Latest & greatest articles for Vasectomy

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Top results for Vasectomy

1. Interim Clinical Commissioning Policy – Vasectomy

Interim Clinical Commissioning Policy – Vasectomy NHS England » Interim Clinical Commissioning Policy – Vasectomy Search Search Menu Interim Clinical Commissioning Policy – Vasectomy Document first published: 12 August 2019 Page updated: 12 August 2019 Topic: , , Publication type: This policy aims to ensure that male Armed Forces patients are able to access NHS vasectomy services wherever they live or receive their services in England. Document PDF 178 KB 17 pages

2019 NHS England

2. Advantages of the no-scalpel vasectomy technique

Advantages of the no-scalpel vasectomy technique Advantages of the no-scalpel vasectomy technique Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Advantages of the no-scalpel vasectomy technique View/ Open Date 2012-06 Format Metadata Abstract The no-scalpel vasectomy (NSV) technique should be used instead (...) of the standard incisional method. (Strength of Recommendation: A, based on systematic reviews, mixed-quality randomized controlled trials [RCTs], cohort studies, and case-control series.) The NSV technique is associated with fewer complications, produces less perioperative and postoperative pain, results in quicker recovery, takes less time to perform, and is as effective as standard incisional vasectomy. URI Citation American Family Physician 85 (12) 2012. Collections hosted by hosted by

2019 Clinical Inquiries

3. Advantages of the no-scalpel vasectomy technique

Advantages of the no-scalpel vasectomy technique Advantages of the no-scalpel vasectomy technique Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Advantages of the no-scalpel vasectomy technique View/ Open Date 2012-06 Format Metadata Abstract The no-scalpel vasectomy (NSV) technique should be used instead (...) of the standard incisional method. (Strength of Recommendation: A, based on systematic reviews, mixed-quality randomized controlled trials [RCTs], cohort studies, and case-control series.) The NSV technique is associated with fewer complications, produces less perioperative and postoperative pain, results in quicker recovery, takes less time to perform, and is as effective as standard incisional vasectomy. URI Citation American Family Physician 85 (12) 2012. Collections hosted by hosted by

2019 Clinical Inquiries

4. Vasectomy and Prostate Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Full Text available with Trip Pro

Vasectomy and Prostate Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Purpose Vasectomy is a commonly used form of male sterilization, and some studies have suggested that it may be associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, including more aggressive forms of the disease. We investigated the prospective association of vasectomy with prostate cancer in a large European cohort, with a focus on high-grade and advanced-stage tumors, and death due (...) to prostate cancer. Patients and Methods A total of 84,753 men from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), aged 35 to 79 years, provided information on vasectomy status (15% with vasectomy) at recruitment and were followed for incidence of prostate cancer and death. We estimated the association of vasectomy with prostate cancer risk overall, by tumor subtype, and for death due to prostate cancer, using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. Results During

2017 EvidenceUpdates

6. Vasectomy and risk of prostate cancer: population based matched cohort study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Vasectomy and risk of prostate cancer: population based matched cohort study.  To determine the association between vasectomy and prostate cancer, adjusting for measures of health seeking behaviour. Population based matched cohort study. Multiple validated healthcare databases in Ontario, Canada, 1994-2012. 326 607 men aged 20 to 65 who had undergone vasectomy were identified through physician billing codes and matched 1:1 on age (within two years), year of cohort entry, comorbidity score (...) , and geographical region to men who did not undergo a vasectomy. The primary outcome was incident prostate cancer. Secondary outcomes were prostate cancer related grade, stage, and mortality. 3462 incident cases of prostate cancer were identified after a median follow-up of 10.9 years: 1843 (53.2%) in the vasectomy group and 1619 (46.8%) in the non-vasectomy group. In unadjusted analysis, vasectomy was associated with a slightly increased risk of incident prostate cancer (hazard ratio 1.13, 95% confidence

2016 BMJ

7. CUA guideline: Vasectomy

CUA guideline: Vasectomy CUAJ • July-August 2016 • Volume 10, Issues 7-8 © 2016 Canadian Urological Association E274 GUIDELINE CUA guideline: Vasectomy Cite as: Can Urol Assoc J 2016;10(7-8):E274-8. http://dx.doi.org/10.5489/cuaj.4017 Published online August 16, 2016 Introduction Vasectomy is a safe and effective method of birth control. Although it is a simple elective procedure, vasectomy is associated with potential minor and major complications. The early failure rate of vasectomy (presence (...) of motile sperm in the ejaculate at 3–6 months post-vasectomy) is in the range of 0.3–9% and the late failure rate is in the range of 0.04–0.08%. The no-scalpel vasectomy technique is associ- ated with a lower risk of early postoperative complications and the use of cautery or fascial interposition will reduce the risk of contraceptive failure. As such, detailed preoperative counselling and careful assessment of the post-vasectomy ejaculate (for presence of sperm) is imperative. Failure to provide

