Latest & greatest articles for acute pain

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Top results for acute pain

21. Intranasal Sufentanil for Acute Pain: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

Intranasal Sufentanil for Acute Pain: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Intranasal Sufentanil for Acute Pain: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Intranasal Sufentanil for Acute Pain: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Intranasal Sufentanil for Acute Pain: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Published on: December 6, 2017 Project Number: RB1167-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type: Report Question (...) What is the clinical effectiveness of intranasal sufentanil for acute pain in adults? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of intranasal opioids for acute pain in adults? Key Message Three evidence-based guidelines were identified regarding the use of intranasal opioids for acute pain in adults. Tags anesthesia, administration, intranasal, analgesics, opioid, drug delivery systems, fentanyl, ketamine, sufentanil, ear, nose, and throat, nasal delivery, transmucosal, Opioid

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review2017

22. A randomized, Phase IIb study investigating oliceridine (TRV130), a novel micro-receptor G-protein pathway selective (mu-GPS) modulator, for the management of moderate to severe acute pain following abdominoplasty

A randomized, Phase IIb study investigating oliceridine (TRV130), a novel micro-receptor G-protein pathway selective (mu-GPS) modulator, for the management of moderate to severe acute pain following abdominoplasty 29062240 2017 12 19 1178-7090 10 2017 Journal of pain research J Pain Res A randomized, Phase IIb study investigating oliceridine (TRV130), a novel µ-receptor G-protein pathway selective (μ-GPS) modulator, for the management of moderate to severe acute pain following abdominoplasty (...) Clin North Am. 2015 Apr;95(2):301-18 25814108 TRV130 acute pain analgesic biased ligand opioid Disclosure This study was supported by Trevena, Inc (King of Prussia, PA, USA). Neil Singla is an employee of Lotus Clinical Research, LLC, contracted by the sponsor to conduct the study; Dr Singla has also received consulting fees from Trevena, Inc. Harold S Minkowitz has received investigator fees and consulting fees from Trevena, Inc, AcelRx, and The Medicines Company. Ruth Ann Subach was an employee

EvidenceUpdates2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

23. Effect of a Single Dose of Oral Opioid and Nonopioid Analgesics on Acute Extremity Pain in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Effect of a Single Dose of Oral Opioid and Nonopioid Analgesics on Acute Extremity Pain in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Importance: The choice of analgesic to treat acute pain in the emergency department (ED) lacks a clear evidence base. The combination of ibuprofen and acetaminophen (paracetamol) may represent a viable nonopioid alternative. Objectives: To compare the efficacy of 4 oral analgesics. Design, Settings, and Participants: Randomized clinical trial (...) conducted at 2 urban EDs in the Bronx, New York, that included 416 patients aged 21 to 64 years with moderate to severe acute extremity pain enrolled from July 2015 to August 2016. Interventions: Participants (104 per each combination analgesic group) received 400 mg of ibuprofen and 1000 mg of acetaminophen; 5 mg of oxycodone and 325 mg of acetaminophen; 5 mg of hydrocodone and 300 mg of acetaminophen; or 30 mg of codeine and 300 mg of acetaminophen. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome

JAMA2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

24. Acute Pain

Acute Pain Acute Pain | ONS Search the ONS website Pain Acute Pain PEP Topics Acute Pain Acute pain is typically related to diagnostic procedures and cancer treatment and is generally defined as lasting no longer than three months. The most common types of are postoperative pain and the pain of oral mucositis. The acute pain of some patients with cancer may be caused by arthralgia or myalgia, which can be side effects of some chemotherapy drugs and biologic therapy. Click for instructions

Oncology Nursing Society Putting Evidence into Practice (PEP)2017

25. In patients with localized acute soft tissue or musculoskeletal pain, does topical lidocaine provide better temporary pain relief than topical NSAIDs?

