Latest & greatest articles for acute pain

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on acute pain or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on acute pain and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for acute pain

301. Bed rest for acute low back pain and sciatica.

Bed rest for acute low back pain and sciatica. BACKGROUND: Low back pain is a common reason for consulting a general practitioner, and advice on daily activities constitutes an important part in the primary care management of low back pain. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of bed rest for patients with acute low back pain or sciatica. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group trial register, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, Embase, Sport, Scisearch (...) , and reference lists of relevant articles. We also contacted authors of relevant articles. Date of the most recent searches: December 1998. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included all randomised studies or quasi randomised studies where at least one comparison group of adult patients with acute low back pain with or without radiation of pain below the knee was advised to rest in bed for at least two days and one group was not, or where comparison groups were advised to stay in bed for different lengths of time

Cochrane2000

302. Anticonvulsant drugs for acute and chronic pain.

Anticonvulsant drugs for acute and chronic pain. BACKGROUND: Anticonvulsant drugs have been used in the management of pain since the 1960s. The clinical impression is that they are useful for neuropathic pain, especially when the pain is lancinating or burning. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the analgesic effectiveness of anticonvulsant drugs compared to either placebo or other drugs in order to provide evidence-based recommendations for pain management in clinical practice and to identify a clinical (...) research agenda. Adverse effects are also considered. SEARCH STRATEGY: Randomised trials of anticonvulsants in acute, chronic or cancer pain were identified by Medline (Silver Platter 3.0, 3.1 and 3.11) from 1966 to February 1994. In addition, 40 medical journals were hand searched (published between 1950 and 1990). Additional reports were identified from the reference list of the retrieved papers, and contacting investigators. Date of the most recent searches: 1994. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised

Cochrane2000

303. Single dose oral aspirin for acute pain.

Single dose oral aspirin for acute pain. BACKGROUND: Aspirin has been known to be an effective analgesic for many years and is commonly used throughout the world for many different pain conditions. It is important for both prescribers and patients to have the best possible information about the efficacy and safety of analgesics, and this need is reflected in patient surveys which show that postoperative pain is often poorly managed. We also need to benchmark relative efficacy and safety (...) of current analgesics so that we can compare them with new analgesics. OBJECTIVES: To quantitatively assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of a single-dose of aspirin in acute pain of moderate to severe intensity. SEARCH STRATEGY: Randomised trials were identified by searching Medline (1966 to March 1998), Embase (1980 to January 1998), the Cochrane Library (Issue 1,1998) and the Oxford Pain Relief Database (1950 to 1994). SELECTION CRITERIA: The inclusion criteria used were: full journal

Cochrane2000

304. Anticonvulsant drugs for acute and chronic pain.

Anticonvulsant drugs for acute and chronic pain. BACKGROUND: Anticonvulsant drugs have been used in the management of pain since the 1960s. The clinical impression is that they are useful for chronic neuropathic pain, especially when the pain is lancinating or burning. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the analgesic effectiveness and adverse effects of anticonvulsant drugs for pain management in clinical practice and to identify a clinical research agenda. Migraine and headache studies are excluded (...) in this revision. SEARCH STRATEGY: Randomised trials of anticonvulsants in acute, chronic or cancer pain were identified by Medline (1966-1999), Embase (1994-1999), SIGLE (1980-1999) and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL/CCTR) (Cochrane Library Issue 3, 1999). In addition, 40 medical journals were hand searched. Additional reports were identified from the reference list of the retrieved papers, and by contacting investigators. Date of most recent search: September 1999. SELECTION CRITERIA

Cochrane2000

305. Single dose dihydrocodeine for acute postoperative pain.

Single dose dihydrocodeine for acute postoperative pain. BACKGROUND: Dihydrocodeine is a synthetic opioid analgesic developed in the early 1900s. Its structure and pharmacokinetics are similar to that of codeine and it is used for the treatment of postoperative pain or as an antitussive. It is becoming increasingly important to assess the relative efficacy and harm caused by different treatments. Relative efficacy can be determined when an analgesic is compared with control under similar (...) clinical circumstances. OBJECTIVES: To quantitatively assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of single-dose dihydrocodeine compared with placebo in randomised trials in moderate to severe postoperative pain. SEARCH STRATEGY: Published reports were identified from a variety of electronic databases including Medline, Biological Abstracts, Embase, the Cochrane Library and the Oxford Pain Relief Database. Additional studies were identified from the reference lists of retrieved reports. SELECTION