2016 Canadian Urological Association

8. Vasectomy

Vasectomy Vasectomy Guideline - American Urological Association advertisement Toggle navigation About Us About the AUA Membership AUA Governance Industry Relations Education AUAUniversity Education Products & Resources Normal Histology and Important Histo-anatomic Structures Urinary Bladder Prostate Kidney Renovascular Diseases Andrenal Gland Testis Paratesticular Tumors Penis Retroperitoneum Cytology Online Learning For Medical Students Exams/LLL/Certifications Exam Prep Research Research (...) and Reporting Patient Education Vasectomy Guideline (2015) Published 2012; Amended 2015 The purpose of this clinical guideline is to provide guidance to clinicians who offer vasectomy services. This guidance covers pre-operative evaluation and consultation of prospective vasectomy patients; techniques for local anesthesia, isolation of the vas deferens and occlusion of the vas deferens during vasectomy; post-operative follow-up; post-vasectomy semen analysis (PVSA) and potential complications

2015 American Urological Association

9. Scalpel versus no-scalpel incision for vasectomy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Scalpel versus no-scalpel incision for vasectomy. Currently, the two most common surgical techniques for approaching the vas during vasectomy are the incisional method and the no-scalpel technique. Whereas the conventional incisional technique involves the use of a scalpel to make one or two incisions, the no-scalpel technique uses a sharp-pointed, forceps-like instrument to puncture the skin. The no-scalpel technique aims to reduce adverse events, especially bleeding, bruising, hematoma (...) with the no-scalpel technique (OR 0.23; 95% CI 0.15 to 0.36). Operations using the no-scalpel approach were faster and had a quicker resumption of sexual activity. The smaller study did not find these differences; however, the study could have failed to detect differences due to a small sample size as well as a high loss to follow up. Neither trial found differences in vasectomy effectiveness between the two approaches to the vas.The no-scalpel approach to the vas resulted in less bleeding, hematoma, infection

2014 Cochrane

10. Vasectomy occlusion techniques for male sterilization. (Abstract)

Vasectomy occlusion techniques for male sterilization. Vasectomy is an increasingly popular and effective family planning method. A variety of vasectomy techniques are used worldwide, including vas occlusion techniques (excision and ligation, thermal or electrocautery, and mechanical and chemical occlusion methods), as well as vasectomy with vas irrigation or with fascial interposition. Vasectomy guidelines largely rely on information from observational studies. Ideally, the choice of vasectomy (...) techniques should be based on the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs).The objective of this review was to compare the effectiveness, safety, acceptability and costs of vasectomy techniques for male sterilization.In February 2014, we updated the searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, POPLINE and LILACS. We looked for recent clinical trials in ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. Previous searches also included EMBASE. For the initial review, we searched

2014 Cochrane

11. Vasectomy occlusion techniques for male sterilization. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Vasectomy occlusion techniques for male sterilization. Vasectomy is an increasingly popular and effective family planning method. A variety of vasectomy techniques are used worldwide, including various vas occlusion techniques (excision and ligation, thermal or electrocautery, and mechanical and chemical occlusion methods), as well as vasectomy with vas irrigation or with fascial interposition. Vasectomy guidelines largely rely on information from observational studies. Ideally, the choice (...) of vasectomy techniques should be based on the best available evidence from randomized controlled trials.The objective of this review was to compare the effectiveness, safety, acceptability and costs of vasectomy techniques for male sterilization.We searched the computerized databases of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, POPLINE and LILACS. In addition, we searched the reference lists of relevant articles and book chapters.We included randomized controlled trials comparing vasectomy techniques.We assessed all

2007 Cochrane

12. Scalpel versus no-scalpel incision for vasectomy. (Abstract)

Scalpel versus no-scalpel incision for vasectomy. Currently, the two most common surgical techniques for approaching the vas during vasectomy are the incisional method and the no-scalpel technique. Whereas the conventional incisional technique involves the use of a scalpel to make one or two incisions, the no-scalpel technique uses a sharp-pointed, forceps-like instrument to puncture the skin. The no-scalpel technique aims to reduce adverse events, especially bleeding, bruising, hematoma (...) to detect differences due to a small sample size as well as a high loss to follow up. Neither trial found differences in vasectomy effectiveness between the two approaches to the vas.The no-scalpel approach to the vas resulted in less bleeding, hematoma, infection, and pain as well as a shorter operation time than the traditional incision technique. No difference in effectiveness was found between the two approaches.

2007 Cochrane

13. Markov modeling of vasectomy reversal and ART for infertility: how do obstructive interval and female partner age influence cost effectiveness?

