Latest & greatest articles for Tai Chi

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Top results for Tai Chi

1. Tai Chi for rheumatoid arthritis. (Abstract)

Tai Chi for rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease that results in joint deformity and immobility of the musculoskeletal system. The major goals of treatment are to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, slow down or stop joint damage, prevent disability, and preserve or improve the person's sense of well-being and ability to function. Tai Chi, interchangeably known as Tai Chi Chuan, is an ancient Chinese health-promoting martial art (...) form that has been recognized in China as an effective arthritis therapy for centuries. This is an update of a review published in 2004.To assess the benefits and harms of Tai Chi as a treatment for people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).We updated the search of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and clinical trial registries from 2002 to September 2018.We selected randomized controlled trials and controlled clinical trials examining the benefits (ACR improvement criteria or pain, disease progression

2019 Cochrane

2. Adult nursing: Tai Chi: a promising adjunct nursing intervention to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease and improve psychosocial well-being in adults with hypertension

Adult nursing: Tai Chi: a promising adjunct nursing intervention to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease and improve psychosocial well-being in adults with hypertension Tai Chi: a promising adjunct nursing intervention to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease and improve psychosocial well-being in adults with hypertension | Evidence-Based Nursing Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name (...) or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Tai Chi: a promising adjunct nursing intervention to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease and improve psychosocial well-being in adults with hypertension Article Text Commentary Adult nursing Tai Chi: a promising adjunct nursing intervention to reduce risks

2019 Evidence-Based Nursing

3. Tai Chi exercise is more effective than brisk walking in reducing cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with hypertension: A randomised controlled trial (Abstract)

Tai Chi exercise is more effective than brisk walking in reducing cardiovascular disease risk factors among adults with hypertension: A randomised controlled trial Physical inactivity is a major modifiable lifestyle risk factor associated with cardiovascular disease. Tai Chi is a safe and popular form of physical activity among older adults, yet direct comparisons are lacking between Tai Chi and brisk walking in their ability to reduce cardiovascular disease risk factors and improve (...) psychosocial well-being.246 adults (mean age = 64.4 ± 9.8 years, age range = 30-91 years, 45.5% men) with hypertension and at least two but not more than three modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors (diabetes, dyslipidaemia, overweight, physical inactivity and smoking) were randomly assigned to either Tai Chi (n = 82), brisk walking (n = 82) or control (n = 82) groups. The Tai Chi and brisk walking groups engaged in moderate-intensity physical activity 150 min/week for 3 months; daily home-based

2018 EvidenceUpdates

4. The effect of Tai Chi training on the dual-tasking performance of stroke survivors: a randomized controlled trial (Abstract)

The effect of Tai Chi training on the dual-tasking performance of stroke survivors: a randomized controlled trial To compare the effect of Tai Chi training with conventional exercise on dual-tasking performance among stroke survivors.An assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial.Community-dwelling stroke survivors.Community centers and university.Subjects in the Tai Chi group and the conventional exercise group were trained with the corresponding exercises for 12 weeks (1 hour/session, 2 (...) /week). No training was given to the controls.An auditory Stroop test, a turning-while-walking test, and a dual-tasking condition that combined the two tests were conducted at baseline, after the intervention, and one month later.Forty-seven subjects were randomized into Tai Chi group ( n = 15), conventional exercise group ( n = 17), or control group ( n = 15). There was no significant difference in the outcome measures among the three groups after the intervention and at the one month follow-up

2018 EvidenceUpdates

5. Tai Chi and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Compared for Treatment-Naive Patients With COPD: A Randomized Controlled Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Tai Chi and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Compared for Treatment-Naive Patients With COPD: A Randomized Controlled Trial In COPD, functional status is improved by pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) but requires specific facilities. Tai Chi, which combines psychological treatment and physical exercise and requires no special equipment, is widely practiced in China and is becoming increasingly popular in the rest of the world. We hypothesized that Tai Chi is equivalent (ie, difference less than ±4 St (...) . George's Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ] points) to PR.A total of 120 patients (mean FEV1, 1.11 ± 0.42 L; 43.6% predicted) bronchodilator-naive patients were studied. Two weeks after starting indacaterol 150 μg once daily, they randomly received either standard PR thrice weekly or group Tai Chi five times weekly, for 12 weeks. The primary end point was change in SGRQ prior to and following the exercise intervention; measurements were also made 12 weeks after the end of the intervention.The between

