Latest & greatest articles for Uric Acid

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Top results for Uric Acid

1. Uric acid and risk of heart failure mortality: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

Uric acid and risk of heart failure mortality: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2019 PROSPERO

2. The effects of folic acid supplementation on serum uric acid: findings from a systematic review and meta-analysis

The effects of folic acid supplementation on serum uric acid: findings from a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated

2019 PROSPERO

3. Impact of bariatric surgery on serum uric acid levels and the incidence of gout - a meta-analysis

Impact of bariatric surgery on serum uric acid levels and the incidence of gout - a meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external

2019 PROSPERO

4. Effect of diet on uric acid and cardiovascular health in patients with hyperuricemia or gout: a systematic review

Effect of diet on uric acid and cardiovascular health in patients with hyperuricemia or gout: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated

2019 PROSPERO

5. Can serum uric acid be used as a biomarker for COPD? A meta-analysis

Can serum uric acid be used as a biomarker for COPD? A meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation

2019 PROSPERO

6. The association of serum uric acid levels in psoriasis patients: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

The association of serum uric acid levels in psoriasis patients: a systematic review and network meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2019 PROSPERO

7. The effect of uric acid-lowering therapy on kidney function among patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

The effect of uric acid-lowering therapy on kidney function among patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content

2019 PROSPERO

8. Relationship of Interleukin-1β Blockade With Incident Gout and Serum Uric Acid Levels: Exploratory Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial. (PubMed)

Relationship of Interleukin-1β Blockade With Incident Gout and Serum Uric Acid Levels: Exploratory Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial. Although studies have shown that interleukin-1β (IL-1β) inhibitors can shorten gout attacks, whether they can prevent gout attacks is unclear.To examine the relationship among canakinumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting IL-1β; serum uric acid levels; and the incidence of gout attacks.Secondary exploratory analysis of a randomized controlled trial (...) . (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01327846).Many clinical sites in 39 countries.10 059 patients with a prior myocardial infarction and a high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) level of at least 19.1 nmol/L.Random allocation to canakinumab (50 mg, 150 mg, or 300 mg) versus placebo, administered subcutaneously every 3 months.Rates of gout attacks were compared across patients with different baseline concentrations of serum uric acid (≤404.5 µmol/L, 404.6 to 535.3 µmol/L, and ≥535.4 µmol/L) and in different intervention

2018 Annals of Internal Medicine

9. Uric acid lowering therapies for preventing or delaying the progression of chronic kidney disease. (PubMed)

Uric acid lowering therapies for preventing or delaying the progression of chronic kidney disease. Non-randomised data have shown a link between hyperuricaemia and the progression or development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). If this is correct, urate lowering therapy might form an important part of chronic kidney disease care, reducing risks for cardiovascular outcomes and end-stage kidney disease.This review aims to study the benefits and harms of uric acid lowering therapy (...) included in the review. Risk of bias was unclear for the majority of domains in each study.Uric acid lowering therapy may make little or no difference in death at six months (2 studies, 498 participants: RR 1.66, 95% CI 0.61 to 4.48) or two years (2 studies, 220 participants): RR 0.13, 95% CI 0.02 to 1.06) (low certainty evidence). Uric acid lowering therapy may make little of no difference (low certainty evidence) in the incidence of ESKD at one or two years. Kidney function may be improved by uric

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2017 Cochrane

10. High uric acid level predicts left atrial thrombus or spontaneous echo contrast detected by transesophageal echocardiography: Meta-analysis and systematic review. (PubMed)

High uric acid level predicts left atrial thrombus or spontaneous echo contrast detected by transesophageal echocardiography: Meta-analysis and systematic review. Recent observational studies have suggested that the patients with hyperuricemia have a higher risk of having left atrial thrombus (LATH) or left atrial spontaneous echo contrast (LASEC) by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), while the ultimate predictive value of a high uric acid (UA) level on LATH/LASEC remained obscure.We