Cochrane2000

306. A systematic review of lidocaine-prilocaine cream (EMLA) in the treatment of acute pain in neonates

A systematic review of lidocaine-prilocaine cream (EMLA) in the treatment of acute pain in neonates A systematic review of lidocaine-prilocaine cream (EMLA) in the treatment of acute pain in neonates A systematic review of lidocaine-prilocaine cream (EMLA) in the treatment of acute pain in neonates Taddio A, Ohlsson A, Einarson T R, Stevens B, Koren G Authors' objectives To determine the efficacy and safety of lidocaine-prilocaine 5% cream (EMLA) as an analgesic for procedural pain treatment (...) , Stevens B, Koren G. A systematic review of lidocaine-prilocaine cream (EMLA) in the treatment of acute pain in neonates. Pediatrics 1998; 101(2): E1 PubMedID Original Paper URL Other publications of related interest 1. Taddio A, Ohlsson K, Ohlsson A. Lidocaine-prilocaine cream for analgesia during circumcision in newborn boys (Cochrane Review). In: The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2000. Oxford: Update Software. Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Acute Disease; Analgesia /methods

DARE.1998

307. Comparing analgesic efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs given by different routes in acute and chronic pain: a qualitative systematic review

Comparing analgesic efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs given by different routes in acute and chronic pain: a qualitative systematic review Comparing analgesic efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs given by different routes in acute and chronic pain: a qualitative systematic review Comparing analgesic efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs given by different routes in acute and chronic pain: a qualitative systematic review Tramer M R, Williams J E, Carroll (...) , and there was no attempt to find unpublished studies. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review Published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of direct comparisons of NSAIDs, given by different routes of administration, and tested in acute or chronic pain with assessment of pain outcomes, were eligible for inclusion. Comparisons of different drugs across different routes were not analysed. The included trials were those with an internal sensitivity index in the form of a placebo control

DARE.1998

308. Relaxation techniques for acute pain management: a systematic review

Relaxation techniques for acute pain management: a systematic review Relaxation techniques for acute pain management: a systematic review Relaxation techniques for acute pain management: a systematic review Seers K, Carroll D Authors' objectives To document the effectiveness of relaxation techniques, when used alone for the management of acute pain, after surgery and during procedures. Searching The following databases were searched: MEDLINE from 1966 to March 1996; PsycLIT from 1974 to March (...) reported less anxiety compared with the other groups. No adverse events were reported in any trial for any of the treatment or control groups. Authors' conclusions If relaxation is used alone for acute pain, there is no evidence that it is harmful, and there is some weak support for its potential to reduce acute pain. However, many studies in this area suffered from methodological weaknesses and more well-designed RCTs are needed. Any use of this technique in the clinical area should be carefully

DARE.1998

309. The effectiveness of acupuncture in treating acute dental pain: a systematic review

The effectiveness of acupuncture in treating acute dental pain: a systematic review The effectiveness of acupuncture in treating acute dental pain: a systematic review The effectiveness of acupuncture in treating acute dental pain: a systematic review Ernst E, Pittler M H Authors' objectives To determine whether acupuncture is effective in treating acute dental pain. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CISCOM and the Cochrane Library were searched from their respective inceptions to July 1997 (...) . The effectiveness of acupuncture in treating acute dental pain: a systematic review. British Dental Journal 1998; 184(9): 443-447 PubMedID Other publications of related interest Jadad AR, Moore RA, Carroll D, Jenkinson C, Reynolds DJ, Gavaghan DJ, et al. Assessing the quality of reports of randomized clinical trials: is blinding necessary. Control Clin Trials 1996;17:1-12. This additional published commentary may also be of interest. Bensoussan A. Systematic review of acupuncture in dental pain. FACT 1999;4:15

DARE.1998

310. Clinical value of acute rest technetium-99m tetrofosmin tomographic myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with acute chest pain and non-diagnostic electrocardiograms

Clinical value of acute rest technetium-99m tetrofosmin tomographic myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with acute chest pain and non-diagnostic electrocardiograms Clinical value of acute rest technetium-99m tetrofosmin tomographic myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with acute chest pain and non-diagnostic electrocardiograms Clinical value of acute rest technetium-99m tetrofosmin tomographic myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with acute chest pain and non-diagnostic (...) calculations did not determine the sample size. Entry criteria for enrolment in the study were: acute chest pain suggestive of myocardial ischemia, a normal or non-diagnostic ECG, hospital admission and informed consent. Exclusion criteria were: acute MI at the time of evaluation, a history of MI or diagnostic Q waves, ECG changes in 2 or more leads, a history consistent with unstable angina or pregnancy. 385 non-consecutive patients were enrolled in the study at 6 centres. 28 patients (7%) were