2018 EvidenceUpdates

6. Effect of tai chi versus aerobic exercise for fibromyalgia: comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of tai chi versus aerobic exercise for fibromyalgia: comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial. To determine the effectiveness of tai chi interventions compared with aerobic exercise, a current core standard treatment in patients with fibromyalgia, and to test whether the effectiveness of tai chi depends on its dosage or duration.Prospective, randomized, 52 week, single blind comparative effectiveness trial.Urban tertiary care academic hospital in the United States between (...) March 2012 and September 2016.226 adults with fibromyalgia (as defined by the American College of Rheumatology 1990 and 2010 criteria) were included in the intention to treat analyses: 151 were assigned to one of four tai chi groups and 75 to an aerobic exercise group.Participants were randomly assigned to either supervised aerobic exercise (24 weeks, twice weekly) or one of four classic Yang style supervised tai chi interventions (12 or 24 weeks, once or twice weekly). Participants were followed

2018 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

7. A mixed methods study of Tai Chi exercise for patients with chronic heart failure aged 70 years and older Full Text available with Trip Pro

A mixed methods study of Tai Chi exercise for patients with chronic heart failure aged 70 years and older This study aimed to evaluate Tai Chi group training among patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) aged 70 years and older.Physical activity is recommended for CHF treatment. Tai Chi is found to be beneficial to different patient groups, although few studies focus on older patients with CHF.A mixed methods study. Participants were randomly assigned to Tai Chi training twice a week for 16 (...)  weeks (N = 25) or control (N = 20). Quantitative data were collected at baseline, at the end of the training period and 6 months after training, assessing self-rated fatigue and quality of life, natriuretic peptides and physical performance. Individual qualitative interviews were conducted with participants (N = 10) in the Tai Chi training group.No statistical differences between the Tai Chi training group and the control group in quality of life or natriuretic peptides was found. After 16 weeks

2018 Nursing open Controlled trial quality: uncertain

8. Children and Adults Tai Chi Study (CF-CATS2): a randomised controlled feasibility study comparing internet-delivered with face-to-face Tai Chi lessons in cystic fibrosis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Children and Adults Tai Chi Study (CF-CATS2): a randomised controlled feasibility study comparing internet-delivered with face-to-face Tai Chi lessons in cystic fibrosis. Virtual healthcare is fast entering medical practice. Research into the feasibility of using it to teach treatment regimens such as exercise has not been explored. Maintaining an exercise regime can be difficult in cystic fibrosis: group classes risk potential infection, yet motivation is hard to maintain when alone. Tai Chi (...) is a low-impact exercise and involves gentle, demanding movements. This study aimed to assess the feasibility, safety and acceptability of learning Tai Chi via an internet-based approach and compared patient-reported outcomes. Children and adults with cystic fibrosis were recruited to a randomised, comparative effectiveness trial. Participants learnt eight Tai Chi movements; teaching was delivered in eight lessons over 3 months: delivered either via the internet or face-to-face. Assessments were at 3

2018 ERJ open research Controlled trial quality: uncertain

9. Tai Chi Chih Compared With Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for the Treatment of Insomnia in Survivors of Breast Cancer: A Randomized, Partially Blinded, Noninferiority Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Tai Chi Chih Compared With Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for the Treatment of Insomnia in Survivors of Breast Cancer: A Randomized, Partially Blinded, Noninferiority Trial Purpose Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) and Tai Chi Chih (TCC), a movement meditation, improve insomnia symptoms. Here, we evaluated whether TCC is noninferior to CBT-I for the treatment of insomnia in survivors of breast cancer. Patients and Methods This was a randomized, partially blinded, noninferiority

2017 EvidenceUpdates

10. Comparative Effectiveness of Tai Chi Versus Physical Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comparative Effectiveness of Tai Chi Versus Physical Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Trial. Few remedies effectively treat long-term pain and disability from knee osteoarthritis. Studies suggest that Tai Chi alleviates symptoms, but no trials have directly compared Tai Chi with standard therapies for osteoarthritis.To compare Tai Chi with standard physical therapy for patients with knee osteoarthritis.Randomized, 52-week, single-blind comparative effectiveness trial (...) . (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01258985).An urban tertiary care academic hospital.204 participants with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (mean age, 60 years; 70% women; 53% white).Tai Chi (2 times per week for 12 weeks) or standard physical therapy (2 times per week for 6 weeks, followed by 6 weeks of monitored home exercise).The primary outcome was Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included physical function, depression, medication use

