Latest & greatest articles for acne

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on acne or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on acne and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Acne treatment and clinical papers

Acne is a common skin condition characterised by whiteheads (or blackheads), pimples and oily skin. It can lead to possible scarring. It is typically caused when hair follicles become inflamed and the sebaceous glands in the skin are overactive. The over production of sebum and a combination of dead skin cells and dirt can clog follicles and pores causing a break out. Acne can affect any age group but it’s more common in adolescents.

There are many ways to treat acne depending on the severity of the case. Treatments include a range of medications such as topical retinoids, antibiotics and in severe cases isotretinoin is prescribed. Research is ongoing to determine the side effects and harms caused by these drugs. Clinical trials and studies are vital to assess treatment.

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on acne ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for acne

1. Acne clinical guideline Full Text available with Trip Pro

Acne clinical guideline Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search JAAD & JAAD Case Reports Search Terms Search within Search Access provided by Volume 74, Issue 5, Pages 945–973.e33 Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris Work Group:, x Andrea L. Zaenglein Affiliations Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania , MD (Co-Chair) a , x Arun L. Pathy Affiliations (...) translations or adaptations of the article | Fig 1 Treatment algorithm for the management of acne vulgaris in adolescents and young adults. The double asterisks (∗∗) indicate that the drug may be prescribed as a fixed combination product or as separate component. BP , Benzoyl peroxide. Hide Pane Expand all Collapse all Article Outline Acne is one of the most common disorders treated by dermatologists and other health care providers. While it most often affects adolescents, it is not uncommon in adults

2016 American Academy of Dermatology

2. Acne

Acne Evidence Maps - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading

2018 Trip Evidence Maps

3. Acne

. These can be found via searching the site. Top results for acne 1. Acne vulgaris Acne vulgaris - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Acne vulgaris - Summary Acne vulgaris is a chronic skin condition in which blockage or inflammation of the hair follicles and accompanying sebaceous glands (known as pilosebaceous units) occurs. It principally affects the face, the back, and the chest, and usually first occurs around the age of puberty. Acne is most prevalent among adolescents and young adults (...) by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example 2018 7. Acne vulgaris Acne vulgaris - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Acne vulgaris Last reviewed: August 2018 Last updated: June 2018 Summary Acne may affect any age group, but it is most common in adolescents. Lesions consist of non-inflammatory comedones (whiteheads and blackheads) and inflammatory papules, pustules

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

4. Management of acne

and inflammatory acne. 16 Since the last Canadian acne guideline was published in 2000, 17 evidence for multiple addi­ tional treatments has been published. Thus, there was an unmet need for an updated, systematic­ ally developed, evidence­ based Canadian acne clinical practice guideline. This guideline pro­ vides recommendations adapted to the Canadian health care system to assist Canadian health care providers in the diagnosis of acne vulgaris, including investigations where appropriate; it also provides (...) updated information on the patho­ genesis of acne, outlines methods for evaluating acne severity, provides evidence­ based guidance on treatments for acne vulgaris and recommends treatments for acne according to severity. To support clinical practice, recommenda­ tions are made for three categories of acne sever­ ity: comedonal acne, which consists of small white papules (closed comedones) or grey–white papules (open comedones), which are due to complete or partial ductal occlusion, respec­ tively

2015 CPG Infobase

5. Acne - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Treatment

Acne - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Treatment Acne - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Treatment - medSask Home - College of Pharmacy and Nutrition - University of Saskatchewan Toggle Menu Search the U of S Search Acne - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Treatment Acne vulgaris (acne) is the formation of comedones, papules, pustules, nodules, and/or cysts as a result of obstruction and inflammation of pilosebaceous units (hair follicles and their accompanying sebaceous gland (...) want to assess the severity of the patient’s acne: Mild: Some papules or pustules; no nodules or cysts Moderate: Many papules and pustules; few nodules, no cysts Severe: Numerous papules and pustules; many nodules or cysts Rule out the following conditions which have signs / symptoms that may resemble acne vulgaris: Comedones Pustules Papules Nodules Other Open Closed Vulgaris X X X X X Conglobata X XX XX Cysts, abscesses, sinus tracts Fulminans X XX XX Ulcerating cysts Contact pomade use XX X

2018 medSask

6. Acne vulgaris

Acne vulgaris Acne vulgaris - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Acne vulgaris Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: June 2018 Summary Acne may affect any age group, but it is most common in adolescents. Lesions consist of non-inflammatory comedones (whiteheads and blackheads) and inflammatory papules, pustules, nodules, and cysts. Systemic effects may be present with acne fulminans, a rare variant (...) of nodulocystic acne. Treatments include topical retinoids, keratolytics, and antibiotics; severe nodulocystic acne may require oral isotretinoin. Definition Acne vulgaris is a skin disease affecting the pilosebaceous unit. It is characterised by comedones, papules, pustules, nodules, cysts, and/or scarring, primarily on the face and trunk. Clinical manifestations range from mild comedonal acne to severe nodulocystic acne, which can be permanently disfiguring. In addition to the physical lesions, acne can

