Latest & greatest articles for Vitiligo

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Top results for Vitiligo

1. Oral minipulse therapy in vitiligo: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Oral minipulse therapy in vitiligo: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2019 PROSPERO

2. Vitiligo: Patient stories, self-esteem, and the psychological burden of disease (PubMed)

Vitiligo: Patient stories, self-esteem, and the psychological burden of disease Vitiligo is a relatively common disorder that is characterized by depigmented patches of skin. Multiple studies characterize the overwhelming psychological burden that is experienced by many patients around the globe. This review examines personal patient stories and the impacts of age, culture, sex, race, and ethnicity in relationship to altered self-esteem and quality of life in patients who live with vitiligo.

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2018 International journal of women's dermatology

3. Vitiligo

Vitiligo Vitiligo - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Vitiligo Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: July 2018 Summary Common acquired multi-factorial skin disease exhibiting progressive depigmentation of the epidermis in circumscribed areas, typically without erythema or scaling. Multiple auto-immune disorders may be associated with vitiligo, most commonly auto-immune thyroiditis. In light-skinned (...) to induce repigmentation, treatments such as UV-B light, topical immunosuppressants, and combination approaches using phototherapy can provide significant improvement in most cases. Definition Vitiligo is an acquired loss of melanocytes in circumscribed areas of the epidermis, resulting in complete depigmentation of affected skin. The extent of the disease ranges from limited, focal disease to almost complete (universal) pigment loss. History and exam presence of risk factors acral and periorificial

2018 BMJ Best Practice

4. Tacrolimus for the Treatment of Adults with Psoriasis or Vitiligo: A Review of the Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness

Tacrolimus for the Treatment of Adults with Psoriasis or Vitiligo: A Review of the Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Tacrolimus for the Treatment of Adults with Psoriasis or Vitiligo: A Review of the Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Tacrolimus for the Treatment of Adults with Psoriasis or Vitiligo: A Review of the Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Tacrolimus for the Treatment of Adults with Psoriasis or Vitiligo: A Review of the Clinical and Cost (...) -Effectiveness Published on: October 11, 2017 Project Number: RC0920-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of tacrolimus for the treatment of adults with psoriasis? What is the clinical effectiveness of tacrolimus for the treatment of adults with vitiligo? What is the cost-effectiveness of tacrolimus for the treatment of adults with psoriasis? What is the cost-effectiveness of tacrolimus

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

6. Interventions for Vitiligo. (PubMed)

Interventions for Vitiligo. Which interventions are associated with highest efficacy and fewest adverse events for treating vitiligo?Combination therapies, particularly those involving some form of light (ie, narrowband UV-B) were associated with more improved repigmentation than monotherapies. There was limited evidence to support the association of UV-A alone and UV-B alone with repigmentation for vitiligo. There was moderate evidence to support the association of UV-A and UV-B, when used (...) in combination with psoralens, topical corticosteroids, vitamin D analogues, fluorouracil, azathioprine, and oral prednisolone with improved outcomes for vitiligo. However, combination therapies were associated with more adverse effects.

2016 JAMA

7. Combination therapy of orally administered glycyrrhizin and UVB improved active-stage generalized vitiligo. (PubMed)

Combination therapy of orally administered glycyrrhizin and UVB improved active-stage generalized vitiligo. Glycyrrhizin has been used clinically for several years due to its beneficial effect on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced allergic diseases, alopecia areata and psoriasis. In this study, glycyrrhizin, ultraviolet B light (UVB) or a combination of both were used to treat active-stage generalized vitiligo. One hundred and forty-four patients between the ages of 3 and 48 years were divided (...) into three groups: group A received oral compound glycyrrhizin (OCG); group B received UVB applications twice weekly, and group C received OCG+UVB. Follow-ups were performed at 2, 4, and 6 months after the treatment was initiated. The Vitiligo Area Scoring Index (VASI) and the Vitiligo Disease Activity (VIDA) instrument were used to assess the affected body surface, at each follow-up. Results showed that 77.1, 75.0 and 87.5% in groups A, B and C, respectively, presented repigmentation of lesions

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2016 Brazilian journal of medical and biological research = Revista brasileira de pesquisas medicas e biologicas Controlled trial quality: uncertain

