Latest & greatest articles for albuterol

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Top results for albuterol

21. The Use of Albuterol in Hospitalized Infants With Bronchiolitis

The Use of Albuterol in Hospitalized Infants With Bronchiolitis PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club1998

22. Comparison of regularly scheduled with as-needed use of albuterol in mild asthma. Asthma Clinical Research Network.

Comparison of regularly scheduled with as-needed use of albuterol in mild asthma. Asthma Clinical Research Network. 8778601 1996 09 19 1996 09 19 2013 11 21 0028-4793 335 12 1996 Sep 19 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Comparison of regularly scheduled with as-needed use of albuterol in mild asthma. Asthma Clinical Research Network. 841-7 Inhaled beta-agonists are the most commonly used treatment for asthma, but data suggest that regularly scheduled use of these agents may (...) have deleterious effect on the control of asthma. We compared the effects of regularly scheduled use of inhaled albuterol with those of albuterol used only as needed in patients with mild chronic, stable asthma. In a multicenter, double-blind study, we randomly assigned 255 patients with mild asthma to inhale albuterol either on a regular schedule (126 patients) or only as needed (129 patients). The patients were followed for 16 weeks. The primary outcome indicator, peak expiratory air flow

NEJM1996

23. Salmeterol xinafoate as maintenance therapy compared with albuterol in patients with asthma.

Salmeterol xinafoate as maintenance therapy compared with albuterol in patients with asthma. 7909853 1994 06 06 1994 06 06 2016 10 17 0098-7484 271 18 1994 May 11 JAMA JAMA Salmeterol xinafoate as maintenance therapy compared with albuterol in patients with asthma. 1412-6 To compare the efficacy and safety of inhaled salmeterol xinafoate, a long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist, with that of albuterol, a short-acting inhaled beta 2-agonist, in the treatment of asthma. Randomized, double-blind (...) , placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. Eleven outpatient clinical centers. A total of 322 male and female patients at least 12 years of age with chronic symptomatic asthma requiring daily therapy. Patients were treated with salmeterol xinafoate (42 micrograms inhaled twice daily), albuterol (180 micrograms inhaled four times daily), or placebo (four times a day) for 12 weeks; patients in all three groups could use inhaled albuterol as backup medication for breakthrough symptoms. Serial 12-hour

JAMA1994

24. A comparison of salmeterol with albuterol in the treatment of mild-to-moderate asthma.

A comparison of salmeterol with albuterol in the treatment of mild-to-moderate asthma. 1357554 1992 11 23 1992 11 23 2015 11 19 0028-4793 327 20 1992 Nov 12 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. A comparison of salmeterol with albuterol in the treatment of mild-to-moderate asthma. 1420-5 An effective, long-acting bronchodilator could benefit patients with asthma who have symptoms not controlled by antiinflammatory drugs. We compared a new long-acting, inhaled beta 2-adrenoceptor (...) agonist, salmeterol, with a short-acting beta 2-agonist, albuterol, in the treatment of mild-to-moderate asthma. We randomly assigned 234 patients (150 male and 84 female patients 12 to 73 years old) to one of three treatment groups: one group received 42 micrograms of salmeterol twice daily, one received 180 micrograms of albuterol four times daily, and one received placebo. Treatment was assigned in a double-blind fashion, and all patients could use supplemental inhaled albuterol as needed during

NEJM1992

25. Effects of albuterol (salbutamol) on esophageal motility and gastroesophageal reflux in healthy volunteers.

Effects of albuterol (salbutamol) on esophageal motility and gastroesophageal reflux in healthy volunteers. 3184393 1988 12 20 1988 12 20 2016 10 17 0098-7484 260 21 1988 Dec 02 JAMA JAMA Effects of albuterol (salbutamol) on esophageal motility and gastroesophageal reflux in healthy volunteers. 3156-8 Orally or intravenously administered beta 2-adrenergic drugs have been found to inhibit esophageal motor function. Since inhalation of these drugs results in less systemic side effects (...) , the present double-blind study was designed to investigate the influence of inhalation of the beta 2-adrenergic agonist albuterol (salbutamol) on esophageal motor function and gastroesophageal reflux in ten healthy volunteers. Esophageal motor function was recorded using a pneumohydraulically perfused multilumen manometry tube. Twenty-four-hour pH profiles were measured while the volunteers were ambulatory using a combined glass electrode connected to a portable recorder. Inhalation decreased neither

JAMA1988