Latest & greatest articles for Topical Analgesic

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Top results for Topical Analgesic

1. Are Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Useful for Analgesia in Patients With Traumatic Corneal Abrasions? Full Text available with Trip Pro

, , and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform in March 2017. Study Selection Studies were included if they were randomized controlled trials comparing topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with placebo or any alternative analgesic in adults with corneal abrasions. The primary outcomes were patient-reported pain reduction greater than 30% or more and 50% or more after 24 hours. The secondary outcomes of the review included the use of rescue analgesia after 24 hours (...) | There is no consensus on how analgesia for corneal abrasions should be managed in the ED, and there appears to be no universally accepted approach on the use of topical or oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. x 6 Calder, L., Balasubramanian, S., and Stiell, I. Lack of consensus on corneal abrasion management: results of a national survey. CJEM . 2004 ; 6 : 402–407 | | | This review attempted to study whether there was evidence among the available randomized controlled trials that topical nonsteroidal anti

2019 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

2. Compounded Topical Pain Creams to Treat Localized Chronic Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial. (Abstract)

Compounded Topical Pain Creams to Treat Localized Chronic Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial. The use of compounded topical pain creams has increased dramatically, yet their effectiveness has not been well evaluated.To determine the efficacy of compounded creams for chronic pain.Randomized controlled trials of 3 interventions. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02497066).Military treatment facility.399 patients with localized pain classified by each patient's treating physician as neuropathic (n = 133 (...) , -0.9 to 0.2 points]), or for all patients (-0.3 points [CI, -0.6 to 0.1 points]). At 1 month, 72 participants (36%) in the treatment groups and 54 (28%) in the control group had a positive outcome (risk difference, 8% [CI, -1% to 17%]).Generalizability is limited by heterogeneity among pain conditions and formulations of the study interventions. Randomized follow-up was only 1 month.Compounded pain creams were not better than placebo creams, and their higher costs compared with approved compounds

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine Controlled trial quality: predicted high

3. Effect of topical glyceryl trinitrate cream on pain perception during intrauterine device insertion in multiparous women: A randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled study. (Abstract)

Effect of topical glyceryl trinitrate cream on pain perception during intrauterine device insertion in multiparous women: A randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled study. Intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) insertion-related pain presents a push beyond the decline of women to use IUD for family planning. We aimed to investigate the analgesic effect of glyceryl trinitrate cream (GTN) in reducing pain during IUD insertion.We conducted a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled study (...) the participant's self-rated pain perception utilizing a 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) during cervical tenaculum placement, uterine sound and IUD insertion, then 15 min post-procedure.100 women were enrolled and randomized to GTN arm (n = 50) or placebo (n = 50). Women in the GTN arm reported lower VAS scores during tenaculum placement, sound and IUD insertion (median: 2 vs. 4, p < 0.0001; 2.5 vs. 4.5, p < 0.001;3 vs. 5.5, p < 0.0001, respectively). Higher ease of insertion score was also determined among

2019 Journal of gynecology obstetrics and human reproduction Controlled trial quality: predicted high

4. Topical analgesics for acute and chronic pain in adults - an overview of Cochrane Reviews. Full Text available with Trip Pro

rubefacients, capsaicin, and lidocaine) applied to intact skin for the treatment of acute and chronic pain in adults.We identified systematic reviews in acute and chronic pain published to February 2017 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (the Cochrane Library). The primary outcome was at least 50% pain relief (participant-reported) at an appropriate duration. We extracted the number needed to treat for one additional beneficial outcome (NNT) for efficacy outcomes for each topical analgesic (...) Topical analgesics for acute and chronic pain in adults - an overview of Cochrane Reviews. Topical analgesic drugs are used for a variety of painful conditions. Some are acute, typically strains or sprains, tendinopathy, or muscle aches. Others are chronic, typically osteoarthritis of hand or knee, or neuropathic pain.To provide an overview of the analgesic efficacy and associated adverse events of topical analgesics (primarily nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), salicylate

2017 Cochrane

5. Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain

Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By June 25, 2015 // Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are routinely prescribed for mild to moderate pain and are the most commonly prescribed painkilling drugs worldwide. Taken by mouth or injected into a vein, the high concentrations of the drug throughout the body, necessary in order to work at the site of pain (...) that topical NSAIDs are an effective and safe means of relieving acute musculoskeletal pain in adults. The new evidence also tells us much more than we knew before about which ones work best. The evidence comes from 61 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 8386 people. Several different topical NSAIDs were compared, mostly with placebo in the same carrier – so gel with a drug compared to the gel without a drug, for example. Both would be rubbed into the skin so we know that any effect is not just from