In patients with localized acute soft tissue or musculoskeletal pain, does topical lidocaine provide better temporary pain relief than topical NSAIDs? In patients with localized acute soft tissue or musculoskeletal pain, does topical lidocaine provide better temporary pain relief than topical NSAIDs? Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace (...) This Collection Browse Statistics In patients with localized acute soft tissue or musculoskeletal pain, does topical lidocaine provide better temporary pain relief than topical NSAIDs? View/ Open Date 2017-06 Format Metadata Abstract In patients with localized acute soft tissue or musculoskeletal pain, does topical lidocaine provide better temporary pain relief than topical NSAIDs? Evidence-based answer: The answer is unknown, but both topical agents appear effective. Topical NSAIDs provide a 50% reduction

Evidence Based Practice 2017

26. Sufentanil citrate (Zalviso) - Management of acute moderate to severe post-operative pain in adult patients

Sufentanil citrate (Zalviso) - Management of acute moderate to severe post-operative pain in adult patients Published 07 August 2017 Statement of Advice: In Confidence sufentanil citrate 15 micrograms sublingual tablets (Zalviso ® ) (No: 1270/17) Grunenthal Ltd 07 July 2017 ADVICE: in the absence of a submission from the holder of the marketing authorisation sufentanil citrate (Zalviso ® ) is not recommended for use within NHS Scotland. Indication under review: Management of acute moderate (...) to severe post-operative pain in adult patients. The holder of the marketing authorisation has not made a submission to SMC regarding this product in this indication. As a result we cannot recommend its use within NHSScotland. Advice context: No part of this advice may be used without the whole of the advice being quoted in full. This advice represents the view of the Scottish Medicines Consortium. It is provided to inform the considerations of Area Drug & Therapeutics Committees and NHS Boards

Scottish Medicines Consortium2017

27. Randomized Controlled Trial of Brief Mindfulness Training and Hypnotic Suggestion for Acute Pain Relief in the Hospital Setting

Randomized Controlled Trial of Brief Mindfulness Training and Hypnotic Suggestion for Acute Pain Relief in the Hospital Setting 28702870 2017 07 13 2017 07 13 1525-1497 2017 Jul 12 Journal of general internal medicine J Gen Intern Med Randomized Controlled Trial of Brief Mindfulness Training and Hypnotic Suggestion for Acute Pain Relief in the Hospital Setting. 10.1007/s11606-017-4116-9 Medical management of acute pain among hospital inpatients may be enhanced by mind-body interventions. We (...) hypothesized that a single, scripted session of mindfulness training focused on acceptance of pain or hypnotic suggestion focused on changing pain sensations through imagery would significantly reduce acute pain intensity and unpleasantness compared to a psychoeducation pain coping control. We also hypothesized that mindfulness and suggestion would produce significant improvements in secondary outcomes including relaxation, pleasant body sensations, anxiety, and desire for opioids, compared to the control

EvidenceUpdates2017

28. Comparative Effectiveness of Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Treating Acute Pain in the Emergency Department

Comparative Effectiveness of Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Treating Acute Pain in the Emergency Department 28601270 2017 06 11 2017 06 11 1097-6760 2017 Jun 07 Annals of emergency medicine Ann Emerg Med Comparative Effectiveness of Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Treating Acute Pain in the Emergency Department. S0196-0644(17)30360-8 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2017.03.064 We assess the effectiveness of patient-controlled analgesia in the emergency department (ED). We hypothesized that decline (...) in pain intensity from 30 to 120 minutes after initial intravenous opioid administration is greater in patients receiving morphine by patient-controlled analgesia compared with usual care and would differ by a clinically significant amount. This was a pragmatic randomized controlled trial of patient-controlled analgesia and usual care (opioid and dose at physician's discretion) in 4 EDs. Entry criteria included age 18 to 65 years and acute pain requiring intravenous opioids. The primary outcome

EvidenceUpdates2017

29. Fluid replacement therapy for acute episodes of pain in people with sickle cell disease.

Fluid replacement therapy for acute episodes of pain in people with sickle cell disease. BACKGROUND: Treating vaso-occlusive painful crises in people with sickle cell disease is complex and requires multiple interventions. Extra fluids are routinely given as adjunct treatment, regardless of the individual's state of hydration with the aim of slowing or stopping the sickling process and thereby alleviating pain. This is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review. OBJECTIVES (...) : To determine the optimal route, quantity and type of fluid replacement for people with sickle cell disease with acute painful crises. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.We also conducted searches of Embase (November 2007), LILACS, www.ClinicalTrials.gov (05 January 2010

Cochrane2017

30. Does This Patient With Chest Pain Have Acute Coronary Syndrome?

Does This Patient With Chest Pain Have Acute Coronary Syndrome? DEFINE_ME_WA This site requires Cookies to be enabled to function. Please ensure Cookies are turned on and then re-visit the desired page.

Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots2017

31. Topical analgesics for acute and chronic pain in adults - an overview of Cochrane Reviews.

Topical analgesics for acute and chronic pain in adults - an overview of Cochrane Reviews. BACKGROUND: Topical analgesic drugs are used for a variety of painful conditions. Some are acute, typically strains or sprains, tendinopathy, or muscle aches. Others are chronic, typically osteoarthritis of hand or knee, or neuropathic pain. OBJECTIVES: To provide an overview of the analgesic efficacy and associated adverse events of topical analgesics (primarily nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (...) (NSAIDs), salicylate rubefacients, capsaicin, and lidocaine) applied to intact skin for the treatment of acute and chronic pain in adults. METHODS: We identified systematic reviews in acute and chronic pain published to February 2017 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (the Cochrane Library). The primary outcome was at least 50% pain relief (participant-reported) at an appropriate duration. We extracted the number needed to treat for one additional beneficial outcome (NNT) for efficacy

Cochrane2017

32. Effectiveness and Harms of Spinal Manipulative Therapy for the Treatment of Acute Neck and Lower Back Pain

Effectiveness and Harms of Spinal Manipulative Therapy for the Treatment of Acute Neck and Lower Back Pain 4 Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research & Development Service Evidence-based Synthesis Program The Effectiveness and Harms of Spinal Manipulative Therapy for the Treatment of Acute Neck and Lower Back Pain: A Systematic Review April 2017 Prepared for: Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Health Administration Quality Enhancement Research Initiative Health Services (...) for the Treatment of Acute Neck and Lower Back Pain i PREFACE Quality Enhancement Research Initiative’s (QUERI) Evidence-based Synthesis Program (ESP) was established to provide timely and accurate syntheses of targeted healthcare topics of particular importance to Veterans Affairs (VA) clinicians, managers and policymakers as they work to improve the health and healthcare of Veterans. The ESP disseminates these reports throughout the VA, and some evidence syntheses inform the clinical guidelines of large

Veterans Affairs Evidence-based Synthesis Program Reports2017

33. Antibiotics Do Not Lower Pain or Infection with Acute Apical Abscess

Antibiotics Do Not Lower Pain or Infection with Acute Apical Abscess UTCAT3216, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Antibiotics Do Not Lower Pain or Infection with Acute Apical Abscess Clinical Question In adults receiving emergency treatment for their periapical abscess, will antibiotic supplement to pulpectomy treatment with irrigation and drainage of their abscess be more beneficial in reducing (...) the patient's pain compared to treatment without antibiotics? Clinical Bottom Line Pain with acute apical abscess of permanent dentition is managed well by pulpectomy with irrigation and drainage. The addition of antibiotic therapy does not improve the patient's relief from pain or infection. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Matthews/2003 35 relevant citations including 8

UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library2017

35. Viscosupplementation of the knee: Three cases of acute Pseudoseptic Arthritis with painful and irritating complications and a literature review

Viscosupplementation of the knee: Three cases of acute Pseudoseptic Arthritis with painful and irritating complications and a literature review 28293455 2018 11 13 2147-9720 4 1 2017 Mar European journal of rheumatology Eur J Rheumatol Viscosupplementation of the knee: Three cases of acute Pseudoseptic Arthritis with painful and irritating complications and a literature review. 59-62 10.5152/eurjrheum.2016.15075 Acute pseudoseptic arthritis is a very rare complication that is associated (...) with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections, which normally involve minimal risk. The most common adverse events that are caused by hyaluronic acid injections are inflammatory reactions or flares at the injection site. In this study, we described three cases of acute pseudoseptic arthritis that was caused by hyaluronic acid; the symptoms in these cases were reminiscent of acute septic arthritis. Moreover, we performed a literature review on pseudoseptic arthritis following hyaluronic acid injections

European journal of rheumatology2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

36. Noninvasive Treatments for Acute, Subacute, and Chronic Low Back Pain: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians.

