Latest & greatest articles for anaesthesia

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on anaesthesia and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Anaesthesia

Clinical Anaesthesia is used to induce a temporary medical state of controlled unconsciousness, inducing a loss of sensation or awareness. There are three main types of Anaesthesia:

  • Local and Regional
  • General
  • Sedation

Anaesthesia is primarily used during surgical procedures to block pain. While unconscious, blood flow and heart rate is monitored.

Research and development in the use of Anaesthesia has helped anesthesiologists in the progression of patient safety before and after surgery and medical procedures. The developments and research of Anaesthesia through the years has massively influences medicine and surgery today.

Case studies and clinical trials help aid researchers in the development of aftercare during postoperative recovery. Research is a vital part in the field of Anaesthesia, it allows anesthesiologists to improve the delivery of patient safety while unconscious.

Learn more on the emerging technology in Anaesthesia and the advancements in Anaesthesia practise by searching Trip.

Top results for anaesthesia

1. Maternal position in the second stage of labour for women with epidural anaesthesia.

Maternal position in the second stage of labour for women with epidural anaesthesia. BACKGROUND: Epidural analgesia in labour prolongs the second stage and increases instrumental delivery. It has been suggested that a more upright maternal position during all or part of the second stage may counteract these adverse effects. This is an update of a Cochrane Review published in 2017. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of different birthing positions (upright or recumbent) during the second stage

Cochrane2018

2. Inhaled anaesthesia with anti-sickness medication in children has the same risk of vomiting as intravenous anaesthesia

Inhaled anaesthesia with anti-sickness medication in children has the same risk of vomiting as intravenous anaesthesia Signal - Inhaled anaesthesia with anti-sickness medication in children has the same risk of vomiting as intravenous anaesthesia Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Inhaled anaesthesia with anti-sickness medication in children has the same risk of vomiting as intravenous anaesthesia Published on 27 February 2018 Post-operative vomiting is common in children (...) . One strategy is to use an intravenous anaesthetic, which is known to cause lower rates of sickness than inhaled anaesthetics. There are disadvantages to this though, such as the need for injections before a child is asleep, slowing of the heart and difficulty in monitoring depth of the anaesthetic. This review of four trials included 558 children who had an operation to correct a squint. A third of children in each anaesthetic group had post-operative vomiting. There was no difference in time

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

3. Regional anaesthesia could improve fistula function for kidney dialysis

Regional anaesthesia could improve fistula function for kidney dialysis Signal - Regional anaesthesia could improve fistula function for kidney dialysis Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Regional anaesthesia could improve fistula function for kidney dialysis Published on 25 July 2017 Use of regional anaesthesia when creating a fistula for vascular access may reduce the risk of failure by about 70%. Easy access to blood vessels is important when someone needs kidney dialysis (...) and the commonest procedure is forming of an artificial link between arteries and veins, called a fistula. Unfortunately some newly formed fistulas fail because the blood vessel is not “patent” or open wide enough to work properly. This systematic review found four randomised controlled trials of adults having surgery to make an arteriovenous fistula for kidney dialysis. The trials compared how well the fistulas worked when they had been formed using regional anaesthesia compared with those formed using local

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

4. Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery

Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery Signal - Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery Published on 27 September 2016 High quality evidence suggests that an epidural anaesthetic (with or without an opioid) promotes the return of gut function after abdominal surgery. This is when compared (...) to an opioid based regimen, given either through an epidural or into the bloodstream. Epidural anaesthetic also gave a clinically meaningful reduction in pain. Evidence for other outcomes, including reduction in vomiting, was less reliable. Poor gut function and pain in the period following abdominal surgery are common. Opioid pain-relief also carries additional risks. Improving these factors could theoretically have benefits in terms of reducing hospital stays and costs. Ultimately, decisions to use