2015 Evidently Cochrane

6. Does Topical Anesthetic Reduce Pain During Intraosseous Pin Removal in Children? A Randomized Controlled Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

of individuals, follow-up telephone calls were made 24 hours postprocedure to inquire about any adverse event from the use of the topical liposomal lidocaine. Data were analyzed using the Student t test.Of a total of 296 recruited subjects, complete data were available on 281 subjects (140 intervention and 141 control). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups with regards to baseline characteristics, including preprocedure pain scores. Although postprocedure pain scores demonstrated (...) Does Topical Anesthetic Reduce Pain During Intraosseous Pin Removal in Children? A Randomized Controlled Trial The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of topical liposomal lidocaine in reducing the pain perceived by children undergoing percutaneous intraosseous pin (PP) removal in the outpatient orthopaedic clinic.A triple-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial comparing topical liposomal lidocaine to a placebo was conducted at the Stollery Children's

2015 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

7. The effects of topical heat therapy on chest pain in patients with acute coronary syndrome: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial (Abstract)

The effects of topical heat therapy on chest pain in patients with acute coronary syndrome: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial To investigate the effects of local heat therapy on chest pain in patients with acute coronary syndrome.Chest pain is a very common complaint in patients with acute coronary syndrome. It is managed both pharmacologically and nonpharmacologically. Pharmacological pain management is associated with different side effects.This was a randomised (...) decreased significantly after the study. Moreover, the groups differed significantly in terms of the need for opioid analgesic therapy neither before nor after the intervention.Local heat therapy is an effective intervention for preventing and relieving chest pain in patients with acute coronary syndrome.Effective pain management using local heat therapy could help nurses play an important role in providing effective care to patients with acute coronary syndrome and in minimising adverse effects

2014 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

8. Randomised, placebo controlled, double blind trial: Topical lidocaine?epinephrine?tetracaine is effective in reducing pain during laceration repair with tissue adhesive in children

Randomised, placebo controlled, double blind trial: Topical lidocaine?epinephrine?tetracaine is effective in reducing pain during laceration repair with tissue adhesive in children Topical lidocaine–epinephrine–tetracaine is effective in reducing pain during laceration repair with tissue adhesive in children | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn (...) more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Topical lidocaine–epinephrine–tetracaine is effective in reducing pain during

2014 Evidence-Based Nursing

9. Efficacy of pain control with topical lidocaine-epinephrine-tetracaine during laceration repair with tissue adhesive in children: a randomized controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Efficacy of pain control with topical lidocaine-epinephrine-tetracaine during laceration repair with tissue adhesive in children: a randomized controlled trial Some children feel pain during wound closures using tissue adhesives. We sought to determine whether a topically applied analgesic solution of lidocaine-epinephrine-tetracaine would decrease pain during tissue adhesive repair.We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded trial involving 221 children between the ages of 3 months (...) of wound closure and wound hemostasis, in addition to their prediction as to which treatment the patient had received.Children who received the analgesic before wound closure reported less pain (median 0.5, interquartile range [IQR] 0.25-1.50) than those who received placebo (median 1.00, IQR 0.38-2.50) as rated using the colour Visual Analogue Scale (p=0.01) and Faces Pain Scale--Revised (median 0.00, IQR 0.00-2.00, for analgesic v. median 2.00, IQR 0.00-4.00, for placebo, p<0.01). Patients who

2013 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

10. Systematic review with meta-analysis: Topical NSAIDS provide effective pain relief for patients with hand or knee osteoarthritis with similar efficacy, and fewer side effects, than oral NSAIDS Full Text available with Trip Pro

Systematic review with meta-analysis: Topical NSAIDS provide effective pain relief for patients with hand or knee osteoarthritis with similar efficacy, and fewer side effects, than oral NSAIDS Topical NSAIDS provide effective pain relief for patients with hand or knee osteoarthritis with similar efficacy, and fewer side effects, than oral NSAIDS | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie (...) settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Topical NSAIDS provide effective pain

2013 Evidence-Based Medicine

11. American College of Chest Physicians Consensus Statement on the Use of Topical Anesthesia, Analgesia, and Sedation During Flexible Bronchoscopy in Adult Patients

was reached by the panel members after a comprehensive review of the data. Randomized controlled trials and prospective studies were given highest priority in building the consensus. Results: In the absence of contraindications, topical anesthesia, analgesia, and sedation are suggested in all patients undergoing bronchoscopy because of enhanced patient tolerance and satisfaction. Robust data suggest that anticholinergic agents, when administered prebronchoscopy, do not produce a clinically meaningful (...) : Propofol is an IV anesthetic that produces sedation, anxiolysis, and amnesia but has no direct analgesic properties. 56 Although used less commonly in clinical practice than other sedatives, a number of studies have evaluated the use of propofol for sedation during bronchoscopic procedures. One small random- ized study evaluated propofol vs topical anesthesia only and found that patients in the propofol group had less pain, sensation of asphyxiation, and cough. 9 A few randomized clinical trials have

2011 American College of Chest Physicians

12. Cochrane systematic review: Topical NSAIDs provide effective relief of acute musculoskeletal pain compared to placebo, with no increase in risk of adverse effects

Cochrane systematic review: Topical NSAIDs provide effective relief of acute musculoskeletal pain compared to placebo, with no increase in risk of adverse effects Topical NSAIDs provide effective relief of acute musculoskeletal pain compared to placebo, with no increase in risk of adverse effects | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about (...) how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Topical NSAIDs provide effective relief of acute musculoskeletal pain compared to placebo

2011 Evidence-Based Nursing

13. Selected topics in stroke management. Shoulder pain assessment and treatment. In: Canadian best practice recommendations for stroke care.