8. Liver X Receptor-α polymorphisms (rs11039155 and rs2279238) are associated with susceptibility to vitiligo (PubMed)

Liver X Receptor-α polymorphisms (rs11039155 and rs2279238) are associated with susceptibility to vitiligo Vitiligo is a complex genetic skin depigmentation disorder caused by the destruction of melanocyte from the lesional site. Liver X Receptor-α (LXR-α) expression is upregulated in the melanocytes from perilesional skin as compared to the normal skin of vitiligo patient suggesting its involvement in vitiligo pathogenesis. Polymorphisms in LXR-α have been associated with several diseases (...) including cardiovascular disease, polycystic ovary syndrome, cancer, inflammatory bowel disease and diabetes. In this study, for the first time, we have investigated the association of LXR-α gene polymorphisms and risk of vitiligo. Sixty six vitiligo patients and 75 matched healthy control subjects who did not have any history of vitiligo or any other autoimmune disorder were recruited. The DNA isolated from patients and healthy controls was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment

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2016 Meta gene

9. Vitiligo

Vitiligo Vitiligo - NICE CKS Share Vitiligo: Summary Vitiligo is an acquired, chronic depigmentation disorder characterized by white patches on the skin. It is classified according to its distribution and extent. Non-segmental vitiligo is the more common form, accounting for 85–90% of people with vitiligo. It has a non-dermatomal distribution and is usually generalized and symmetrical. Segmental vitiligo is less common than non-segmental vitiligo and affects 30% of children with vitiligo (...) . It usually has a dermatomal distribution and is typically unilateral and limited to one segment. Vitiligo is caused by the loss of functioning melanocytes (pigment cells) in the skin, resulting in patches of white skin or hair. Genetic and environmental factors are both thought to be important. The prevalence of vitiligo in the worldwide population is approximately 0.5–2%. The mean age of onset is 20 years of age. Complications include psychosocial problems (including low self-esteem and relationship

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

10. Vitiligo. (PubMed)

Vitiligo. Vitiligo, an acquired pigmentary disorder of unknown origin, is the most frequent cause of depigmentation worldwide, with an estimated prevalence of 1%. The disorder can be psychologically devastating and stigmatising, especially in dark skinned individuals. Vitiligo is clinically characterised by the development of white macules due to the loss of functioning melanocytes in the skin or hair, or both. Two forms of the disease are well recognised: segmental and non-segmental vitiligo (...) (the commonest form). To distinguish between these two forms is of prime importance because therapeutic options and prognosis are quite different. The importance of early treatment and understanding of the profound psychosocial effect of vitiligo will be emphasised throughout this Seminar. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

2015 Lancet

11. Variant of TYR and Autoimmunity Susceptibility Loci in Generalized Vitiligo. (PubMed)

Variant of TYR and Autoimmunity Susceptibility Loci in Generalized Vitiligo. Generalized vitiligo is an autoimmune disease characterized by melanocyte loss, which results in patchy depigmentation of skin and hair, and is associated with an elevated risk of other autoimmune diseases.To identify generalized vitiligo susceptibility loci, we conducted a genomewide association study. We genotyped 579,146 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1514 patients with generalized vitiligo who were (...) of European-derived white (CEU) ancestry and compared the genotypes with publicly available control genotypes from 2813 CEU persons. We then tested 50 SNPs in two replication sets, one comprising 677 independent CEU patients and 1106 CEU controls and the other comprising 183 CEU simplex trios with generalized vitiligo and 332 CEU multiplex families.We detected significant associations between generalized vitiligo and SNPs at several loci previously associated with other autoimmune diseases. These included

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2010 NEJM

12. Ultraviolet B phototherapy for vitiligo

Ultraviolet B phototherapy for vitiligo Ultraviolet B phototherapy for vitiligo Ultraviolet B phototherapy for vitiligo Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Report may be purchased from Citation Ultraviolet B phototherapy for vitiligo . Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. 2010 Authors' objectives The objective of ultraviolet B (UVB) phototherapy for vitiligo (...) is repigmentation of depigmented lesions, thereby promoting the resolution of existing vitiligo lesions. The mechanism of action of UVB phototherapy is not clear, but it is thought that UVB light has an inhibitory effect on cytotoxic T lymphocytes and stimulates the release of melanocytes involved in melanocyte migration and proliferation. Project page URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Humans; Phototherapy; Ultraviolet Therapy; Vitiligo Language Published English Country of organisation

