Latest & greatest articles for Travelers Diarrhea

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Top results for Travelers Diarrhea

1. Rifamycin (Aemcolo) - To treat travelers? diarrhea

Rifamycin (Aemcolo) - To treat travelers? diarrhea Drug Approval Package: AEMCOLO (rifamycin) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Search FDA Submit search Drug Approval Package: AEMCOLO (rifamycin) Company:Cosmo Technologies, Inc. Application Number: 210910Orig 1 Approval Date: 11/16/2018 Persons with disabilities having problems accessing the PDF files below may call (301) 796-3634 for assistance. FDA Approval Letter and Labeling (PDF) (PDF) FDA Application Review Files (PDF) (PDF

2019 FDA - Drug Approval Package

2. Review: chronic and persistent diarrhea with a focus in the returning traveler (PubMed)

Review: chronic and persistent diarrhea with a focus in the returning traveler Travelers' diarrhea is a common malady afflicting up to 50% of travelers after a 2-week travel period. An appreciable percentage of these cases will become persistent or chronic. We summarized the published literature reporting persistent/chronic diarrhea in travelers elucidating current understanding of disease incidence, etiology and regional variability.We searched electronic databases (Medline, Embase (...) heterogeneity statistics, graphically represented with Forest plots.We identified 19 studies meeting the inclusion criteria (all published after 1999). 18 studies reported upon the incidence of persistent/chronic diarrhea as a syndromic diagnosis in returning travelers; one study reported adequate denominator data from which to assess pathogen specific etiology. Giardiasis comprise an appreicaible percentage of infectious mediated persistent/chronic diarrhea in returning travelers. The overall estimate

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Tropical diseases, travel medicine and vaccines

4. Summary of the Committee to Advise on Tropical Medicine and Travel (CATMAT) statement on travellers' diarrhea

Summary of the Committee to Advise on Tropical Medicine and Travel (CATMAT) statement on travellers' diarrhea CATMAT Statement: TravelersDiarrhea - Canada.ca Language selection Search Search Canada.ca Search Menu Main Menu You are here: CATMAT Statement: TravelersDiarrhea Published by: Issue: Date published: November 5, 2015 ISSN: 1481-8531 Submit a manuscript About CCDR Browse Volume 41-11, November 5, 2015: Foodborne Illness Advisory Committee Statement Summary of the Committee to Advise (...) on Tropical Medicine and Travel (CATMAT) Statement on TravelersDiarrhea Libman M 1 , on behalf of CATMAT* Affiliation 1 Division of Infectious Disease, McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, QC Correspondence DOI https://doi.org/10.14745/ccdr.v41i11a03 Abstract Background: Most travellers' diarrhea (TD) infections occur during travel to low- and middle-income countries. Type of travel, duration of stay, age of traveller and presence of certain medical conditions are important factors to consider

2015 CPG Infobase

5. Effectiveness of rifaximin and fluoroquinolones in preventing travelers' diarrhea (TD): a systematic review and meta-analysis

Effectiveness of rifaximin and fluoroquinolones in preventing travelers' diarrhea (TD): a systematic review and meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2012 DARE.

6. Development of a travelers' diarrhea vaccine for the military: how much is an ounce of prevention really worth?

Development of a travelers' diarrhea vaccine for the military: how much is an ounce of prevention really worth? Development of a travelers' diarrhea vaccine for the military: how much is an ounce of prevention really worth? Development of a travelers' diarrhea vaccine for the military: how much is an ounce of prevention really worth? Riddle MS, Tribble DR, Cachafiero SP, Putnam SD, Hooper TI Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria (...) : Although the methodology appears to have been appropriate, the results were not clearly reported and are therefore difficult to understand. As a result, it is not possible to ascertain if the authors' conclusions are valid. Funding No internal nor external funding received. Bibliographic details Riddle MS, Tribble DR, Cachafiero SP, Putnam SD, Hooper TI. Development of a travelers' diarrhea vaccine for the military: how much is an ounce of prevention really worth? Vaccine 2008; 26(20): 2490-2502

2008 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

7. Effect of adjunctive loperamide in combination with antibiotics on treatment outcomes in traveler's diarrhea: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Effect of adjunctive loperamide in combination with antibiotics on treatment outcomes in traveler's diarrhea: a systematic review and meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 DARE.

