Latest & greatest articles for acne

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on acne or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on acne and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Acne treatment and clinical papers

Acne is a common skin condition characterised by whiteheads (or blackheads), pimples and oily skin. It can lead to possible scarring. It is typically caused when hair follicles become inflamed and the sebaceous glands in the skin are overactive. The over production of sebum and a combination of dead skin cells and dirt can clog follicles and pores causing a break out. Acne can affect any age group but it’s more common in adolescents.

There are many ways to treat acne depending on the severity of the case. Treatments include a range of medications such as topical retinoids, antibiotics and in severe cases isotretinoin is prescribed. Research is ongoing to determine the side effects and harms caused by these drugs. Clinical trials and studies are vital to assess treatment.

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on acne ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for acne

1. Insulin-sensitising drugs versus the combined oral contraceptive pill for hirsutism, acne and risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and endometrial cancer in polycystic ovary syndrome. (PubMed)

Insulin-sensitising drugs versus the combined oral contraceptive pill for hirsutism, acne and risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and endometrial cancer in polycystic ovary syndrome. Insulin-sensitizing drugs (ISDs) have recently been advocated as possibly a safer and more effective long-term treatment than the oral contraceptive pill (OCP) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). It is important to directly compare the efficacy and safety of ISDs versus OCPs in the long-term (...) of difference in effect between metformin and the OCP on hirsutism and acne. There was either insufficient or no data on the relative efficacy of metformin or the OCP (alone or in combination) for preventing the development of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or endometrial cancer. Metformin was less effective than the OCP in improving menstrual pattern (Peto odds ratio (OR) 0.08, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.45). Metformin resulted in a higher incidence of gastrointestinal (Peto OR 7.75, 95% CI 1.32 to 45.71

2007 Cochrane

2. Rosacea - acne

Rosacea - acne Rosacea - acne - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Rosacea - acne: Summary Acne rosacea is a chronic relapsing skin condition affecting the face, characterized by recurrent episodes of facial flushing, erythema, telangiectasia, papules and pustules. There may be eye symptoms (ocular rosacea), which are usually bilateral. Acne rosacea can be classified into four types (erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular, phymatous, and ocular) and one variant (granulomatous (...) depression in severe cases), ocular conditions (such as blepharitis, conjunctivitis, meibomian cyst, or keratitis), or rosacea fulminans (a severe form of acne rosacea). Diagnosis is usually made on the basis of one or more clinical features, typically affecting the convexities of the central face, and include: Flushing or transient erythema (pre-rosacea). Persistent erythema (erythematotelangiectatic rosacea). Telangiectasia (erythematotelangiectatic rosacea). Papules and pustules (papulopustular

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

3. Acne vulgaris

Acne vulgaris Acne vulgaris - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Acne vulgaris: Summary Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin condition affecting mainly the face, back and chest - it is characterised by blockage and inflammation of the pilosebaceous unit (the hair follicle, hair shaft and sebaceous gland). It presents with lesions which can be non-inflammatory (comedones), inflammatory (papules, pustules and nodules) or a mixture of both. Up to 95% of adolescents in Western (...) industrialized countries are affected by acne to some extent — 20 to 35% develop moderate or severe acne. Complications of acne include skin changes such as scarring, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation or depigmentation and psychosocial problems such as depression and anxiety. All people with acne should be advised: To avoid over cleaning the skin (which may cause dryness and irritation) - acne is not caused by poor hygiene. To use non-comedogenic make-up, cleansers and/or emollients with a pH close

2014 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

5. Treatment of Severe Acne with Low-dose Isotretinoin. (PubMed)

Treatment of Severe Acne with Low-dose Isotretinoin. 22377969 2012 11 28 2015 11 19 1651-2057 92 3 2012 May Acta dermato-venereologica Acta Derm. Venereol. Treatment of severe acne with low-dose isotretinoin. 247-8 10.2340/00015555-1325 Mehra Tarun T Borelli Claudia C Burgdorf Walter W Röcken Martin M Schaller Martin M eng Letter Sweden Acta Derm Venereol 0370310 0001-5555 0 Adrenal Cortex Hormones 0 Anti-Bacterial Agents 0 Dermatologic Agents 0 Naphthalenes 1L4806J2QF Adapalene 3U02EL437C (...) Clindamycin 63937KV33D Erythromycin EH28UP18IF Isotretinoin W9WZN9A0GM Benzoyl Peroxide IM Acne Vulgaris drug therapy Adapalene Adolescent Adrenal Cortex Hormones therapeutic use Anti-Bacterial Agents therapeutic use Benzoyl Peroxide therapeutic use Clindamycin therapeutic use Dermatologic Agents administration & dosage Drug Therapy, Combination Erythromycin therapeutic use Female Humans Isotretinoin administration & dosage Male Naphthalenes therapeutic use Photography Retrospective Studies Severity

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2012 Acta Dermato-Venereologica