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2017 Chronic diseases and translational medicine

11. Elevation of serum uric acid and incidence of type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis. (PubMed)

Elevation of serum uric acid and incidence of type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Recently, several cohort studies suggested a positive relationship between serum uric acid (SUA) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which is inconsistent with the results of functional research. Our aim was to further evaluate this correlation by conducting a systematic review.Computerized literature searches of the Medline database, EMBASE database, and PubMed were used to evaluate

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2017 Chronic diseases and translational medicine

12. Serum uric acid levels and multiple health outcomes: umbrella review of evidence from observational studies, randomised controlled trials, and Mendelian randomisation studies. (PubMed)

Serum uric acid levels and multiple health outcomes: umbrella review of evidence from observational studies, randomised controlled trials, and Mendelian randomisation studies. Objective To map the diverse health outcomes associated with serum uric acid (SUA) levels.Design Umbrella review.Data sources Medline, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and screening of citations and references.Eligibility criteria Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of observational studies that examined

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2017 BMJ

13. On admission serum sodium and uric acid levels predict 30 day rehospitalization or death in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (PubMed)

On admission serum sodium and uric acid levels predict 30 day rehospitalization or death in patients with acute decompensated heart failure A considerable proportion of hospitalized patients for acute decompensated heart failure will be readmitted or die in short-term follow-up. In the present study, we aimed to assess the role of admission sodium (Na) and uric acid (UA) levels in the prediction of 30 day post-discharge heart failure readmission or all-cause mortality in advanced heart failure

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2017 ESC heart failure

14. Multiple Uric Acid Bladder Stones: Clinical Presentation and Endoscopic Management (PubMed)

Multiple Uric Acid Bladder Stones: Clinical Presentation and Endoscopic Management Background: Bladder urinary calculi occur in 3%-8% of men with bladder outlet obstruction, and although most of them are composed of calcium, in a few cases uric acid bladder stones are diagnosed. Case Presentation: We present clinical images and therapeutic management of a 65-year-old diabetic man with significant prostate enlargement and >30 bladder stones, the largest being 17 mm. Despite the large stone (...) burden, the patient was managed by cystolithotripsy. Remarkably, stone composition analysis revealed 100% uric acid stone. Intraoperative and postoperative course were uneventfully. Conclusion: Uric acid bladder stone pathogenesis seems to be multifactorial with local and systemic factors contributing in different manners and even large stone burdens may be cystoscopically managed.

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2017 Journal of endourology case reports

15. Uric acid predicts mortality and ischaemic stroke in subjects with diastolic dysfunction: the Tromsø Study 1994–2013 (PubMed)

Uric acid predicts mortality and ischaemic stroke in subjects with diastolic dysfunction: the Tromsø Study 1994–2013 To investigate whether serum uric acid predicts adverse outcomes in persons with indices of diastolic dysfunction in a general population.We performed a prospective cohort study among 1460 women and 1480 men from 1994 to 2013. Endpoints were all-cause mortality, incident myocardial infarction, and incident ischaemic stroke. We stratified the analyses by echocardiographic (...) markers of diastolic dysfunction, and uric acid was the independent variable of interest. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated per 59 μmol/L increase in baseline uric acid. Multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazards models showed that uric acid predicted all-cause mortality in subjects with E/A ratio <0.75 (HR 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.25) or E/A ratio >1.5 (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.09-2.09, P for interaction between E/A ratio category and uric acid = 0.02). Elevated uric acid increased

