will develop some degree of mental impairment that may delay return to a full work and social lifestyle for days and weeks. Developments in technology, education, and training have had a major effect on anaesthetic practice, so that anaesthesia is increasingly regarded as safe for the patient. This article explores patients' concerns

Lancet2003

208. Clinical and economic choices in anaesthesia for day surgery: a prospective randomised controlled trial

Clinical and economic choices in anaesthesia for day surgery: a prospective randomised controlled trial Clinical and economic choices in anaesthesia for day surgery: a prospective randomised controlled trial Clinical and economic choices in anaesthesia for day surgery: a prospective randomised controlled trial Elliott R A, Payne K, Moore J K, Harper N J, St Leger A S, Moore E W, Thoms G M, Pollard B J, McHugh G A, Bennett J, Lawrence G, Kerr J, Davies L M Record Status This is a critical (...) abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The study compared four general anaesthetic agents for induction/maintenance in adult day surgery, and two general anaesthetic agents in paediatric day surgery. The anaesthetics used for adults were propofol/propofol

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2003

209. Local, regional, or general anaesthesia in groin hernia repair: multicentre randomised trial.

Local, regional, or general anaesthesia in groin hernia repair: multicentre randomised trial. 13678971 2003 09 18 2003 11 03 2015 06 16 1474-547X 362 9387 2003 Sep 13 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Local, regional, or general anaesthesia in groin hernia repair: multicentre randomised trial. 853-8 In specialised centres, local anaesthesia is almost always used in groin hernia surgery; whereas in routine surgical practice, regional or general anaesthesia are the methods of choice. In this three (...) -arm multicentre randomised trial, we aimed to compare the three methods of anaesthesia and to determine the extent to which general surgeons can reproduce the excellent results obtained with local anaesthesia in specialised hernia centres. Between January, 1999, and December, 2001, 616 patients at ten hospitals, were randomly assigned to have either local, regional, or general anaesthesia. Primary endpoints were early and late postoperative complications. Secondary endpoints were duration

Lancet2003

210. Transient neurologic symptoms (TNS) following spinal anaesthesia with lidocaine versus other local anaesthetics.

Transient neurologic symptoms (TNS) following spinal anaesthesia with lidocaine versus other local anaesthetics. BACKGROUND: Spinal anaesthesia has been in use since the turn of the late 19th century. The most serious complication of this technique is damage to the spinal cord or nerve roots resulting in lasting neurologic sequelae. Such serious adverse effects seldom happen. There has been an increase in the number of reports during the last nine years implicating lidocaine as a possible cause (...) of temporary and permanent neurologic complications after spinal anaesthesia. Follow-up of patients who received uncomplicated spinal anaesthesia revealed that some of them developed pain in the lower extremities after an initial full recovery. This painful condition that occurs in the immediate post-operative period was named "transient neurologic symptoms" (TNS). OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this review were to study the frequency of TNS and neurologic complications after spinal anaesthesia

Cochrane2003

211. Comparison of upper airway collapse during general anaesthesia and sleep.

Comparison of upper airway collapse during general anaesthesia and sleep. Measurement of the collapsibility of the upper airway while a patient is awake is not a good guide to such collapsibility during sleep, presumably because of differences in respiratory drive, muscle tone, and sensitivity of reflexes. To assess whether a relation existed between general anaesthesia and sleep, we measured collapsibility of the upper airway during general anaesthesia and severity of sleep-disordered (...) breathing in 25 people who were having minor surgery on their limbs. Anaesthetised patients who needed positive pressure to maintain airway patency had more severe sleep-disordered breathing than did those whose airways remained patent at or below atmospheric pressure. Such an association was strongest during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. Our findings suggest that sleep-disordered breathing should be considered in all patients with a pronounced tendency for upper airway obstruction during anaesthesia

Lancet2002

212. Comparison of hemodynamics, recovery profile, and early postoperative pain control and costs of remifentanil versus alfentanil-based total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA)

Comparison of hemodynamics, recovery profile, and early postoperative pain control and costs of remifentanil versus alfentanil-based total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) Comparison of hemodynamics, recovery profile, and early postoperative pain control and costs of remifentanil versus alfentanil-based total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) Comparison of hemodynamics, recovery profile, and early postoperative pain control and costs of remifentanil versus alfentanil-based total intravenous (...) anaesthesia (TIVA) Ozkose Z, Cok O Y, Tuncer B, Tufekcioglu S, Yardim S Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The use of two combinations of drugs for total intravenous anaesthesia, remifentanil plus propofol (RP) versus

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2002

213. Is intercostal block for pain management in thoracic surgery more successful than epidural anaesthesia?

Is intercostal block for pain management in thoracic surgery more successful than epidural anaesthesia? Is intercostal block for pain management in thoracic surgery more successful than epidural anaesthesia? Is intercostal block for pain management in thoracic surgery more successful than epidural anaesthesia? Wurnig P N, Lackner H, Teiner C, Hollaus P H, Pospisil M, Fohsl-Grande B, Osarowsky M, Pridun N S Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets (...) intercostal space at the end of the operation. The patients in the EPC group had a catheter placed in the epidural space at the thoracic level before the induction of general anaesthesia. All of the patients received a baseline analgesic medication with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. They also received extra subcutaneous opiate injections if required. Type of intervention Anaesthesia. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population The study population comprised patients