2016 Annals of Internal Medicine Controlled trial quality: predicted high

11. Effects of Tai Chi Chuan on cognition of elderly women with mild cognitive impairment. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effects of Tai Chi Chuan on cognition of elderly women with mild cognitive impairment. To detect the effects of Tai Chi Chuan practice on the cognition of elderly subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment.This is a pilot study with 26 elderly patients (mean age of 74 years) with Mild Cognitive Impairment. The evaluation instruments were Subjective Memory Complaint Scale (SMC), Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test (RBMT) and Digit Span Forward and Backward (DSF and DSB) from the Wechsler Adult (...) Intelligence Scale (WAIS). One group of 13 patients received two weekly 60-minute classes of Tai Chi Chuan (Yang style) for 6 consecutive months, and the rest formed the Control Group. The Tai Chi Chuan Group was also evaluated as to learning of the Tai Chi Chuan practical exercises by means of a Specific Learning Test applied after three months of intervention.After six months of intervention, the TCC Group showed significant improvement on the RBMT and the SMC (p = 0.007 and p = 0.023, respectively

2016 Einstein (Sao Paulo, Brazil) Controlled trial quality: uncertain

12. The effects of Tai-Chi in conjunction with thera-band resistance exercise on functional fitness and muscle strength among community-based older people (Abstract)

The effects of Tai-Chi in conjunction with thera-band resistance exercise on functional fitness and muscle strength among community-based older people The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Tai-Chi in conjunction with thera-band resistance exercise on functional fitness and muscle strength in community-based older people.Tai-Chi is known to improve functional fitness in older people. Tai-Chi is usually performed with free hands without resistance training and usually focuses (...) on training lower limbs. To date, no study has examined the use of Tai-Chi in conjunction with thera-band resistance exercise in this population.Cluster randomised trial design.Older people at six senior day care centres in Taiwan were assigned to thera-band resistance exercise or control group using a cluster randomisation. The thera-band resistance exercise group (n = 48) received sixty minute thera-band resistance exercise twice weekly for a period of 16 weeks. The control group (n = 47) underwent

2015 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

13. Effectiveness of Tai Chi in maintenance of cognitive and functional abilities in mild cognitive impairment: a randomised controlled trial. (Abstract)

Effectiveness of Tai Chi in maintenance of cognitive and functional abilities in mild cognitive impairment: a randomised controlled trial. 25001031 2015 03 06 2016 11 25 1024-2708 20 3 Suppl 3 2014 Jun Hong Kong medical journal = Xianggang yi xue za zhi Hong Kong Med J Effectiveness of Tai Chi in maintenance of cognitive and functional abilities in mild cognitive impairment: a randomised controlled trial. 20-3 Lam L C W LC Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Chan W M (...) WM Elderly Health Services, Department of Health, Hong Kong. Kwok T C Y TC Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Chiu H F K HF Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. eng Comparative Study Journal Article Randomized Controlled Trial China Hong Kong Med J 9512509 1024-2708 IM Aged Aged, 80 and over Cognitive Dysfunction physiopathology therapy Disease Progression Female Hong Kong Humans Male Muscle Stretching Exercises methods Tai Ji

2015 Hong Kong medical journal = Xianggang yi xue za zhi Controlled trial quality: uncertain

14. Evidence Map of Tai Chi

Evidence Map of Tai Chi Management Briefs eBrief-no90 -- Enter search terms Button to search HSRD ® Inside VA Budget and Performance Inside the News Room National Observances Special Events » » » » » Management Briefs eBrief-no90 -- Health Services Research & Development Management eBrief no. 90 » Issue 90 February 2015 Evidence Map of Tai Chi Many Veterans desire complementary and alternative medicine or integrative medicine modalities, both for treatment and for the promotion of wellness. Tai (...) Chi was developed as an ancient Chinese martial art and, today, is widely practiced for its health benefits. Results from a national survey conducted on a representative sample of adults in the U.S. estimate that approximately 2.3 million adults had practiced Tai Chi in the past 12 months. Many forms of Tai Chi exist, but in Western culture, it is most commonly taught as a series of slow, gentle, low-impact movements that integrate the breath, mind, and physical activity to achieve greater