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2017 ESC heart failure

16. Serum and Urinary Malondialdehyde (MDA), Uric acid, and Protein as markers of perinatal asphyxia (PubMed)

Serum and Urinary Malondialdehyde (MDA), Uric acid, and Protein as markers of perinatal asphyxia Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is among the leading causes of neonatal morbidity and death in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The aims of this research were to determine the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA), urine MDA, uric acid, and protein in the cord blood of neonates with perinatal asphyxia and to determine their relationship with the severity of perinatal asphyxia.This matched case (...) -control study was conducted from October 2012 to March 2013. All of the cases and controls were selected from the Gynecology & Obstetrics Department and the NICUs, at Qous Central Hospital in Qena, Egypt. We allocated 20 full-term neonates who had perinatal asphyxia to the case group. Also, we selected 20 healthy neonates for the control group. The subjects were matched with respect to age and gender. At birth and 48 hours later, measurements were made of MDA in cord blood and urine, and uric acid

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2016 Electronic physician

17. Uric Acid: A Biomarker to Predict Clinical Progression of Parkinson Disease

Uric Acid: A Biomarker to Predict Clinical Progression of Parkinson Disease "Uric Acid: A Biomarker to Predict Clinical Progression of Parkinson Di" by Whitni Friberg < > > > > > Title Author Date of Graduation Summer 8-8-2015 Degree Type Capstone Project Degree Name Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies First Advisor Annjanette Sommers, PA-C, MS Rights . Abstract Background: Parkinson disease (PD) is a prevalent progressive neurodegenerative disorder, affecting millions. Research (...) continues to evolve and the medical community continues to gain knowledge surrounding the complex mechanism and pathophysiology of depletion of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra. Researchers continue to search for new links and possible disease-modifying therapies, as treatment options for PD are primarily symptomatic. Serum uric acid, a powerful antioxidant, has been associated with a decreased risk of Parkinson disease at elevated levels in several studies, indicating a possible neuroprotective

2015 Pacific University EBM Capstone Project

18. Zurampic (lesinurad) - To treat high blood uric acid levels associated with gout

Zurampic (lesinurad) - To treat high blood uric acid levels associated with gout Zurampic Tablets U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Search FDA Submit search Zurampic Tablets Zurampic Tablets Company: Ardea Biosciences, Inc. Application No.: 207988 Approval Date: 12/22/2015 Persons with disabilities having problems accessing the PDF files below may call (301) 796-3634 for assistance. (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) (PDF) Date created

2015 FDA - Drug Approval Package

19. Rilonacept for Gout Flare Prevention in Patients Receiving Uric Acid-lowering Therapy: Results of RESURGE, a Phase III, International Safety Study (PubMed)

Rilonacept for Gout Flare Prevention in Patients Receiving Uric Acid-lowering Therapy: Results of RESURGE, a Phase III, International Safety Study To evaluate the safety and efficacy of once-weekly subcutaneous rilonacept 160 mg for prevention of gout flares in patients initiating or continuing urate-lowering therapy (ULT).This phase III study was conducted in the United States, South Africa, Europe, and Asia. Adults (n = 1315, 18-80 yrs) with gout, who were initiating or continuing ULT, were

2014 EvidenceUpdates

20. Randomized Controlled Trial of Febuxostat Versus Allopurinol or Placebo in Individuals with Higher Urinary Uric Acid Excretion and Calcium Stones (PubMed)

Randomized Controlled Trial of Febuxostat Versus Allopurinol or Placebo in Individuals with Higher Urinary Uric Acid Excretion and Calcium Stones Higher urinary uric acid excretion is a suspected risk factor for calcium oxalate stone formation. Febuxostat, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, is effective in lowering serum urate concentration and urinary uric acid excretion in healthy volunteers and people with gout. This work studied whether febuxostat, compared with allopurinol and placebo (...) , would reduce 24-hour urinary uric acid excretion and prevent stone growth or new stone formation.In this 6-month, double-blind, multicenter, randomized controlled trial, hyperuricosuric participants with a recent history of calcium stones and one or more radio-opaque calcium stone ≥ 3 mm (as seen by multidetector computed tomography) received daily febuxostat at 80 mg, allopurinol at 300 mg, or placebo. The primary end point was percent change from baseline to month 6 in 24-hour urinary uric acid

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2013 EvidenceUpdates