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. British Association of Dermatologists guidelines for the management of hidradenitis suppurativa (acne inversa)

British Association of Dermatologists guidelines for the management of hidradenitis suppurativa (acne inversa) 4 Fitzroy Square, London W1T 5HQ Tel: 020 7383 0266 Fax: 020 7388 5263 e-mail: admin@bad.org.uk Registered Charity No. 258474 HIDRADENITIS SUPPURATIVA What are the aims of this leaflet? This leaflet has been written to help you understand more about hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). It tells you what it is, what may cause it, what can be done about it, and where you can find out more (...) system is involved in producing inflammation and treatments that reduce the immune system activity may be helpful (see below). ? In a few people with HS there is a link to the bowel condition Crohn ’s disease. ? There may be a link with acne and pilonidal sinus (a chronic abscess at the base of the spine). ? Smoking and obesity are linked with HS, but the condition can also affect non-smokers of normal weight. ? Poor hygiene does not cause hidradenitis suppurativa. Is hidradenitis suppurativa

2019 British Association of Dermatologists

9. Lymecycline in the treatment of acne: an efficacious, safe and cost-effective alternative to minocycline. (Abstract)

Lymecycline in the treatment of acne: an efficacious, safe and cost-effective alternative to minocycline. A comparison of efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of lymecycline and minocycline in the treatment of acne vulgaris has been addressed. This was a multicenter, randomized, investigator-masked, parallel group trial involving patients with moderate to moderately severe acne vulgaris, receiving either lymecycline or minocycline for 12 weeks. Efficacy and safety evaluation was performed

2003 European journal of dermatology : EJD Controlled trial quality: uncertain

11. Safety and Efficacy Comparison of Minocycline Microgranules vs Lymecycline in the Treatment of Mild to Moderate Acne: Randomized, Evaluator-blinded, Parallel, and Prospective Clinical Trial for 8 Weeks. (Abstract)

Safety and Efficacy Comparison of Minocycline Microgranules vs Lymecycline in the Treatment of Mild to Moderate Acne: Randomized, Evaluator-blinded, Parallel, and Prospective Clinical Trial for 8 Weeks. Minocycline and lymecycline are used in the treatment of acne, but there is not enough evidence to support superior efficacy of one of them.170 participants from 14 to 34 years old with mild to moderate facial acne vulgaris were recruited. 84 had 100 mg of minocycline in a single daily dose

2014 Journal of drugs in dermatology : JDD Controlled trial quality: uncertain

12. How Acne Bumps Cause the Blues: The Influence of Acne Vulgaris on Self-Esteem Full Text available with Trip Pro

How Acne Bumps Cause the Blues: The Influence of Acne Vulgaris on Self-Esteem Acne vulgaris is one of the most common dermatologic complaints. Although dermatologists are skilled at treating acne, invisible psychological scars can be left by the disease. We review 13 articles that examined the effect of acne vulgaris on patients' self-esteem. Overall, these studies demonstrated that acne has a negative effect on self-esteem among patients of all age groups. These effects most strongly affect (...) women and those with severe acne (both subjectively and objectively). Despite the impact on self-esteem, only a minority of patients seek medical treatment, and even fewer seek treatment from a dermatologist. As dermatologists, we are trained in managing acne. We can provide early and effective treatment that improves both the physical and psychological effects. It is up to us to bridge the gap between those suffering from acne and their access to medical treatment.

2017 International journal of women's dermatology

13. Rosacea - acne

(phymatous rosacea), most commonly rhinophyma. Ocular symptoms (ocular rosacea), such as red, gritty, dry or irritated eyes, and the person may describe a foreign body sensation in the eyes. Additional features such as burning, dry skin, oedema, and plaques may be present. Alternative conditions that present similarly to acne rosacea should be excluded (such as acne vulgaris, seborrhoeic dermatitis, and contact dermatitis). Management of acne rosacea is largely guided by the type and severity of symptoms (...) [ ]; expert opinion in the review articles Rosacea [ ] and Rosacea: A review [ ]; and the British Medical Journal (BMJ) Best practice review Rosacea [ ]. What else might it be? What else might it be? Acne rosacea may present similarly to other skin conditions, such as: Acne vulgaris — usually features comedones, without telangiectasia, flushing, or significant erythema. It can also affect the back and chest, and usually first occurs around puberty, although older people may be affected. For more

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

14. A comparison of the efficacy and safety of lymecycline and minocycline in patients with moderately severe acne vulgaris. (Abstract)

