Latest & greatest articles for acetaminophen

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Top results for acetaminophen

1. Paracetamol: widely used and largely ineffective

Paracetamol: widely used and largely ineffective Paracetamol: widely used and largely ineffective - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By August 12, 2016 // In this guest blog, Andrew Moore, who has authored over 200 systematic reviews, many on pain, lifts the lid on paracetamol. Effective and safe? We are challenged to think again… People with pain have some very simple demands. They want the pain gone, and they want it gone now. A successful result is one where the pain is reduced by half (...) or more, or where they have no or only mild pain. That result delivers not just on pain, but also improves sleep, depression, quality of life, work, and the ability to get on with life. Paracetamol – the ‘go-to’ painkiller but largely ineffective For many years paracetamol has been the ‘go-to’ medicine for all sorts of acute and chronic pain conditions. NICE recommends it for back pain and osteoarthritis, and paracetamol or paracetamol/opioid combinations are among the most common medicines

2016 Evidently Cochrane

2. Paracetamol plus ibuprofen reduced fever in young children faster than paracetamol alone but not ibuprofen alone

. Patients: 156 children 6 months to 6 years of age (mean age 2 y, 56% boys) who had an axillary temperature of 37.8°C to 41°C and could be managed at home. Exclusion criteria included dehydration and chronic neurological disease. Interventions: paracetamol (PCM) (acetaminophen), 15 mg/kg (every 4–6 h, maximum 4 doses/d), plus ibuprofen (IBF), 10 mg/kg (every 6–8 h, maximum 3 doses/d) (n = 52); PCM alone (n = 52); or IBF alone (n = 52) for ⩽48 hours. … Request Permissions If you wish to reuse any or all (...) Paracetamol plus ibuprofen reduced fever in young children faster than paracetamol alone but not ibuprofen alone Paracetamol plus ibuprofen reduced fever in young children faster than paracetamol alone but not ibuprofen alone | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username

2009 Evidence-Based Medicine

3. Prevention of Opioid-Induced Nausea and Vomiting During Treatment of Moderate to Severe Acute Pain: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial Comparing CL-108 (Hydrocodone 7.5 mg/Acetaminophen 325 mg/Rapid-Release, Low-Dose Promethazine 12.5 mg) with Conventi (Abstract)

Prevention of Opioid-Induced Nausea and Vomiting During Treatment of Moderate to Severe Acute Pain: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial Comparing CL-108 (Hydrocodone 7.5 mg/Acetaminophen 325 mg/Rapid-Release, Low-Dose Promethazine 12.5 mg) with Conventi To evaluate the prevention of opioid-induced nausea and vomiting (OINV) and the relief of moderate to severe acute pain by CL-108, a novel drug combining a low-dose antiemetic (rapid-release promethazine 12.5 mg) with hydrocodone 7.5 mg (...) /acetaminophen 325 mg (HC/APAP) was used.This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled multidose study. After surgical extraction of two or more impacted third molar teeth (including at least one mandibular impaction), 466 patients with moderate to severe pain (measured on a categorical pain intensity scale [PI-CAT]) were randomized to CL-108, HC/APAP, or placebo. Over the next 24 hours, patients used the PI-CAT to assess pain at regular intervals whereas nausea, vomiting

2019 EvidenceUpdates

4. Treating fever in children: paracetamol or ibuprofen? Full Text available with Trip Pro

' or 'pyrexia' or ' temperature') and ('paracetamol' or 'acetaminophen') and 'ibuprofen'. Textbooks and reference lists were also searched. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review Studies that reported sufficient statistics to allow the calculation of effect size were eligible. The included studies were randomised controlled trials (RCTs), including double-blind RCTs, and controlled trials in which it was unclear whether they were randomised or not. Specific interventions (...) Treating fever in children: paracetamol or ibuprofen? Treating fever in children: paracetamol or ibuprofen? Treating fever in children: paracetamol or ibuprofen? Purssell E Authors' objectives To compare the effectiveness of paracetamol and ibuprofen as antipyretic medications for children. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Royal College of Nursing database were searched from 1970. The keywords used were ('children' or 'infants' or 'paediatric' or 'pediatric') and ('fever' or 'febrile

