Latest & greatest articles for ace inhibitors

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on ace inhibitors and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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ACE inhibitors

Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE) are principally used to reduce blood pressure. ACE inhibitors work by reducing the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. They have been used in a variety of conditions, including hypertension, acute myocardial infarctions, left ventricular systolic dysfunction and diabetic nephropathy

Ace inhibitors can be used alone to treat hypertension, or they can be used in combination with other drugs such as diuretics. Case studies and clinical trials on the medicine show that it can be used to prevent stroke or heart attacks. Common side effects of the drug including hypotension, dry cough, hyperkalaemia, headache, dizziness, fatigue, nausea, renal impairment and swelling in the lips and tongue.

ACE Inhibitors are widely used and feature extensively in the literature including clinical guidelines, systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials, case studies etc. These can easily be found via a search of the Trip Database. Medical research is vital to the development of new treatments and therapies for hypertension.

Top results for ace inhibitors

1. A comparison between B-type natriuretic peptide, global registry of acute coronary events (GRACE) score and their combination in ACS risk stratification (PubMed)

A comparison between B-type natriuretic peptide, global registry of acute coronary events (GRACE) score and their combination in ACS risk stratification 19321492 2009 10 30 2009 12 21 2016 11 22 1468-201X 95 22 2009 Nov Heart (British Cardiac Society) Heart A comparison between B-type natriuretic peptide, global registry of acute coronary events (GRACE) score and their combination in ACS risk stratification. 1836-42 10.1136/hrt.2008.160234 In acute coronary syndrome (ACS), both the Global (...) Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) score and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) predict cardiovascular events. However, it is unknown how BNP compares with GRACE and how their combination performs in ACS. The authors recruited 449 consecutive ACS patients and measured admission GRACE score and bedside BNP levels. The main outcome measure was all-cause mortality, readmission with ACS or congestive heart failure (defined as a cardiovascular event) at 10 months from presentation. Of the 449 patients

2009 EvidenceUpdates