Selected topics in stroke management. Shoulder pain assessment and treatment. In: Canadian best practice recommendations for stroke care. Guidelines and Measures | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality HHS.gov Search ahrq.gov Search ahrq.gov Menu Topics A - Z Healthcare Delivery Latest available findings on quality of and access to health care Searchable database of AHRQ Grants, Working Papers & HHS Recovery Act Projects AHRQ Projects funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust

2010 Canadian Stroke Network

14. Randomised controlled trial: 0.2% topical lidocaine reduces pain during and immediately after vacuum-assisted closure dressing changes, but effects may be short lived

Randomised controlled trial: 0.2% topical lidocaine reduces pain during and immediately after vacuum-assisted closure dressing changes, but effects may be short lived 0.2% topical lidocaine reduces pain during and immediately after vacuum-assisted closure dressing changes, but effects may be short lived | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more (...) about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here 0.2% topical lidocaine reduces pain during and immediately after vacuum-assisted closure

2010 Evidence-Based Nursing

15. Effect of topical alkane vapocoolant spray on pain with intravenous cannulation in patients in emergency departments: randomised double blind placebo controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of topical alkane vapocoolant spray on pain with intravenous cannulation in patients in emergency departments: randomised double blind placebo controlled trial. To assess the efficacy, acceptability, and safety of a topical alkane vapocoolant in reducing pain during intravenous cannulation in adults.Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial.Emergency department of a metropolitan teaching hospital.201 adult patients (54% male), mean (SD) age 58.2 (19.5) years, who required (...) ). Median (interquartile range) pain scores for cannulation in the control and intervention groups were 36 (19-51) and 12 (5-40) mm, respectively (P<0.001), and 59 (60%) and 33 (32%) reported pain scores >or=30 mm (P<0.001). Scores for spray discomfort also differed significantly (P<0.001) because of skewing to the right within the intervention group. The median discomfort scores, however, were 0 mm in both groups. Success rates for first cannulation attempt did not differ between groups (P=0.39

2009 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

16. Role of topical analgesia in acute otitis media.

or saline ear drops Prospective randomised controlled trial Reduction in pain score by 50% Statistically significant reduction in pain score at 10 and 30 min for lignocaine drops vs saline but not at 20 min Not adjusted for administration of oral analgesia Placebo (saline) effective at 30 min for 59% of children Comment(s) Topical analgesics, in the form of eardrops, may have benefit in the treatment of acute otitis media. Their application is for symptomatic relief. There was no evidence in the review (...) media] is [the use of topical analgesia better than placebo] at [reducing pain and discomfort]? Clinical Scenario A 6 year-old boy presents to the emergency department with a two day history of earache and fever. After examination, Acute Otitis Media was diagnosed and a prescription for analgesia and oral antibiotic course were given. You wonder if the administration of topical analgesia (ie eardrops) would be helpful in providing additional and fast relief of this child's pain symptoms. Search

2008 BestBETS

17. Advice to use topical or oral ibuprofen for chronic knee pain in older people: randomised controlled trial and patient preference study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Advice to use topical or oral ibuprofen for chronic knee pain in older people: randomised controlled trial and patient preference study. To determine whether older patients with chronic knee pain should be advised to use topical or oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).Randomised controlled trial and patient preference study.26 general practices.People aged > or =50 with knee pain: 282 in randomised trial and 303 in preference study.Advice to use topical or oral ibuprofen. Primary (...) . The oral group had more respiratory adverse effects (17% v 7%,95% confidence interval for difference -17% to -2%), the change in serum creatinine was 3.7 mmol/l less favourable (0.9 micromol/l to 6.5 micromol/l); and more participants changed treatments because of adverse effects (16% v 1%, -16% to -5%). In the topical group more participants had chronic pain grade III or IV at three months, and more participants changed treatment because of ineffectiveness.Advice to use oral or topical preparations

2008 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

18. Topical analgesia for pain reduction in arterial puncture

Topical analgesia for pain reduction in arterial puncture BestBets: Topical Analgesia for Pain Reduction in Arterial Puncture Topical Analgesia for Pain Reduction in Arterial Puncture Report By: Debbie Dawson - Clinical Research Nurse Search checked by Kerstin Hogg - Clinical Research Fellow Institution: Manchester Royal Infirmary Date Submitted: 2nd December 2002 Date Completed: 12th April 2005 Last Modified: 6th January 2005 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [patients who (...) of 60-90 minutes is necessary for adequate anaesthesia; the manufacturers of tetracaine recommend 45mins application prior to venepuncture. It may be necessary that longer application times are needed for deeper structures. Clinical Bottom Line The papers found in this search provide little evidence for the effectiveness of topical analgesia in reducing the pain and discomfort of arterial puncture. Further studies with longer application times would be useful. References Tran NQ, Pretto JJ, Worsnop

2005 BestBETS