2002 DARE.

5. Mind the gap on acetaminophen/fevers pathophysiology and patient outcomes

reduction. S: And that’s about half a degree Fahrenheit. Jefferies S, et al. “Randomized controlled trial of the effect of regular paracetamol on influenza infection.” Respirology (2016) 21, 470-477.[LS2] Young P, et al. “Acetaminophen for fever in critically ill patients with suspected infectin.” NEJM Dec 3 2015. Greenberg RS, Chen H, Hasday JD. “Acetaminophen has limited antipyretic activity in criticall ill patients.” J Crit Care. 2010 June ; 25(2): 363e1-363e7. J: Thanks… But that can be a bit (...) of the antipyretic effect of intravenous paracetamol in patients admitted to hospital with infection”. It looked specifically at this. Tsaganos et al. “ibid” Br J Clin Pharacol. 2017 Apr;83(4)742-750. S: I quickly wanna highlight that this was using intravenous acetaminophen J: Grumble grumble (yeah we don’t have to include this) S: And it was a fairly small 80 person trial, but otherwise it’s pretty applicable. J: They looked at people over the age of 18, with new fevers over 38.5 degC S: That’s 101.3 deg F J

2019 Clinical Correlations

6. Acetaminophen vs. NSAIDs during COVID-19 pandemic

and clinical recommendations for COVID-19. We offer this common sense review about treating pain and fever for viral infections: Relieving fever and treating pain are comfort measures that can help people stay active and/or maintain good eating and sleeping patterns, but are NOT needed to shorten the duration of illness. Acetaminophen (generic and Tylenol, also the same as paracetamol and Panadol, etc.) can help some types of pain and can lower the temperature in fever. Follow package instructions and do (...) that ibuprofen or other NSAIDs are dangerous in COVID-19 infection, but for various reasons acetaminophen/paracetamol is generally the safest alternative to treat symptomatic fever or for mild pain. Thomas L. Perry MD, FRCPC Sick patients with COVID 19 pneumonia are being treated with fluid restriction. Adding NSAIDs would increase the risk of renal failure. Best to use acetaminophen or just nonpharmaceutical treatments like warm sponging and a fan. Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published

2020 Therapeutics Letter

7. Efficacy and safety of paracetamol and ibuprofen use for treatment of pain or fever in children under 2 years of age: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

Efficacy and safety of paracetamol and ibuprofen use for treatment of pain or fever in children under 2 years of age: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation

2019 PROSPERO

8. Ibuprofen Plus Acetaminophen Versus Ibuprofen Alone for Acute Low Back Pain: An Emergency Department-based Randomized Study (Abstract)

Ibuprofen Plus Acetaminophen Versus Ibuprofen Alone for Acute Low Back Pain: An Emergency Department-based Randomized Study Patients with low back pain (LBP) are often treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs are modestly effective for LBP, but many patients with LBP continue to suffer despite treatment with these medications. We compared pain and functional outcomes 1 week after emergency department (ED) discharge among patients randomized to a 1-week course (...) of ibuprofen plus acetaminophen versus ibuprofen plus placebo.This was a randomized, double-blind study conducted in two urban EDs. Patients presenting with acute, nontraumatic, nonradicular LBP of no more than 2 weeks' duration were eligible for enrollment immediately prior to discharge from an ED if they had a score > 5 on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), a 24-item validated instrument, indicating more than minimal functional impairment. All patients were given a standardized 10-minute

2020 EvidenceUpdates

9. Acetaminophen

of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com Top results for acetaminophen 1. Paracetamol ( acetaminophen ) for patent ductus arteriosus in preterm or low birth weight infants. BACKGROUND: In preterm newborns, the ductus arteriosus frequently fails to close and the infants require medical or surgical closure of the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). A PDA can be treated surgically; or medically with one of two prostaglandin inhibitors, indomethacin (...) of an echocardiographically diagnosed PDA in preterm or low birth weight infants. SEARCH METHODS: We used the standard search strategy 2018 2. 400 mg Ibuprofen/1000 mg Acetaminophen ( Paracetamol ) Is Suggested Effective Dosage for Ibuprofen/ Acetaminophen Combination Therapy in Postoperative Pain Reduction UTCAT2994, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title 400 mg Ibuprofen/1000 mg Acetaminophen ( Paracetamol ) Is Suggested Effective

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

10. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) for chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Paracetamol (acetaminophen) for chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents. Pain is a common feature of childhood and adolescence around the world, and for many young people, that pain is chronic. The World Health Organization guidelines for pharmacological treatments for children's persisting pain acknowledge that pain in children is a major public health concern of high significance in most parts of the world. While in the past, pain was largely dismissed and was frequently left (...) the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of paracetamol (acetaminophen) used to treat chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents aged between birth and 17 years, in any setting.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online, MEDLINE via Ovid, and Embase via Ovid from inception to 6 September 2016. We also searched the reference lists of retrieved studies and reviews, and searched online clinical trial registries.Randomised