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.1998

311. Systematic reviews of bed rest and advice to stay active for acute low back pain

Systematic reviews of bed rest and advice to stay active for acute low back pain Systematic reviews of bed rest and advice to stay active for acute low back pain Systematic reviews of bed rest and advice to stay active for acute low back pain Waddell G, Feder G, Lewis M Authors' objectives To review all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of the effectiveness of bed rest and advice to stay active for acute back pain. Two reviews were presented, one for each intervention. Searching MEDLINE (...) . Participants included in the review Lower-back pain. Patients aged at least 18 years with a main symptom of lower-back pain of up to 3 months' duration. This included patients with recurrent attacks, acute exacerbations of chronic back pain, and sciatica. Outcomes assessed in the review Patient-centred outcomes were assessed. These included the following: rate of recovery from the acute attack; relief of pain; restoration of function; satisfaction with treatment; days off work and return to work

DARE.1997

312. Paracetamol with and without codeine in acute pain: a quantitative systematic review

Paracetamol with and without codeine in acute pain: a quantitative systematic review Paracetamol with and without codeine in acute pain: a quantitative systematic review Paracetamol with and without codeine in acute pain: a quantitative systematic review Moore A, Collins S, Carroll D, McQuay H Authors' objectives To assess the analgesic effect obtained from single oral doses of paracetamol alone, and in combination with codeine, in post-operative pain. Searching The following sources were (...) articles were not considered. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of paracetamol in post-operative pain (postdental extraction, postsurgical or postpartum pain). Inclusion criteria were: full journal publication, acute post-operative pain with total pain relief as a derived pain outcome, oral administration, adult patients, baseline pain of moderate-to-severe intensity, blinded design and randomised allocation to treatment groups

DARE.1997

313. Conservative treatment of acute and chronic nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials of the most common interventions

Conservative treatment of acute and chronic nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials of the most common interventions Conservative treatment of acute and chronic nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials of the most common interventions Conservative treatment of acute and chronic nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials of the most common interventions van Tulder M W, Koes B W (...) , Bouter L M Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of the most common conservative types of treatment for patients with acute and chronic nonspecific lower-back pain (LBP). Searching MEDLINE was searched from 1966 to September 1995, EMBASE from 1980 to September 1995, and PsycLIT from 1984 to September 1995; the search terms were provided. The bibliographies of identified studies were examined. Only English language publications were selected. Study selection Study designs of evaluations

DARE.1997

314. Randomized controlled trials in industrial low back pain relating to return to work - Part 1: acute interventions

Randomized controlled trials in industrial low back pain relating to return to work - Part 1: acute interventions Randomized controlled trials in industrial low back pain relating to return to work - Part 1: acute interventions Randomized controlled trials in industrial low back pain relating to return to work - Part 1: acute interventions Scheer S J, Radack K L, O'Brien D R Authors' objectives To identify treatment-related factors associated with successful return to work of patients (...) included. Historical control studies were excluded. Specific interventions included in the review The article focuses on interventions for acute back pain (less than 4 weeks), in particular bedrest, exercise, back school, case management methods and manipulation. Participants included in the review Persons with LBP were included. Outcomes assessed in the review The following work-related outcomes were assessed: the number of days of sickness absence, initial episode, number of days unemployed, 1 year

DARE.1995

315. The outcomes and costs of care for acute low back pain among patients seen by primary care practitioners, chiropractors, and orthopedic surgeons

The outcomes and costs of care for acute low back pain among patients seen by primary care practitioners, chiropractors, and orthopedic surgeons The outcomes and costs of care for acute low back pain among patients seen by primary care practitioners, chiropractors, and orthopedic surgeons The outcomes and costs of care for acute low back pain among patients seen by primary care practitioners, chiropractors, and orthopedic surgeons Carey T S, Garrett J, Jackman A, McLaughlin C, Fryer J, Smucker (...) study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Patients with acute low back pain of less than 10 weeks' duration presenting to a range of health care providers. Setting Secondary and primary care. The economic study was carried out in North Carolina, USA. Dates to which data relate Effectiveness and resource use data were collected from patients enrolled in the study between June 1992 and March 1993. The fiscal year was not explicitly specified. Source of effectiveness data Effectiveness