6. Acne vulgaris

Acne vulgaris Acne vulgaris - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Acne vulgaris Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: June 2018 Summary Acne may affect any age group, but it is most common in adolescents. Lesions consist of non-inflammatory comedones (whiteheads and blackheads) and inflammatory papules, pustules, nodules, and cysts. Systemic effects may be present with acne fulminans, a rare variant (...) of nodulocystic acne. Treatments include topical retinoids, keratolytics, and antibiotics; severe nodulocystic acne may require oral isotretinoin. Definition Acne vulgaris is a skin disease affecting the pilosebaceous unit. It is characterised by comedones, papules, pustules, nodules, cysts, and/or scarring, primarily on the face and trunk. Clinical manifestations range from mild comedonal acne to severe nodulocystic acne, which can be permanently disfiguring. In addition to the physical lesions, acne can

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. Acne

Acne Evidence Maps - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading

2018 Trip Evidence Maps

9. Cutibacterium acnes (Propionibacterium acnes) and acne vulgaris: a brief look at the latest updates. (PubMed)

Cutibacterium acnes (Propionibacterium acnes) and acne vulgaris: a brief look at the latest updates. While the commensal bacterium Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) is involved in the maintenance of a healthy skin, it can also act as an opportunistic pathogen in acne vulgaris. The latest findings on P. acnes shed light on the critical role of a tight equilibrium between members of its phylotypes and within the skin microbiota in the development of this skin disease. Indeed, contrary to what (...) was previously thought, proliferation of P. acnes is not the trigger of acne as patients with acne do not harbour more P. acnes in follicles than normal individuals. Instead, the loss of the skin microbial diversity together with the activation of the innate immunity might lead to this chronic inflammatory condition. This review provides results of the most recent biochemical and genomic investigations that led to the new taxonomic classification of P. acnes renamed Cutibacterium acnes (C. acnes

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2018 Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

10. Management of acne

Management of acne Guidelines CMAJ ©2015 8872147 Canada Inc. or its licensors CMAJ 1 CME A cne is one of the most burdensome dis­ eases globally. 1,2 Its prevalence among those aged 12 to 24 years is estimated to be 85%, although it can persist beyond young adulthood despite treatment. 3–5 Acne can adversely affect quality of life 6–13 and may lead to emotional distress and physical scarring. 14,15 The clinical presentation of acne (Figure 1) varies from primarily comedonal to mixed comedonal (...) and inflammatory acne. 16 Since the last Canadian acne guideline was published in 2000, 17 evidence for multiple addi­ tional treatments has been published. Thus, there was an unmet need for an updated, systematic­ ally developed, evidence­ based Canadian acne clinical practice guideline. This guideline pro­ vides recommendations adapted to the Canadian health care system to assist Canadian health care providers in the diagnosis of acne vulgaris, including investigations where appropriate; it also provides

2015 CPG Infobase

11. The Effects of a Low Glycemic Load Diet on Acne Vulgaris in Adolescents and Young Adults

The Effects of a Low Glycemic Load Diet on Acne Vulgaris in Adolescents and Young Adults "The Effects of a Low Glycemic Load Diet on Acne Vulgaris in Adolescent" by Andrew White < > > > > > Title Author Date of Graduation Summer 8-8-2015 Degree Type Capstone Project Degree Name Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies First Advisor Mark Pedemonte, MD Second Advisor Annjanette Sommers, PA-C, MS Rights . Abstract Background: Acne vulgaris is a common disease amongst adolescents in Western (...) societies. It is an interesting problem because, while it is very common among this particular population, it is very rare in non-Westernized societies. This observation has lead to recent exploration of what factors in Western society may, at least in part, be responsible for this. Recently there have been several epidemiological studies linking certain foods to acne. Of the foods showing a positive correlation, high glycemic load foods have been the most extensively studied. There have been a number

2015 Pacific University EBM Capstone Project

13. Acne

Acne Top results for acne - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading (...) history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for acne The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

14. Light therapies for acne. (PubMed)

Light therapies for acne. Acne vulgaris is a very common skin problem that presents with blackheads, whiteheads, and inflamed spots. It frequently results in physical scarring and may cause psychological distress. The use of oral and topical treatments can be limited in some people due to ineffectiveness, inconvenience, poor tolerability or side-effects. Some studies have suggested promising results for light therapies.To explore the effects of light treatment of different wavelengths (...) these searches in July 2016 but these results have not yet been incorporated into the review.We included RCTs of light for treatment of acne vulgaris, regardless of language or publication status.We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane.We included 71 studies, randomising a total of 4211 participants.Most studies were small (median 31 participants) and included participants with mild to moderate acne of both sexes and with a mean age of 20 to 30 years. Light interventions differed

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2016 Cochrane

15. Acne vulgaris

Acne vulgaris Acne - Wikipedia Acne From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from ) This article is about a skin disease common during adolescence. For other acneiform skin diseases, see . Acne Other names Acne vulgaris Acne vulgaris in an 18-year-old male during Symptoms , , oily skin, , reduced , , Usual onset , , , Treatment Lifestyle changes, medications, medical procedures Medication , , , , , Frequency 633 million affected (2015) Acne , also known as acne vulgaris , is a long (...) -term that occurs when are clogged with and . It is characterized by , , oily skin, and possible . It primarily affects areas of the skin with a relatively high number of , including the face, upper part of the chest, and back. The resulting appearance can lead to , reduced and, in extreme cases, or . is thought to be the primary cause of acne in 80% of cases. The role of diet and is unclear, and neither nor exposure to sunlight appear to play a part. In both , called appear to be part