8. Rifaximin: A useful drug for travelers’ diarrhea

Rifaximin: A useful drug for travelersdiarrhea Rifaximin: A useful drug for travelersdiarrhea – Clinical Correlations Search Rifaximin: A useful drug for travelersdiarrhea September 28, 2007 4 min read | | Sites We Follow: Useful Links: Questions? Comments? Contact us! © New York University. All rights reserved. Electronic ISSN 1944-0030. The content of this site is intended for health care professionals.

2007 Clinical Correlations

9. Statement on persistent diarrhea in the returned traveller

Statement on persistent diarrhea in the returned traveller ARCHIVED - Statement On Persistent Diarrhea In The Returned Traveller - Canada.ca Language selection Search Search Canada.ca Search Menu Main Menu You are here: ARCHIVED - Statement On Persistent Diarrhea In The Returned Traveller We have archived this page and will not be updating it. You can use it for research or reference. We have archived this page and will not be updating it. You can use it for research or reference. Canada (...) differ from that set out in the product monograph(s) or other similarly approved standards or instructions for use by the licensed manufacturer(s). Manufacturers have sought approval and provided evidence as to the safety and efficacy of their products only when used in accordance with the product monographs or other similarly approved standards or instructions for use. Introduction Diarrhea is the most common medical problem among travellers to low-income countries. A large number of enteric

2006 CPG Infobase

10. Statement on new oral cholera and travellers' diarrhea vaccination

Statement on new oral cholera and travellers' diarrhea vaccination ARCHIVED - Statement on New Oral Cholera and Travellers' Diarrhea Vaccination - Canada.ca Language selection Search Search Canada.ca Search Menu Main Menu You are here: ARCHIVED - Statement on New Oral Cholera and Travellers' Diarrhea Vaccination We have archived this page and will not be updating it. You can use it for research or reference. We have archived this page and will not be updating it. You can use it for research (...) , short-term protection against diarrhea caused by ETEC (17,18) . In the Bangladesh oral cholera vaccine field trial, the BS-WC vaccine demonstrated 67% protection against ETEC for 3 months (18) . A prospective double-blind study of U.S. students in Mexico demonstrated a protective efficacy of approximately 50% against ETEC diarrhea (19) . Given the proportion of travellers' diarrhea caused by ETEC, it would be expected that the overall protection against travellers' diarrhea would be about 25

2005 CPG Infobase

11. Oral aztreonam, a poorly absorbed yet effective therapy for bacterial diarrhea in US travelers to Mexico. (PubMed)

Oral aztreonam, a poorly absorbed yet effective therapy for bacterial diarrhea in US travelers to Mexico. To evaluate a poorly absorbed antimicrobial with in vitro activity against all major bacterial enteropathogens in oral therapy for bacterial diarrhea.One hundred ninety-one US students with diarrhea acquired in Mexico received 100 mg of aztreonam or matching placebo three times a day for 5 days. Stools were cultured for bacterial enteropathogens before and after therapy.We studied US (...) students who acquired diarrhea in Mexico (travelers' diarrhea) in view of the high frequency of bacterial agents in this setting.We examined time of clinical recovery, treatment failures, adverse experiences, and microbiologic eradication from stool of the etiologic agent in subjects randomized to receive aztreonam or placebo.Aztreonam reduced the average duration of diarrhea compared with the placebo: for all cases, by 40 hours (P much less than .01); for those with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

1992 JAMA

12. Treatment of traveler's diarrhea with sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim and loperamide. (PubMed)

Treatment of traveler's diarrhea with sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim and loperamide. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 227 US adults with acute diarrhea in Mexico received a single dose of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim (1600/320 mg) or 3 days of therapy with loperamide hydrochloride (4-mg loading dose, then 2 mg orally after each loose stool), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (800/160 mg orally twice daily), or the combination of both. Subjects treated (...) ). The combination of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim plus loperamide can be highly recommended for the treatment of most patients with traveler's diarrhea.

