Latest & greatest articles for Thoracolumbar Trauma

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on Thoracolumbar Trauma or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on Thoracolumbar Trauma and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for Thoracolumbar Trauma

1. Thoracolumbar spine trauma

Thoracolumbar spine trauma Thoracolumbar spine trauma - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Thoracolumbar spine trauma Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary Usually occurs as a result of high-energy trauma (e.g., road traffic accidents, falls from heights). May occur spontaneously in patients with osteoporotic, neoplastic, or metabolic disorders of the spine. Initial on-the-scene (...) or compression of neural structures. Thoracolumbar fractures are the usual outcome of thoracolumbar trauma. Other outcomes include traumatic disc prolapse, ligamentous injury, and epidural haematoma causing pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots; these occur very rarely without a fracture. This monograph focuses on thoracolumbar spine fracture. History and exam presence of risk factors back pain bruising acute numbness/paraesthesia weakness muscle spasticity/clonus (hypertonicity) or hypotonia

2018 BMJ Best Practice

2. Thoracolumbar Spinal Injuries in Blunt Trauma, Screening for

Thoracolumbar Spinal Injuries in Blunt Trauma, Screening for Thoracolumbar Spinal Injuries in Blunt Trauma, Screening for - Practice Management Guideline Search » Thoracolumbar Spinal Injuries in Blunt Trauma, Screening for Published 2012 Citation: Authors Sixta, Sherry MD; Moore, Forrest O. MD; Ditillo, Michael F. DO; Fox, Adam D. DO; Garcia, Alejandro J. MD; Holena, Daniel MD; Joseph, Bellal MD; Tyrie, Leslie MD; Cotton, Bryan MD, MPH Author Information From the Division of Acute Care Surgery (...) for reprints: Sherry Sixta, MD, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ; email: Sixta-Sherry@CooperHealth.edu. Statement of the Problem Thoracic and lumbar spinal fractures are commonly encountered in blunt trauma patients. Approximately 50% of all vertebral fractures occur in the thoracolumbar spine (TLS), and the incidence of TLS fractures in trauma patients presenting to Level 1 trauma centers is 4% to 5%. [1] Neurologic injury to the spinal cord occurs in 19% to 50% of these patients, and a delay

2012 Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma

3. The reliability of nonreconstructed computerized tomographic scans of the abdomen and pelvis in detecting thoracolumbar spine injuries in blunt trauma patients with altered mental status (PubMed)

The reliability of nonreconstructed computerized tomographic scans of the abdomen and pelvis in detecting thoracolumbar spine injuries in blunt trauma patients with altered mental status Computerized tomography, traditionally utilized to evaluate and detect visceral abdominal and pelvic injuries in multiply injured patients with altered mental status, also has been useful for detecting thoracolumbar spine fractures and dislocations. The purpose of the present study was to test the reliability (...) of nonreconstructed computerized tomography of the abdomen and pelvis as a screening tool for thoracolumbar spine injuries in blunt trauma patients with altered mental status.The study consisted of fifty-nine consecutive patients with altered mental status who were admitted to a Level-II trauma center. Each patient had a nonreconstructed computerized tomographic scan of the abdomen and pelvis (5-mm slices), and of the chest when indicated, as well as anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of the thoracolumbar

2010 EvidenceUpdates