2012 Wikipedia

16. Skin microneedling plus Platelet-Rich Plasma versus skin microneedling alone in the treatment of atrophic post acne scars: a split face comparative study. (PubMed)

Skin microneedling plus Platelet-Rich Plasma versus skin microneedling alone in the treatment of atrophic post acne scars: a split face comparative study. Acne scarring is a permanent disfiguring sequel, which can take varied morphological forms. Many therapeutic measures have been performed to improve acne scarring such as microneedling. Our objective is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of microneedling alone versus microneedling combined with platelet rich plasma in the treatment of post (...) acne.The study included 35 patients with mild to severe post acne atrophic scar. All the patients received four sequential treatments of skin microneedling alone on the right side of the face and skin microneedling followed by topical application of platelet rich plasma (PRP) on the left side of the face with an interval of 3 weeks. Two blinded dermatologists evaluated the clinical response according to qualitative global acne scarring system grading of Goodman & Baron. Patients are queried about

2017 Journal of Dermatological Treatment

17. Efficacy and Safety of Once-Daily Dapsone Gel, 7.5% for Treatment of Adolescents and Adults With Acne Vulgaris: First of Two Identically Designed, Large, Multicenter, Randomized, Vehicle-controlled Trials. (PubMed)

Efficacy and Safety of Once-Daily Dapsone Gel, 7.5% for Treatment of Adolescents and Adults With Acne Vulgaris: First of Two Identically Designed, Large, Multicenter, Randomized, Vehicle-controlled Trials. Treatment of acne vulgaris (acne) with dapsone gel, 5% requires twice-daily dosing, and some patients may not adhere to this regimen.
The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of a new, once-daily formulation of dapsone gel, 7.5%, with a 50% higher dapsone (...) concentration, versus vehicle over 12 weeks in patients with acne.
This 12-week, randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled, multicenter clinical trial enrolled patients with moderate acne aged 12 years and older with 20 to 50 inflammatory lesions and 30 to 100 noninflammatory lesions on the face, and an acne grade of 3 (moderate) on the Global Acne Assessment Score (GAAS). Patients were randomized to receive topical dapsone gel, 7.5% or vehicle once daily for 12 weeks. Investigators assessed GAAS

2016 Journal of drugs in dermatology : JDD

18. Safety and effectiveness of amoxicillin in the treatment of inflammatory acne (PubMed)

Safety and effectiveness of amoxicillin in the treatment of inflammatory acne Acne is a common skin disease that predominantly affects teenagers and young adults. Systemic antibiotic therapy, including tetracyclines, macrolides, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, is indicated in moderate-to-severe inflammatory disease. However, in certain cases, these antibiotics and other commonly prescribed treatments including oral contraceptives, spironolactone, and isotretinoin may be prohibited (...) , especially in cases of pregnancy and drug intolerance. In this retrospective study, we assessed the safety and efficacy of systemic amoxicillin, which has a favorable tolerability profile and compatibility with pregnancy in the treatment of inflammatory acne.

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2018 International journal of women's dermatology

19. Complementary therapies for acne: do they hit the spot?

Complementary therapies for acne: do they hit the spot? Complementary therapies for acne: do they hit the spot? - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By February 6, 2015 // What a misery acne can be and few teens escape it completely. It can last well into adulthood too. There are many treatments available, both over-the-counter and on prescription. Many people look to alternatives to medical treatment, such as herbal preparations and changes to their diet. Are they any good? A team from set (...) out to find out. Their brought together the best available evidence from randomised controlled trials on complementary therapies for acne. There are 35 trials (over 3000 people) looking at herbal medicine, acupuncture, wet cupping, diet, purified bee venom, and tea tree oil. Here’s what they found: Low- versus high-glycaemic load diets were compared. There was no clear evidence of a difference between groups in the number of non-inflammatory lesions after 12 weeks (2 studies combined). The low

2015 Evidently Cochrane

20. Certain Dairy Products Can Negatively Affect Acne Severity in Young Adult Korean and Malaysian Populations

Certain Dairy Products Can Negatively Affect Acne Severity in Young Adult Korean and Malaysian Populations "Certain Dairy Products Can Negatively Affect Acne Severity in Young Ad" by Velika Lotwala < > > > > > Title Author Date of Graduation Summer 8-13-2016 Degree Type Capstone Project Degree Name Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies First Advisor Saje Davis-Risen, PA-C, MS Second Advisor Annjanette Sommers, PA-C, MS Rights . Abstract Background: Acne vulgaris is a widespread (...) and complex skin condition affecting mainly young adults in developed nations. The correlation between diet and acne has long been debated. Some medical providers routinely advised acne prone patients to refrain from eating excessive sugar and certain foods such as French fries or chocolate however other medical providers dismissed this idea as myth. Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between certain dairy products and acne severity, particularly in young adult populations. Furthermore

2016 Pacific University EBM Capstone Project