1990 JAMA

13. Prevention of travelers' diarrhea by the tablet formulation of bismuth subsalicylate. (PubMed)

Prevention of travelers' diarrhea by the tablet formulation of bismuth subsalicylate. Within 48 hours of arrival in Mexico, 182 US students participated in a study to compare the efficacy of two dosages of bismuth subsalicylate (262 mg per tablet) as a prophylactic agent against diarrhea. The students were randomly assigned to receive two tablets (high dose) or one tablet (low dose) of bismuth subsalicylate four times daily or a placebo four times daily during a three-week period. Among (...) the low-dose regimen, and in seven placebo-treated subjects. Bismuth subsalicylate was well tolerated; the most common side effects were blackening of tongues and stools. Bismuth subsalicylate use in both dosages was associated with tinnitus at a low, clinically insignificant frequency of 1.2 days per 100 days of treatment. The dosage of two tablets of bismuth subsalicylate four times daily (2.1 g/d) appears to be a safe and effective means of reducing the occurrence of travelers' diarrhea among

1987 JAMA

14. Comparison of loperamide with bismuth subsalicylate for the treatment of acute travelers' diarrhea. (PubMed)

Comparison of loperamide with bismuth subsalicylate for the treatment of acute travelers' diarrhea. Loperamide hydrochloride was compared with bismuth subsalicylate for the treatment of acute nondysenteric travelers' diarrhea in 219 students visiting seven countries in Latin America. Subjects whose condition was not improved with therapy could elect to take trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Persons receiving loperamide passed fewer unformed stools when compared with the bismuth subsalicylate group (...) of the loperamide-treated subjects experienced constipation compared with one in the bismuth subsalicylate-treated group; otherwise, there was no difference in minor side effects experienced between both treatment groups. We conclude that loperamide is a safe and effective alternative to bismuth subsalicylate for the treatment of nondysenteric travelers' diarrhea.

1986 JAMA

15. Treatment of travelers' diarrhea with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and with trimethoprim alone. (PubMed)

Treatment of travelers' diarrhea with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and with trimethoprim alone. We conducted a double-blind treatment study of 110 adults from the United States who were attending summer classes in Guadalajara, Mexico, and had diarrhea (four or more unformed stools in 24 hours, or three or more unformed stools per eight-hour period plus one or more additional clinical indicators of enteric infection). Thirty-seven patients received trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) (160 (...) with an enteropathogen. Five per cent of patients given TMP/SMX, 8 per cent of those given TMP, and 49 per cent of those given placebo were considered treatment failures (P less than 0.001 for both active drugs as compared with placebo). Early treatment with TMP/SMX or TMP is an alternative to prophylactic use of drugs for travelers' diarrhea.

1982 NEJM

16. Prevention of traveler's diarrhea (emporiatric enteritis). Prophylactic administration of subsalicylate bismuth). (PubMed)

Prevention of traveler's diarrhea (emporiatric enteritis). Prophylactic administration of subsalicylate bismuth). The efficacy of a daily dosage regimen of subsalicylate bismuth in preventing or reducing the severity of diarrhea among young healthy adults was evaluated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Diarrhea developed in 14 (23%) of 62 students receiving subsalicylate bismuth compared with 40 (61%) of 66 students taking a placebo. The protective effect of subsalicylate (...) bismuth was apparent within a day or two of the study onset and became more obvious as the number of days at risk increased. The students treated with subsalicylate bismuth experienced fewer intestinal complaints and were less likely to pass soft or watery stools of any number. Once diarrhea occurred, enteropathogens were less commonly identified in stools of students receiving subsalicylate bismuth (33%) compared with placebo (71%). Subsalicylate bismuth was well tolerated by students during the 21

1980 JAMA

17. Prophylactic doxycycline for travelers' diarrhea. Results of a prospective double-blind study of Peace Corps volunteers in Kenya. (PubMed)

Prophylactic doxycycline for travelers' diarrhea. Results of a prospective double-blind study of Peace Corps volunteers in Kenya. We performed a randomized double-blind study to determine the efficacy of doxycycline (100 mg daily) in preventing travelers' diarrhea among 39 Peace Corps volunteers during their first five weeks in Kenya. The volunteers took either doxycycline or placebo for three weeks and were observed for an additional two weeks. Nine of 21 taking placebo and one of 18 taking (...) doxycycline had travelers' diarrhea during the treatment period (P = 0.012). The protection seemed to persist for at least one week after the drug was stopped. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was the only pathogen isolated from the placebo group, but was not detected in persons taking doxycycline. None of these organisms were resistant to doxycycline or tetracycline, whereas resistance to tetracyclines and other antibiotics was common among the nonenterotoxigenic Esch. coli. We conclude that doxycycline

1978 NEJM