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

5. Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours

Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours Signal - Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours Published on 15 March 2016 Neuraxial anaesthesia (...) , administered around the nerves in the spine, was found to be as safe as general anaesthesia for people undergoing total hip or knee replacements. This review found a similar risk of dying, infection, nerve damage and blood clots in people regardless of the type of anaesthesia. Hospital stay was reduced on average by 0.4 days in the neuraxial anaesthesia group, though the significance to patients or impact on costs was not explored. Using neuraxial anaesthesia took no longer to perform than general

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

6. APA Consensus Statement on updated fluid fasting guidelines for children prior to elective general anaesthesia

APA Consensus Statement on updated fluid fasting guidelines for children prior to elective general anaesthesia ‘We the undersigned representatives of our respective national societies agree that, based on the current convincing evidence base, unless there is a clear contra-indication, it is safe and recommended for all children able to take clear fluids*, to be allowed and encouraged to have them up to one hour before elective general anaesthesia’ Charles Stack, President, Association

Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland2018

7. Perioperative local anaesthesia for reducing pain following septal surgery.

Perioperative local anaesthesia for reducing pain following septal surgery. BACKGROUND: Septal surgery is a well-established procedure used to treat nasal obstruction due to deviation of the nasal septum, which is carried out under local or general anaesthesia. Local anaesthesia is used for postoperative pain control, but its effectiveness and safety are unclear. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of perioperative local anaesthesia for reducing pain in septal surgery and to evaluate (...) surgery. We included studies comparing local anaesthesia versus no treatment/placebo. We also included studies comparing different types of local anaesthesia to each other (i.e. local injection, the addition of an anaesthetic agent to nasal packing, where used, and sphenopalatine ganglion block). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary outcome was postoperative pain intensity at 12, 24 and 48 hours measured by visual analogue scale

Cochrane2018

8. Intravenous versus inhalational maintenance of anaesthesia for postoperative cognitive outcomes in elderly people undergoing non-cardiac surgery.

Intravenous versus inhalational maintenance of anaesthesia for postoperative cognitive outcomes in elderly people undergoing non-cardiac surgery. BACKGROUND: The use of anaesthetics in the elderly surgical population (more than 60 years of age) is increasing. Postoperative delirium, an acute condition characterized by reduced awareness of the environment and a disturbance in attention, typically occurs between 24 and 72 hours after surgery and can affect up to 60% of elderly surgical patients (...) . Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a new-onset of cognitive impairment which may persist for weeks or months after surgery.Traditionally, surgical anaesthesia has been maintained with inhalational agents. End-tidal concentrations require adjustment to balance the risks of accidental awareness and excessive dosing in elderly people. As an alternative, propofol-based total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) offers a more rapid recovery and reduces postoperative nausea and vomiting. Using TIVA

Cochrane2018

9. Anaesthesia

Anaesthesia Top results for anaesthesia - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature My query is: English Français Deutsch Čeština Español Magyar Svenska ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing (...) the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for anaesthesia The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines

Trip Latest and Greatest2018

10. Injectable local anaesthetic agents for dental anaesthesia.

Injectable local anaesthetic agents for dental anaesthesia. BACKGROUND: Pain during dental treatment, which is a common fear of patients, can be controlled successfully by local anaesthetic. Several different local anaesthetic formulations and techniques are available to dentists. OBJECTIVES: Our primary objectives were to compare the success of anaesthesia, the speed of onset and duration of anaesthesia, and systemic and local adverse effects amongst different local anaesthetic formulations (...) for dental anaesthesia. We define success of anaesthesia as absence of pain during a dental procedure, or a negative response to electric pulp testing or other simulated scenario tests. We define dental anaesthesia as anaesthesia given at the time of any dental intervention.Our secondary objective was to report on patients' experience of the procedures carried out. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; the Cochrane Library; 2018, Issue 1), MEDLINE (OVID

Cochrane2018

11. Local anaesthetics and regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia for preventing persistent postoperative pain in adults and children.