A comparison of the efficacy and safety of lymecycline and minocycline in patients with moderately severe acne vulgaris. A multicentre, randomised, double-blind and double-dummy study was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of lymecycline (n = 71) with that of minocycline (n = 73) in 144 patients with moderately severe acne vulgaris. Patients with an acne score of 1-5 on the Leeds scale received oral lymecycline, 300 mg/day for 2 weeks, then 150 mg/day for 10 weeks or oral minocycline (...) were reduced by 50.6% and 52.2% with lymecycline and minocycline, respectively, and non-inflammatory lesions by 40.6% and 32.2%. Acne severity was reduced by 42.4% with lymecycline and by 47.9% with minocycline. A total of 4.3% of lymecycline recipients and 4.1% of minocycline recipients experienced treatment-related adverse events, the majority of which were mild in nature. Lymecycline was as effective as minocycline for the treatment of moderately severe acne vulgaris. Both treatments were well

1999 European journal of dermatology : EJD Controlled trial quality: uncertain

15. Systematic review of acupuncture for acne vulgaris

Systematic review of acupuncture for acne vulgaris Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures Timing and effect

2015 PROSPERO

16. Randomized Double-blind Study on the Benefit of Spironolactone for Treating Acne of Adult Woman.

: Recruiting First Posted : November 7, 2017 Last Update Posted : March 15, 2019 See Sponsor: Nantes University Hospital Information provided by (Responsible Party): Nantes University Hospital Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Acne vulgaris of adult woman has increased over the past 10 years; it affects currently 20% to 30% of adult women. The physiopathology of adult woman acne is distinguished from the teenager one by essentially 2 factors: hormonal factor with a peripheral (...) of patients but they showed that at low doses (lower than 200mg/day), spironolactone can be effective against acne. In that context, it seemed clearly interesting to perform the first double-blind randomized study spironolactone vs cyclines which remains the moderate acne reference treatment and to demonstrate the superiority of spironolactone's efficacy in order to establish it as alternative way to cycline. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Acne Vulgaris Drug: spironolactone Drug

2017 Clinical Trials

17. A Review of hormone-based therapies to treat adult acne vulgaris in women Full Text available with Trip Pro

A Review of hormone-based therapies to treat adult acne vulgaris in women Hormone-based therapies including combined oral contraceptive medications and spironolactone are considered effective therapies to treat adult acne in women. Our objective is to provide a concise and comprehensive overview of the types of hormonal therapy that are available to treat acne and comment on their efficacy and safety profiles for clinical practice. A systematic search using the PubMed Database was conducted (...) and spironolactone as adjuvant and monotherapies are safe and effective to treat women with adult acne. However, appropriate clinical examinations, screening, and individual risk assessments particularly for venous thromboembolism risk must be conducted prior to initiating therapy.

2017 International journal of women's dermatology

18. Development of a New Patient-Reported Outcome Measure to Evaluate Treatments for Acne and Acne Scarring: The ACNE-Q. (Abstract)

Development of a New Patient-Reported Outcome Measure to Evaluate Treatments for Acne and Acne Scarring: The ACNE-Q. Psychosocial concerns represent important outcomes in studies of treatments for acne and acne scarring. Also, important, but largely overlooked, is the concept of appearance.To design an acne-specific patient-reported outcome measure for acne and acne scarring.We used a mixed methods approach. Phase 1 involved 21 patient interviews that were audio-recorded, transcribed and coded (...) . Concepts were identified and developed into scales that were refined through 10 cognitive interviews and input from 16 clinical experts. Phase 2 involved data collection at hospital and community-based dermatology clinics in Canada and the United States. Eligible participants were aged 12 years and older with acne and/or acne scars on the face, chest and/or back. Rasch Measurement Theory analyses were performed to examine psychometric properties.Phase 1 led to the development of 7 scales that measure

2019 British Journal of Dermatology

19. Skin microneedling plus Platelet-Rich Plasma versus skin microneedling alone in the treatment of atrophic post acne scars: a split face comparative study. (Abstract)

Skin microneedling plus Platelet-Rich Plasma versus skin microneedling alone in the treatment of atrophic post acne scars: a split face comparative study. Acne scarring is a permanent disfiguring sequel, which can take varied morphological forms. Many therapeutic measures have been performed to improve acne scarring such as microneedling. Our objective is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of microneedling alone versus microneedling combined with platelet rich plasma in the treatment of post (...) acne.The study included 35 patients with mild to severe post acne atrophic scar. All the patients received four sequential treatments of skin microneedling alone on the right side of the face and skin microneedling followed by topical application of platelet rich plasma (PRP) on the left side of the face with an interval of 3 weeks. Two blinded dermatologists evaluated the clinical response according to qualitative global acne scarring system grading of Goodman & Baron. Patients are queried about

2017 Journal of Dermatological Treatment