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2002

214. Epidural anaesthesia and analgesia and outcome of major surgery: a randomised trial.

Epidural anaesthesia and analgesia and outcome of major surgery: a randomised trial. 11965272 2002 04 19 2002 04 30 2015 06 16 0140-6736 359 9314 2002 Apr 13 Lancet (London, England) Lancet Epidural anaesthesia and analgesia and outcome of major surgery: a randomised trial. 1276-82 Epidural block is widely used to manage major abdominal surgery and postoperative analgesia, but its risks and benefits are uncertain. We compared adverse outcomes in high-risk patients managed for major surgery (...) with epidural block or alternative analgesic regimens with general anaesthesia in a multicentre randomised trial. 915 patients undergoing major abdominal surgery with one of nine defined comorbid states to identify high-risk status were randomly assigned intraoperative epidural anaesthesia and postoperative epidural analgesia for 72 h with general anaesthesia (site of epidural selected to provide optimum block) or control. The primary endpoint was death at 30 days or major postsurgical morbidity. Analysis

Lancet2002

215. Opioid antagonists under heavy sedation or anaesthesia for opioid withdrawal.

Opioid antagonists under heavy sedation or anaesthesia for opioid withdrawal. BACKGROUND: Withdrawal (detoxification) is necessary prior to drug-free treatment. It may also represent the end point of long-term opioid replacement treatment such as methadone maintenance. The availability of managed withdrawal is essential to an effective treatment system. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of interventions involving the administration of opioid antagonists to induce opioid withdrawal (...) with concomitant heavy sedation or anaesthesia. SEARCH STRATEGY: Multiple electronic databases (including MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycLIT, Australian Medical Index, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and CINAHL) were systematically searched. Reference lists of retrieved studies, reviews and conference abstracts were handsearched. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared the administration of opioid antagonists under heavy sedation or anaesthesia with another form

Cochrane2002

216. Anaesthesia for treating distal radial fracture in adults.

Anaesthesia for treating distal radial fracture in adults. BACKGROUND: Fracture of the distal radius is a common clinical problem, particularly in older white women with osteoporosis. Anaesthesia is usually provided during manipulation of displaced fractures or during surgical treatment. OBJECTIVES: To examine the evidence for the relative effectiveness of the main methods of anaesthesia (haematoma block, intravenous regional anaesthesia (IVRA), regional nerve blocks, sedation and general (...) anaesthesia) as well as associated physical techniques and drug adjuncts used during the management of distal radial fractures in adults. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Injuries Group specialised register (January 2002), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2001), MEDLINE (1966 to October 2001), EMBASE (1988 to 2001 Week 48), Current Controlled Trials (December 2001) and reference lists of articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised or quasi

Cochrane2002

217. Ward reduction without general anaesthesia versus reduction and repair under general anaesthesia for gastroschisis in newborn infants.

Ward reduction without general anaesthesia versus reduction and repair under general anaesthesia for gastroschisis in newborn infants. BACKGROUND: Gastroschisis is a congenital anterior abdominal wall defect with the abdominal contents protruding through the defect. Reduction of the abdominal contents is required within hours after birth as the infant is at risk not only of water and heat loss from the exposed bowel but also of compromised gut circulation with ischaemia and infarction. To avoid (...) the complications of general anaesthetic and mechanical ventilation it has been proposed that the reduction of abdominal contents can be achieved without endotracheal intubation or anaesthesia. OBJECTIVES: To determine which approach to the immediate surgical treatment of gastroschisis has the better outcomes: ward reduction without general anaesthetic or reduction and repair of the abdominal wall defect under general anaesthesia. SEARCH STRATEGY: Searches were made of MEDLINE from 1966 to March 2002, CINAHL

Cochrane2002

218. Comparative analysis of costs of total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol and remifentanil vs. balanced anaesthesia with isoflurane and fentanyl

Comparative analysis of costs of total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol and remifentanil vs. balanced anaesthesia with isoflurane and fentanyl Comparative analysis of costs of total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol and remifentanil vs. balanced anaesthesia with isoflurane and fentanyl Comparative analysis of costs of total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol and remifentanil vs. balanced anaesthesia with isoflurane and fentanyl Epple J, Kubitz J, Schmidt H, Motsch J, Bottiger B W (...) , Martin E, Bach A Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The use of total intravenous anaesthesia with remifentanil and propofol (TIVA-RP) before surgery. The anaesthetic regimen consisted of propofol (1.5 mg/kg

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2001

219. Patient and hospital benefits of local anaesthesia for carotid endarterectomy

Patient and hospital benefits of local anaesthesia for carotid endarterectomy Patient and hospital benefits of local anaesthesia for carotid endarterectomy Patient and hospital benefits of local anaesthesia for carotid endarterectomy McCarthy R J, Walker R, McAteer P, Budd J S, Horrocks M Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed (...) by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The use of local anaesthesia (LA) and general anaesthesia (GA) during carotid endarterectomy (CEA). The GA patients received intravenous midazolam (2 - 3 mg) at induction, then fentanyl or alfentanil and propofol, and were maintained on a mixture of isofluorane, air and oxygen. The LA patients were premedicated with temazepam (20 - 30 mg) and promethazine (25 mg). The regional block consisted

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2001

220. Pain after transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy: the advantages of periprostatic local anaesthesia

Pain after transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy: the advantages of periprostatic local anaesthesia Pain after transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy: the advantages of periprostatic local anaesthesia Pain after transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy: the advantages of periprostatic local anaesthesia Seymour H, Perry M J, Lee-Elliot C, Dundas D, Patel U Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion (...) on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The health intervention examined in the study was periprostatic local anaesthesia (LA) during prostatic biopsy guided by transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS). Type of intervention Other: anaesthesia. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population The study population

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2001