Local anaesthetics and regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia for preventing persistent postoperative pain in adults and children. BACKGROUND: Regional anaesthesia may reduce the rate of persistent postoperative pain (PPP), a frequent and debilitating condition. This review was originally published in 2012 and updated in 2017. OBJECTIVES: To compare local anaesthetics and regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia for the prevention of PPP beyond three months in adults (...) the PROSPERO systematic review registry for related systematic reviews. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included RCTs comparing local or regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia with a pain outcome beyond three months after elective, non-orthopaedic surgery. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: At least two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data and adverse events. We contacted study authors for additional information. We presented outcomes as pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95

Cochrane2018

12. Use of platelet transfusions prior to lumbar punctures or epidural anaesthesia for the prevention of complications in people with thrombocytopenia.

Use of platelet transfusions prior to lumbar punctures or epidural anaesthesia for the prevention of complications in people with thrombocytopenia. BACKGROUND: People with a low platelet count (thrombocytopenia) often require lumbar punctures or an epidural anaesthetic. Lumbar punctures can be diagnostic (haematological malignancies, subarachnoid haematoma, meningitis) or therapeutic (spinal anaesthetic, administration of chemotherapy). Epidural catheters are placed for administration (...) of epidural anaesthetic. Current practice in many countries is to correct thrombocytopenia with platelet transfusions prior to lumbar punctures and epidural anaesthesia, in order to mitigate the risk of serious procedure-related bleeding. However, the platelet count threshold recommended prior to these procedures varies significantly from country to country. This indicates significant uncertainty among clinicians regarding the correct management of these patients. The risk of bleeding appears to be low

Cochrane2018

13. Local anaesthetics and regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia for preventing persistent postoperative pain in adults and children.

Local anaesthetics and regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia for preventing persistent postoperative pain in adults and children. BACKGROUND: Regional anaesthesia may reduce the rate of persistent postoperative pain (PPP), a frequent and debilitating condition. This review was originally published in 2012 and updated in 2017. OBJECTIVES: To compare local anaesthetics and regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia for the prevention of PPP beyond three months in adults (...) the PROSPERO systematic review registry for related systematic reviews. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included RCTs comparing local or regional anaesthesia versus conventional analgesia with a pain outcome beyond three months after elective, non-orthopaedic surgery. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: At least two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data and adverse events. We contacted study authors for additional information. We presented outcomes as pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95

Cochrane2018

14. Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery

Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery NIHR DC | Signal - Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Epidural anaesthesia helps return of bowel function after abdominal surgery Published on 27 September 2016 High quality evidence suggests that an epidural anaesthetic (with or without an opioid) promotes the return of gut function after abdominal surgery (...) . This is when compared to an opioid based regimen, given either through an epidural or into the bloodstream. Epidural anaesthetic also gave a clinically meaningful reduction in pain. Evidence for other outcomes, including reduction in vomiting, was less reliable. Poor gut function and pain in the period following abdominal surgery are common. Opioid pain-relief also carries additional risks. Improving these factors could theoretically have benefits in terms of reducing hospital stays and costs. Ultimately

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

15. Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours

Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours NIHR DC | Signal - Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Two types of anaesthesia are safe for hip and knee replacements but one may reduce the time spent in hospital by a few hours Published on 15 March 2016 Neuraxial (...) anaesthesia, administered around the nerves in the spine, was found to be as safe as general anaesthesia for people undergoing total hip or knee replacements. This review found a similar risk of dying, infection, nerve damage and blood clots in people regardless of the type of anaesthesia. Hospital stay was reduced on average by 0.4 days in the neuraxial anaesthesia group, though the significance to patients or impact on costs was not explored. Using neuraxial anaesthesia took no longer to perform than

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

16. Inhaled anaesthesia with anti-sickness medication in children has the same risk of vomiting as intravenous anaesthesia

