Latest & greatest articles for amitriptyline

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Top results for amitriptyline

21. Amitriptyline for depression.

Amitriptyline for depression. BACKGROUND: For many years amitriptyline has been considered one of the reference compounds for the pharmacological treatment of depression. However, new tricyclic drugs, heterocyclic compounds and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been introduced on the market with the claim of a more favourable tolerability/efficacy profile. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present systematic review was to investigate the tolerability and efficacy of amitriptyline (...) amitriptyline with another tricyclic/heterocyclic antidepressant or with one of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Data were extracted using a standardised form. The number of patients undergoing the randomisation procedure, the number of patients who completed the study and the number of improved patients were extracted. In addition, group mean scores at the end of the trial on Hamilton Depression Scale or any other depression scale were extracted

Cochrane2007

22. Amitriptyline for inpatients and SSRIs for outpatients with depression: systematic review and meta-regression analysis

Amitriptyline for inpatients and SSRIs for outpatients with depression: systematic review and meta-regression analysis Amitriptyline for inpatients and SSRIs for outpatients with depression: systematic review and meta-regression analysis Amitriptyline for inpatients and SSRIs for outpatients with depression: systematic review and meta-regression analysis Barbui C, Guaiana G, Hotopf M CRD summary This review examined the influence of study setting on the effect of amitriptyline compared (...) with other antidepressants. The authors concluded that it may be reasonable to use newer antidepressants as first-line treatment in out-patients with depression, and to use amitriptyline for in-patients with severe depression. Differences among the studies were not examined adequately, thus the conclusions may not be reliable. Authors' objectives To examine the effect of study setting (in-patient versus out-patient) on outcomes in clinical trials comparing amitriptyline with other antidepressants (ADs

DARE.2004

23. Economic impact of using mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in the UK

Economic impact of using mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in the UK Economic impact of using mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in the UK Economic impact of using mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in the UK Borghi J, Guest J F Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic (...) evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in the UK. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Patients in the UK

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.2000

24. Cost-effectiveness of mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in Austria

Cost-effectiveness of mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in Austria Cost-effectiveness of mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in Austria Cost-effectiveness of mirtazapine compared to amitriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in Austria Brown M C J, Nimmerrichter A A, Guest J F Record Status This is a critical abstract (...) of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The use of mirtazapine, amitriptyline, and fluoxetine in the treatment of moderate and severe depression in Austria. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Austrian people

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.1999

25. Acupuncture and amitriptyline for pain due to HIV-related peripheral neuropathy: a randomized controlled trial. Terry Beirn Community Programs for Clinical Research on AIDS.

Acupuncture and amitriptyline for pain due to HIV-related peripheral neuropathy: a randomized controlled trial. Terry Beirn Community Programs for Clinical Research on AIDS. 9820261 1998 11 25 1998 11 25 2016 10 17 0098-7484 280 18 1998 Nov 11 JAMA JAMA Acupuncture and amitriptyline for pain due to HIV-related peripheral neuropathy: a randomized controlled trial. Terry Beirn Community Programs for Clinical Research on AIDS. 1590-5 Peripheral neuropathy is common in persons infected (...) with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) but few data on symptomatic treatment are available. To evaluate the efficacy of a standardized acupuncture regimen (SAR) and amitriptyline hydrochloride for the relief of pain due to HIV-related peripheral neuropathy in HIV-infected patients. Randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial. Each site enrolled patients into 1 of the following 3 options: (1) a modified double-blind 2 x 2 factorial design of SAR, amitriptyline, or the combination compared with placebo, (2

JAMA1998

26. Randomised controlled trial comparing problem solving treatment with amitriptyline and placebo for major depression in primary care.

Randomised controlled trial comparing problem solving treatment with amitriptyline and placebo for major depression in primary care. 7873952 1995 04 05 1995 04 05 2016 10 19 0959-8138 310 6977 1995 Feb 18 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Randomised controlled trial comparing problem solving treatment with amitriptyline and placebo for major depression in primary care. 441-5 To determine whether, in the treatment of major depression in primary care, a brief psychological treatment (problem (...) solving) was (a) as effective as antidepressant drugs and more effective than placebo; (b) feasible in practice; and (c) acceptable to patients. Randomised controlled trial of problem solving treatment, amitriptyline plus standard clinical management, and drug placebo plus standard clinical management. Each treatment was delivered in six sessions over 12 weeks. Primary care in Oxfordshire. 91 patients in primary care who had major depression. Observer and self reported measures of severity

BMJ1995 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

27. Effects of desipramine, amitriptyline, and fluoxetine on pain in diabetic neuropathy.

Effects of desipramine, amitriptyline, and fluoxetine on pain in diabetic neuropathy. 1560801 1992 05 08 1992 05 08 2013 11 21 0028-4793 326 19 1992 May 07 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Effects of desipramine, amitriptyline, and fluoxetine on pain in diabetic neuropathy. 1250-6 Amitriptyline reduces the pain caused by peripheral-nerve disease, but treatment is often limited by side effects related to the drug's many pharmacologic actions. Selective agents might be safer (...) and more effective. We carried out two randomized, double-blind, crossover studies in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy, comparing amitriptyline with the relatively selective blocker of norepinephrine reuptake desipramine in 38 patients, and comparing the selective blocker of serotonin reuptake fluoxetine with placebo in 46 patients. Fifty-seven patients were randomly assigned to a study as well as to the order of treatment, permitting comparison among all three drugs and placebo as the first

NEJM1992

28. A trial of amitriptyline and fluphenazine in the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy.

A trial of amitriptyline and fluphenazine in the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. 3511312 1986 02 28 1986 02 28 2016 10 17 0098-7484 255 5 1986 Feb 07 JAMA JAMA A trial of amitriptyline and fluphenazine in the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. 637-9 We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of the effectiveness of amitriptyline and fluphenazine in alleviating the pain of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in six diabetic patients. Pain was evaluated (...) by the patients with a graphic rating scale. A placebo response was found, but no additional effect of amitriptyline and fluphenazine was seen. Although the statistical power of this study was low, these data, when combined with a reevaluation of previous trials of amitriptyline and fluphenazine in the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy, indicate that there is no justification for the use of these agents in the treatment of painful neuropathy outside of large, controlled clinical trials. Depression

JAMA1986