2017 Cochrane

11. Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) is the short-term drug of choice for orthodontic pain

Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) is the short-term drug of choice for orthodontic pain UTCAT3387, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) is the short-term drug of choice for orthodontic pain. Clinical Question In patients experiencing pain from orthodontic tooth movement, what is the drug of choice to relieve pain without the inhibition of orthodontic tooth movement? Clinical Bottom Line (...) effects on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). Celecoxib inhibited OTM with 2-3 week use (p=0.03). Acetaminophen did not inhibit OTM except with use >1 month (p=0.004), while aspirin was found to inhibit orthodontic tooth movement (p=0.0008). #2) Correa et al/2017 Male Wistar Rats Systematic review of randomized trials Key results In the six studies subject to qualitative analysis, Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) did not interfere with orthodontic tooth movement. All of the other drugs tested, including

2019 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

12. A randomised controlled trial of paracetamol and ibuprofen with or without codeine or oxycodone as initial analgesia for adults with moderate pain from limb injury. (Abstract)

A randomised controlled trial of paracetamol and ibuprofen with or without codeine or oxycodone as initial analgesia for adults with moderate pain from limb injury. Compare pain relief from non-opioid, codeine and oxycodone analgesic regimens in adults with moderate pain from limb injury.Double-blind, randomised, controlled, non-inferiority trial. Three regimens of six tablets, each included 2 × 500 mg paracetamol and 2 × 200 mg ibuprofen with 2 × 100 mg thiamine (non-opioid), 2 × 30 mg codeine

2016 Emergency medicine Australasia Controlled trial quality: predicted high

13. 400 mg Ibuprofen/1000 mg Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) Is Suggested Effective Dosage for Ibuprofen/Acetaminophen Combination Therapy in Postoperative Pain Reduction

400 mg Ibuprofen/1000 mg Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) Is Suggested Effective Dosage for Ibuprofen/Acetaminophen Combination Therapy in Postoperative Pain Reduction UTCAT2994, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title 400 mg Ibuprofen/1000 mg Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) Is Suggested Effective Dosage for Ibuprofen/Acetaminophen Combination Therapy in Postoperative Pain Reduction Clinical Question In patients (...) receiving acetaminophen (paracetamol) and ibuprofen combination therapy, what is the effective dosage to relieve postoperative pain? Clinical Bottom Line For patients with postoperative pain, 400 mg ibuprofen/1000 mg acetaminophen (paracetamol) is the suggested effective dosage for short-term pain management. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Mehlisch/2010 234 patients post extraction

2016 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

14. Randomized comparative trial of efficacy of paracetamol, ibuprofen and paracetamol-ibuprofen combination for treatment of febrile children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Randomized comparative trial of efficacy of paracetamol, ibuprofen and paracetamol-ibuprofen combination for treatment of febrile children. Paracetamol and ibuprofen are widely used for fever in children as monotherapy and as combined therapy. None of the treatments is proven clearly superior to others. Hence, the study was planned to compare the efficacy of paracetamol, ibuprofen and paracetamol-ibuprofen combination for treatment of febrile children.This was an investigator blind, randomized (...) , comparative, parallel clinical trial conducted in 99 febrile children, 6 months to 12 years of age, allocated to three groups. First group received paracetamol 15 mg/kg, second group received ibuprofen 10 mg/kg and third group received both paracetamol and ibuprofen, all as a single dose by the oral route. Patients were followed-up at intervals of 1, 2, 3 and 4 h post dose by tympanic thermometry.Mean tympanic temperature after 4 h of drug administration was significantly lower in the combination group

2014 Perspectives in clinical research Controlled trial quality: uncertain

15. Alternating Acetaminophen and Ibuprofen versus Monotherapies in Improvements of Distress and Reducing Refractory Fever in Febrile Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial. (Abstract)

Alternating Acetaminophen and Ibuprofen versus Monotherapies in Improvements of Distress and Reducing Refractory Fever in Febrile Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial. No evidence can be found in the medical literature about the efficacy of alternating acetaminophen and ibuprofen treatment in children with refractory fever.Our objective was to assess the effect of alternating acetaminophen and ibuprofen therapy on distress and refractory fever compared with acetaminophen or ibuprofen (...) as monotherapy in febrile children.A total of 474 febrile children with axillary temperature ≥38.5 °C and fever history ≤3 days in a tertiary hospital were randomly assigned to receive either (1) alternating acetaminophen and ibuprofen (acetaminophen 10 mg/kg per dose with shortest interval of 4 h and ibuprofen 10 mg/kg per dose with shortest interval of 6 h and the shortest interval between acetaminophen and ibuprofen ≥2 h; n = 158), (2) acetaminophen monotherapy (10 mg/kg per dose with shortest interval