Inhaled anaesthesia with anti-sickness medication in children has the same risk of vomiting as intravenous anaesthesia NIHR DC | Signal - Inhaled anaesthesia with anti-sickness medication in children has the same risk of vomiting as intravenous anaesthesia Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover Inhaled anaesthesia with anti-sickness medication in children has the same risk of vomiting as intravenous anaesthesia Published on 27 February 2018 Post-operative vomiting is common (...) in children. One strategy is to use an intravenous anaesthetic, which is known to cause lower rates of sickness than inhaled anaesthetics. There are disadvantages to this though, such as the need for injections before a child is asleep, slowing of the heart and difficulty in monitoring depth of the anaesthetic. This review of four trials included 558 children who had an operation to correct a squint. A third of children in each anaesthetic group had post-operative vomiting. There was no difference in time

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

17. Regional anaesthesia could improve fistula function for kidney dialysis

Regional anaesthesia could improve fistula function for kidney dialysis NIHR DC | Signal - Regional anaesthesia could improve fistula function for kidney dialysis Dissemination Centre Discover Portal NIHR DC Discover NIHR Signal Regional anaesthesia could improve fistula function for kidney dialysis Published on 25 July 2017 Use of regional anaesthesia when creating a fistula for vascular access may reduce the risk of failure by about 70%. Easy access to blood vessels is important when someone (...) needs kidney dialysis and the commonest procedure is forming of an artificial link between arteries and veins, called a fistula. Unfortunately some newly formed fistulas fail because the blood vessel is not “patent” or open wide enough to work properly. This systematic review found four randomised controlled trials of adults having surgery to make an arteriovenous fistula for kidney dialysis. The trials compared how well the fistulas worked when they had been formed using regional anaesthesia

NIHR Dissemination Centre2018

18. General versus spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section: a quasi-controlled trial.

General versus spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section: a quasi-controlled trial. BACKGROUND: General anaesthesia and spinal anaesthesia are commonly used for caesarean sections. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes from caesarean sections with these two types of anaesthesia. METHODS: In this quasi-controlled trial, we enrolled women undergoing caesarean sections at Al-Helal Al-Emirati Hospital, Rafah, Gaza Strip. Women were assigned either to general anaesthesia (20% intravenous (...) propofol for anaesthesia induction followed by atracurium for muscle relaxation, and nitrous oxide and oxygen for anaesthesia maintenance) or to spinal anaesthesia (0·5% hyperbaric solution bupivacaine with 20 μg fentanyl intrathecally). Outcome measures were length of hospital stay, length of operation, postoperative pain assessment by visual analogue scales (VAS; range 0-10, where 0 is no pain and 10 is very bad pain) 1 hour after the operation, time from anaesthesia to demand for analgesia, amount

Lancet2018

19. Carbetocin (Pabal) - For the prevention of uterine atony following delivery of the infant by Caesarean section under epidural or spinal anaesthesia

Carbetocin (Pabal) - For the prevention of uterine atony following delivery of the infant by Caesarean section under epidural or spinal anaesthesia

Scottish Medicines Consortium2018

20. Randomized clinical trial of immersive virtual reality tour of the operating theatre in children before anaesthesia

Randomized clinical trial of immersive virtual reality tour of the operating theatre in children before anaesthesia 28975600 2017 10 25 2017 10 25 1365-2168 104 12 2017 Nov The British journal of surgery Br J Surg Randomized clinical trial of immersive virtual reality tour of the operating theatre in children before anaesthesia. 1628-1633 10.1002/bjs.10684 A virtual reality (VR) tour of the operating theatre before anaesthesia could provide a realistic experience for children. This study (...) was designed to determine whether a preoperative VR tour could reduce preoperative anxiety in children. Children scheduled for elective surgery under general anaesthesia were randomized into a control or VR group. The control group received conventional information regarding anaesthesia and surgery. The VR group watched a 4-min video showing Pororo, the famous little penguin, visiting the operating theatre and explaining what is in it. The main outcome was preoperative anxiety, assessed using the modified

EvidenceUpdates2017