2010 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

13. The Efficacy of Topical Immunomodulators in Treating Vitiligo

The Efficacy of Topical Immunomodulators in Treating Vitiligo "The Efficacy of Topical Immunomodulators in Treating Vitiligo" by Mahkameh Mehdianrad < > > > > > Title Author Date of Graduation 8-15-2009 Degree Type Capstone Project Degree Name Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies First Advisor James Ferguson, PA-C Second Advisor Rob Rosenow PharmD, OD Third Advisor Annjanette Sommers MS, PA-C Rights This work is licensed under a . Abstract Background: Vitiligo is a cutaneous (...) disorder of pigmentation with 1% to 2% incidence. People affected by vitiligo have a vast reduction in quality of life caused by the color contrast between healthy pigmented skin and depigmented vitiligous patch. Hypothesis: Topical Immunomodulators are an effective treatment for repigmentation of vitiligo patches. Study Design: A systematic review of literature. Methods: A literature search was performed using the National Library of Medicine (MEDLINE), EMBASE, CINAHL, International Pharmaceutical

2009 Pacific University EBM Capstone Project

14. Guidelines for the management and diagnosis of vitiligo

Guidelines for the management and diagnosis of vitiligo GUIDELINES BJD British Journal of Dermatology Guideline for the diagnosis and management of vitiligo D.J. Gawkrodger, A.D. Ormerod, L. Shaw, I. Mauri-Sole, M.E. Whitton,* M.J. Watts, A.V. Anstey, J. Ingham and K. Young British Association of Dermatologists, 4 Fitzroy Square, London W1T 5HQ, U.K. *Vitiligo Society, 125 Kennington Road, London SE11 6SF, U.K. Cochrane Skin Group, Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, King’s Meadow Campus (...) , University of Nottingham NG7 2NR, U.K. Royal College of Physicians, St Andrew’s Place, Regent’s Park, London NW1 4LE, U.K. Correspondence D.J. Gawkrodger, Department of Dermatology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Shef?eld S10 2JF, U.K. E-mail: david.gawkrodger@sth.nhs.uk Accepted for publication 11 August 2008 Key words diagnosis, guidelines, treatment, vitiligo Con?icts of interest No member of the Guideline Development Group has declared any interest in companies whose products are named in the guideline

2008 British Association of Dermatologists

15. NALP1 in vitiligo-associated multiple autoimmune disease. (PubMed)

NALP1 in vitiligo-associated multiple autoimmune disease. Autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases involve interactions between genetic risk factors and environmental triggers. We searched for a gene on chromosome 17p13 that contributes to a group of epidemiologically associated autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. The group includes various combinations of generalized vitiligo, autoimmune thyroid disease, latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, pernicious (...) resulted in our identifying as a candidate gene NALP1, which encodes NACHT leucine-rich-repeat protein 1, a regulator of the innate immune system. Fine-scale association mapping with the use of DNA from affected families and additional SNPs in and around NALP1 showed an association of specific variants with vitiligo alone, with an extended autoimmune and autoinflammatory disease phenotype, or with both. Conditional logistic-regression analysis of NALP1 SNPs indicated that at least two variants

2007 NEJM

16. Interventions for vitiligo. (PubMed)

Interventions for vitiligo. Around 1% of the world's population has vitiligo, which causes a loss of skin colour in patches. The methods currently available to treat vitiligo are largely unsatisfactory and vary widely between cultures and within health systems.To assess the effects of interventions used to manage vitiligo.We searched the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED and other databases (last searched (...) generally had low numbers of participants and only RCTs of repigmentation and not other methods of managing vitiligo were able to be included. In one study, potent topical steroids resulted in better repigmentation than placebo and they were also better than oral psoralens plus sunlight in another study (RR 4.70 95% CI 1.14 to 19.39) although their long-term use is limited by adverse effects. Two studies suggested that topical calcipotriol enhanced repigmentation rates from PUVAsol and PUVA when

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2006 Cochrane

17. Nonsurgical repigmentation therapies in vitiligo: meta-analysis of the literature

Nonsurgical repigmentation therapies in vitiligo: meta-analysis of the literature Nonsurgical repigmentation therapies in vitiligo: meta-analysis of the literature Nonsurgical repigmentation therapies in vitiligo: meta-analysis of the literature Njoo M D, Spuls P I, Bos J D, Westerhof W, Bossuyt P M Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness and safety of nonsurgical repigmentation therapies in localised and generalised vitiligo by means of a meta-analysis. Searching MEDLINE and EMBASE (...) were searched from January 1966 to December 1997. The main keywords (including analogs and derivatives) used were: 'vitiligo', 'phototherapy', 'PUVA therapy', 'ultraviolet therapy', 'phenylalanine', 'khellin', 'glucocorticosteroids synthetic' and 'anti-inflammatory agents'. No language restrictions were applied. Other sources searched were abstract books of symposia and congresses, theses, textbooks, monographs, reviews, editorials, letters to the editor, free or rapid communications

1998 DARE.