Noninvasive Treatments for Acute, Subacute, and Chronic Low Back Pain: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians. Description: The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on noninvasive treatment of low back pain. Methods: Using the ACP grading system, the committee based these recommendations on a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews published (...) Audience and Patient Population: The target audience for this guideline includes all clinicians, and the target patient population includes adults with acute, subacute, or chronic low back pain. Recommendation 1: Given that most patients with acute or subacute low back pain improve over time regardless of treatment, clinicians and patients should select nonpharmacologic treatment with superficial heat (moderate-quality evidence), massage, acupuncture, or spinal manipulation (low-quality evidence

Annals of Internal Medicine2017 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

37. Low-dose Ketamine for Acute Pain in the Emergency Department

Low-dose Ketamine for Acute Pain in the Emergency Department BestBets: Low-dose Ketamine for Acute Pain in the Emergency Department Low-dose Ketamine for Acute Pain in the Emergency Department Report By: Colby Duncan MD - Senior EM Resident Search checked by Brad Riley MD - EM Faculty Institution: Grand Rapids Medical Education Research Partners/Michigan State University Date Submitted: 15th July 2016 Date Completed: 11th February 2017 Last Modified: 11th February 2017 Status: Green (complete (...) ) Three Part Question [In ED patients with acute pain who do not respond to conventional therapies], is the [low-dose ketamine better than morphine] at [safely and effectively reducing pain scores]? Clinical Scenario A man aged 25 years presents to the ED with a closed fracture of the right humeral head. He has severe pain around the shoulder and is allergic to opioids. He is given intravenous ketorolac and midazolam. Unfortunately, the patient's pain does not improve. A colleague recommends the use

BestBETS2017

38. Ketamine Analgesia for Acute Pain in the Emergency Department

Ketamine Analgesia for Acute Pain in the Emergency Department Emergency Medicine > Journal Club > Archive > April 2016 Toggle navigation April 2016 Ketamine Analgesia for Acute Pain in the Emergency Department Vignette It's two o'clock in the afternoon during a typical weekend TCC shift, when you get a page that a triage patient is coming to room 4. You look at the chart and see that it's a 45-year-old man who was riding his horse and got bucked off, landing on his left arm in an awkward (...) , especially one that's less familiar to him. Curious about what the evidence actually shows, and wanting to be prepared to look smart in front of your pompous attending, you decide to search the literature and see what the evidence actually shows... PICO Question Population: Adult patients in the ED with acute pain Intervention: IV ketamine Comparison: Usual care with IV opiate analgesia Outcome: Pain control, adverse events (hypoxia, respiratory depression, dysphoria, etc.) patient satisfaction, ED

Washington University Emergency Medicine Journal Club2017

39. Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness

Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Topical NSAIDs versus Opioids for Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Published on: January 30, 2017 Project Number: RC0844 (...) -000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the comparative clinical effectiveness of topical NSAIDs versus opioids for the treatment of acute musculoskeletal pain? Key Message Compared with placebo, topical NSAIDs were effective in reducing pain from acute musculoskeletal conditions, such as sprains, strains or sport injuries. Adverse events were rare and were usually related to skin reactions. No evidence regarding

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review2017

40. Pregabalin for Acute Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness

Pregabalin for Acute Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Pregabalin for Acute Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Pregabalin for Acute Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Pregabalin for Acute Pain: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness Published on: January 24, 2017 Project Number: RC0843-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the clinical (...) effectiveness of pregabalin for acute pain? What is the comparative effectiveness of concurrent pregabalin and opioid use versus opioids alone for the management of acute or post-operative pain? Key Message One randomized controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated that compared to opioids alone, a single pre-operative dose of pregabalin in combination with post-operative opioids significantly reduced post-operative opioid consumption, pain scores and use of breakthrough analgesia at 48 hours. A second RCT

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review2017