Markov modeling of vasectomy reversal and ART for infertility: how do obstructive interval and female partner age influence cost effectiveness? Markov modeling of vasectomy reversal and ART for infertility: how do obstructive interval and female partner age influence cost effectiveness? Markov modeling of vasectomy reversal and ART for infertility: how do obstructive interval and female partner age influence cost effectiveness? Hsieh M H, Meng M V, Turek P J Record Status This is a critical (...) abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary The study assessed the impact of obstructive interval and female partner age on fertility and the cost-effectiveness of vasectomy reversal versus assisted reproductive technology as treatment options for infertile men seeking

2007 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

14. Scalpel versus no-scalpel incision for vasectomy. (Abstract)

Scalpel versus no-scalpel incision for vasectomy. Currently, the two most common surgical techniques for approaching the vas during vasectomy are the incisional method and the no-scalpel technique. Whereas the conventional incisional technique involves the use of a scalpel to make one or two incisions, the no-scalpel technique uses a sharp-pointed, forceps-like instrument to puncture the skin. The no-scalpel technique aims to reduce adverse events, especially bleeding, bruising, hematoma (...) , infection and pain and to shorten the operating time.The objective of this review was to compare the effectiveness, safety, and acceptability of the incisional versus no-scalpel vasectomy approach to the vas.We searched the computerized databases of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, POPLINE and LILACS in May 2006. In addition, we searched the reference lists of relevant articles and book chapters.Randomized controlled trials and controlled clinical trials were included in this review. No language restrictions

2006 Cochrane

15. Vasectomy occlusion techniques for male sterilization. (Abstract)

Vasectomy occlusion techniques for male sterilization. Vasectomy is an increasingly popular and effective family planning method. A variety of vasectomy techniques are used worldwide including various vas occlusion techniques (excision and ligation, thermal or electrocautery, and mechanical and chemical occlusion methods), vas irrigation and fascial interposition. Vasectomy guidelines largely rely on information from observational studies. Ideally, the choice of vasectomy techniques should (...) be based on the best available evidence from randomized controlled trials.The objective of this review was to compare the effectiveness, safety, acceptability and costs of vasectomy techniques for male sterilization.We searched the computerized databases the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Popline and LILACS. In addition, we searched the reference lists of relevant articles and book chapters.We included randomized controlled trials and controlled clinical

2004 Cochrane

16. Vasectomy surgical techniques: a systematic review

Vasectomy surgical techniques: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2004 DARE.

17. Post-vasectomy testing to confirm sterility: a systematic review

Post-vasectomy testing to confirm sterility: a systematic review Post-vasectomy testing to confirm sterility: a systematic review Post-vasectomy testing to confirm sterility: a systematic review Griffin T T et al Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Griffin T T et al. Post-vasectomy testing to confirm sterility: a systematic (...) review. Stepney, SA: Australian Safety and Efficacy Register of New Interventional Procedures - Surgical (ASERNIP-S) 2003: 177 Authors' objectives To make evidence-based recommendations on the appropriate protocol for postvasectomy testing to confirm sterility, on the basis of a systematic assessment of the peer reviewed literature. Authors' conclusions The evidence presented in this review supports a post-vasectomy testing protocol with only one test (showing azoospermia) at three months post

2003 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

18. Vasectomy and risk of prostate cancer. (Abstract)

Vasectomy and risk of prostate cancer. Vasectomy is a common method of contraception, but concern exists about a reported association with risk of prostate cancer.To examine whether vasectomy increases risk of prostate cancer.National population-based case-control study of 923 new cases of prostate cancer among men aged 40 to 74 years from the New Zealand Cancer Registry who were on the general electoral roll. Controls (n = 1224) were randomly selected from the general electoral roll (...) , with frequency matching to cases in 5-year age groups. Cases (3-15 months after diagnosis) and controls were interviewed by telephone between January 1997 and November 1999.Relative risk (RR) of prostate cancer for men who had had a vasectomy vs those who had not.There was no association between prostate cancer and vasectomy (RR, 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75-1.14) nor with time since vasectomy (RR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.68-1.23 for > or = 25 years since vasectomy). Adjustment for social class

2002 JAMA

19. Patient characteristics associated with vasectomy reversal

Patient characteristics associated with vasectomy reversal Patient characteristics associated with vasectomy reversal Patient characteristics associated with vasectomy reversal Potts J M, Pasqualotto F F, Nelson D, Thomas A J, Agarwal A Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability (...) of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Alternative methods for achieving pregnancy after vasectomy. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Patients who requested vasectomy reversal. Setting Hospital. This study was carried out at The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. Dates to which data relate Effectiveness data were based on a retrospective review of medical charts relating to the period 1990-1997 and from

1999 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

20. The association between vasectomy and prostate cancer: a systematic review of the literature

The association between vasectomy and prostate cancer: a systematic review of the literature The association between vasectomy and prostate cancer: a systematic review of the literature The association between vasectomy and prostate cancer: a systematic review of the literature Bernal-Delgado E, Latour-Perez J, Pradas-Arnal F, Gomez-Lopez L I Authors' objectives To evaluate the possible association between vasectomy and prostate cancer. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and IME (Spanish Index Medicus (...) ) were searched between 1985 and 1996 using the keywords 'vasectomy', 'prostate', 'prostatic', and 'cancer'. This was followed by manual retrieval using primary sources. The database of the Spanish network of Research Transfer Offices (DATRI) was also searched. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review Observational studies of case-control or cohort design, which mentioned an association between vasectomy and prostate cancer, were included. In the case of duplicate reports

1998 DARE.