2017 Paediatric Drugs Controlled trial quality: predicted high

16. Sore throat: paracetamol is the best option

Sore throat: paracetamol is the best option Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Sore throat: paracetamol is the best option'', 1 December 2019 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Sore throat: paracetamol is the best option Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Sore throat: paracetamol is the best option Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs (...) ) appear to be somewhat more effective than paracetamol, but they expose patients to more serious side effects. Throat infections and pharyngitis are frequent; most often they are of viral origin and non-serious. These include sore throats that make swallowing difficult, which are soothed by sucking on hard candy, with or without sugar, and having hot or iced drinks. Paracetamol is often used to relieve sore throats, especially for self-medication. According to available randomised clinical trials

2019 Prescrire

17. Antipyretic Efficacy and Safety of Ibuprofen Versus Acetaminophen Suspension in Febrile Children: Results of 2 Randomized, Double-Blind, Single-Dose Studies. (Abstract)

Antipyretic Efficacy and Safety of Ibuprofen Versus Acetaminophen Suspension in Febrile Children: Results of 2 Randomized, Double-Blind, Single-Dose Studies. Two blinded single-dose studies randomized children 6 months to 11 years old with fever to receive ibuprofen (IBU) pediatric suspension 7.5 mg/kg or acetaminophen (APAP) suspension 10 to 15 mg/kg. The primary efficacy parameter was time-weighted sum of temperature differences (TWSTD) from baseline through 8 hours for each study. Secondary (...) efficacy outcomes supported significant advantages ( P < .05) of IBU over APAP. IBU pediatric suspension provided greater temperature reduction versus acetaminophen in febrile children, with a comparable safety profile.

2016 Clinical pediatrics Controlled trial quality: predicted high

18. Paracetamol: patients need to be more aware of the harms

Paracetamol: patients need to be more aware of the harms Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Paracetamol: patients need to be more aware of the harms'', 1 October 2019 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Paracetamol: patients need to be more aware of the harms Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Paracetamol: patients need to be more aware (...) of the harms In France, 20% of patients seem to be unaware that paracetamol is toxic at high doses, especially to the liver, and around 30% are unaware that alcohol aggravates this toxicity. Paracetamol is the first-choice analgesic drug for mild to moderate pain. Its adverse effects are mainly related to overdoses that expose people to severe liver damage and kidney failure. It is marketed alone or in combination with other substances under numerous trade names. This exposes the patient to unknowingly

2019 Prescrire

19. Does Combination Treatment With Ibuprofen and Acetaminophen Improve Fever Control?

Does Combination Treatment With Ibuprofen and Acetaminophen Improve Fever Control? SystematicReviewSnapshot TAKE-HOME MESSAGE Combination treatment with ibuprofen and acetaminophen is bene?cial over either agent alone for sustained fever reduction in children older than 6 months. METHODS DATA SOURCES The author searched MEDLINE (1948 to May 2011) and EMBASE (1980 to May 2011). Additional hand searches of references from the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines (...) Standards of Re- porting Trials (CONSORT) crite- ria to score the quality of the included trials and abstract the data. Does Combination Treatment With Ibuprofen and Acetaminophen Improve Fever Control? EBEM Commentator Rohith R. Malya, MD, MSc Department of Emergency Medicine University of Texas at Houston Houston, TX Results Seventrialswereretrievedandallmet the inclusion criteria and most of the itemsontheCONSORTchecklist.Dif- ferences in dosing interval limited di- rect comparison between any 2

2013 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

20. Revisiting established medicines: an overview of systematic reviews about ibuprofen and paracetamol for treating pain in children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Revisiting established medicines: an overview of systematic reviews about ibuprofen and paracetamol for treating pain in children. We explored how systematic reviews evaluated paracetamol and ibuprofen for treating pain in children, as these two nonopioid analgesics are well-established medicines included in most national essential medicines lists.We carried out an overview of systematic reviews (SRs) of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions (PROSPERO registration: 42016045367 (...) ). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Reviews of Effects (DARE) up to August 23, 2017. We used AMSTAR checklist to analyze methodological quality of included SRs.We found 17 SRs with 72 unique RCTs; the majority of those trials included under 100 children. Positive conclusive evidence was found in only one SR, regarding safety of paracetamol. Conclusions of other SRs for efficacy and safety of ibuprofen and paracetamol were inconclusive

2019 European Journal of Pain