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.1995

316. The treatment of acute low back pain: bed rest, exercises, or ordinary activity?

The treatment of acute low back pain: bed rest, exercises, or ordinary activity? The treatment of acute low back pain: bed rest, exercises, or ordinary activity? The treatment of acute low back pain: bed rest, exercises, or ordinary activity? Malmivaara A, Hakkinen U, Aro T, Heinrichs M L, Koskenniemi L, Kuosma E, Lappi S, Paloheimo R, Servo C, Vaaranen V, Hernberg S Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each (...) , Lappi S, Paloheimo R, Servo C, Vaaranen V, Hernberg S. The treatment of acute low back pain: bed rest, exercises, or ordinary activity? New England Journal of Medicine 1995; 332(6): 351-355 PubMedID DOI Original Paper URL Other publications of related interest Comments and discussion in: New England Journal of Medicine 1995;332(26):1786-1787. Assessment and commentary in ACP Journal Club 1995;123(1):6. Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Activities of Daily Living; Acute Disease

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.1995

317. Failure of information as an intervention to modify clinical management: a time-series trial in patients with acute chest pain

Failure of information as an intervention to modify clinical management: a time-series trial in patients with acute chest pain Failure of information as an intervention to modify clinical management: a time-series trial in patients with acute chest pain Failure of information as an intervention to modify clinical management: a time-series trial in patients with acute chest pain Lee T H, Pearson S D, Johnson P A, Garcia T B, Weisberg M C, Guadagnoli E, Cook F, Goldman L Record Status (...) This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology A non-coercive, low-intensity intervention comprising risk information and triage recommendations being communicated without person-to-person contact for the management of acute chest pain. Type of intervention

NHS Economic Evaluation Database.1995

318. The treatment of acute low back pain--bed rest, exercises, or ordinary activity?

The treatment of acute low back pain--bed rest, exercises, or ordinary activity? 7823996 1995 02 14 1995 02 14 2010 03 24 0028-4793 332 6 1995 Feb 09 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. The treatment of acute low back pain--bed rest, exercises, or ordinary activity? 351-5 Bed rest and back-extension exercises are often prescribed for patients with acute low back pain, but the effectiveness of these two competing treatments remains controversial. We conducted a controlled trial (...) among employees of the city of Helsinki, Finland, who presented to an occupational health care center with acute, nonspecific low back pain. The patients were randomly assigned to one of three treatments: bed rest for two days (67 patients), back-mobilizing exercises (52 patients), or the continuation of ordinary activities as tolerated (the control group; 67 patients). Outcomes and costs were assessed after 3 and 12 weeks. After 3 and 12 weeks, the patients in the control group had better recovery

NEJM1995

319. Effect of homoeopathy on pain and other events after acute trauma: placebo controlled trial with bilateral oral surgery.

Effect of homoeopathy on pain and other events after acute trauma: placebo controlled trial with bilateral oral surgery. 7613277 1995 08 24 1995 08 24 2013 09 22 0959-8138 310 6992 1995 Jun 03 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Effect of homoeopathy on pain and other events after acute trauma: placebo controlled trial with bilateral oral surgery. 1439-42 To examine whether homoeopathy has any effect on pain and other inflammatory events after surgery. Randomised double blind, placebo controlled (...) . Postoperative swelling was not significantly affected by homoeopathy, but treatment tended to give less reduction in ability to open mouth. No noticeable difference was seen in postoperative bleeding, side effects, or complaints. Thirteen of the 24 patients preferred the postoperative course with placebo. No positive evidence was found for efficacy of homoeopathic treatment on pain and other inflammatory events after an acute soft tissue and bone injury inflicted by a surgical intervention. Differences

BMJ1995 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro

320. Safety of early pain relief for acute abdominal pain.

Safety of early pain relief for acute abdominal pain. 1393034 1992 11 04 1992 11 04 2010 09 07 0959-8138 305 6853 1992 Sep 05 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Safety of early pain relief for acute abdominal pain. 554-6 (a) to determine the efficacy of papaveretum in treating pain when administered early to patients presenting with acute abdominal pain and (b) to assess its effect on subsequent diagnosis and management. Prospective, randomised, placebo controlled study. Walsgrave Hospital (...) in treatment group, p < 0.0001). Forty eight patients were deemed to be comfortable after papaveretum compared with nine after saline. Incorrect diagnoses and management decisions applied to two patients after papaveretum compared with nine patients after saline. Early administration of opiate analgesia to patients with acute abdominal pain can greatly reduce their pain. This does not interfere with diagnosis, which may even be facilitated despite a reduction in the severity of physical signs

BMJ1992 Full Text: Link to full Text with Trip Pro