2015 Veterans Affairs - R&D

15. Evidence Map of Tai Chi

Evidence Map of Tai Chi Evidence-based Synthesis Program Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research & Development Service September 2014 4 Prepared for: Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Health Administration Quality Enhancement Research Initiative Health Services Research & Development Service Washington, DC 20420 Prepared by: Evidence-based Synthesis Program (ESP) Center West Los Angeles VA Medical Center Los Angeles, CA Paul G. Shekelle, MD, PhD, Director Principal (...) Investigators: Susanne Hempel, PhD Paul G. Shekelle, MD, PhD Co-Investigator: Stephanie L. Taylor, PhD Michele R. Solloway, PhD Research Associates: Isomi M. Miake-Lye, BA Jessica M. Beroes, BS Roberta Shanman, MS Evidence Map of Tai Chii Evidence Map of Tai Chi Evidence-based Synthesis Program PREFACE Quality Enhancement Research Initiative’s (QUERI) Evidence-based Synthesis Program (ESP) was established to provide timely and accurate syntheses of targeted healthcare topics of particular importance

2014 Veterans Affairs Evidence-based Synthesis Program Reports

16. Tai chi for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. (Abstract)

Tai chi for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Stress and a sedentary lifestyle are major determinants of cardiovascular disease (CVD). As tai chi involves exercise and can help in stress reduction, it may be effective in the primary prevention of CVD.To determine the effectiveness of tai chi for the primary prevention of CVD.We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 11, 2013); MEDLINE (Ovid) (1946 to November (...) and reference lists of reviews for further studies. We applied no language restrictions.Randomised controlled trials of tai chi lasting at least three months involving healthy adults or adults at high risk of CVD. The comparison group was no intervention or minimal intervention. The outcomes of interest were CVD clinical events and CVD risk factors. We excluded trials involving multifactorial lifestyle interventions or focusing on weight loss to avoid confounding.Two review authors independently selected

2014 Cochrane

17. Tai chi for improving balance and function in patients with parkinson's disease

Tai chi for improving balance and function in patients with parkinson's disease Tai chi for improving balance and function in patients with parkinson's disease Tai chi for improving balance and function in patients with parkinson's disease Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Tai chi for improving balance and function in patients with parkinson's (...) Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Humans; Muscle Stretching Exercises; Parkinson Disease; Postural Balance; Resistance Training; Tai Ji Language Published English Country of organisation United States English summary An English language summary is available. Address for correspondence HAYES, Inc., 157 S. Broad Street, Suite 200, Lansdale, PA 19446, USA. Tel: 215 855 0615; Fax: 215 855 5218 Email: hayesinfo@hayesinc.com AccessionNumber 32013000586 Date abstract record published 29/07/2013 Health

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

18. Tai chi improves balance in people with Parkinson's disease

Tai chi improves balance in people with Parkinson's disease Tai chi improves balance in people with Parkinson's disease | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name (...) or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Tai chi improves balance in people with Parkinson's disease Article Text Electronic pages Tai chi improves balance in people with Parkinson's disease Mollie Venglar Correspondence to : Mollie Venglar Department of Physical Therapy and Human Performance, Florida Gulf Coast

2013 Evidence-Based Medicine

19. Tai chi and postural stability in patients with Parkinson's disease. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Tai chi and postural stability in patients with Parkinson's disease. Patients with Parkinson's disease have substantially impaired balance, leading to diminished functional ability and an increased risk of falling. Although exercise is routinely encouraged by health care providers, few programs have been proven effective.We conducted a randomized, controlled trial to determine whether a tailored tai chi program could improve postural control in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. We (...) randomly assigned 195 patients with stage 1 to 4 disease on the Hoehn and Yahr staging scale (which ranges from 1 to 5, with higher stages indicating more severe disease) to one of three groups: tai chi, resistance training, or stretching. The patients participated in 60-minute exercise sessions twice weekly for 24 weeks. The primary outcomes were changes from baseline in the limits-of-stability test (maximum excursion and directional control; range, 0 to 100%). Secondary outcomes included measures

2012 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

20. Tai chi exercise in patients with chronic heart failure: a randomized clinical trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Tai chi exercise in patients with chronic heart failure: a randomized clinical trial Preliminary evidence suggests that meditative exercise may have benefits for patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HF); this has not been rigorously tested in a large clinical sample. We sought to investigate whether tai chi, as an adjunct to standard care, improves functional capacity and quality of life in patients with HF.A single-blind, multisite, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial (...) evaluated 100 outpatients with systolic HF (New York Heart Association class I-III, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤40%) who were recruited between May 1, 2005, and September 30, 2008. A group-based 12-week tai chi exercise program (n = 50) or time-matched education (n = 50, control group) was conducted. Outcome measures included exercise capacity (6- minute walk test and peak oxygen uptake) and disease-specific quality of life (Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire).Mean (SD) age

2011 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain