Latest & greatest articles for Stimulant Use Disorder

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Top results for Stimulant Use Disorder

1. Cognitive-behavioural treatment for amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS)-use disorders

Cognitive-behavioural treatment for amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS)-use disorders Cognitive‐behavioural treatment for amphetamine‐type stimulants (ATS)‐use disorders - Harada - 2019 - Campbell Systematic Reviews - Wiley Online Library By continuing to browse this site, you agree to its use of cookies as described in our . Search within Search term Search term SYSTEMATIC REVIEW Open Access Cognitive‐behavioural treatment for amphetamine‐type stimulants (ATS)‐use disorders Department (...) to be effective. However, evidence was weak because existing RCTs were limited and the research quality was relatively low. 7 Authors' conclusions 7.1 Implications for practice Currently, there is insufficient evidence to support the efficacy of cognitive‐behavioural treatment (CBT) for amphetamine‐type stimulant (ATS)‐use disorders. 7.2 Implications for research More randomised trials are required to establish evidence for CBT for ATS‐use disorders, especially CBT should be compared to other types

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2019 Campbell Collaboration

2. Prescription psychostimulants for the treatment of stimulant use disorders in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Prescription psychostimulants for the treatment of stimulant use disorders in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any (...) . No metastases/ only primary tumor 4. No control group 5. Combination therapy or contamination 6. Not about analgesics used in the clinic Full text-screening: As above, with the addition of: 7. No relevant outcome measure reported ">Prioritise the exclusion criteria Example: Two reviewers will independently extract data from each article. We first try to extract numerical data from tables, text or figures. If these are not reported, we will extract data from graphs using digital ruler software. In case data

2019 PROSPERO

3. Cognitive-behavioural treatment for amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS)-use disorders. (PubMed)

Cognitive-behavioural treatment for amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS)-use disorders. Amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) refer to a group of synthetic stimulants including amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) and related substances. ATS are highly addictive and prolonged use may result in a series of mental and physical symptoms including anxiety, confusion, insomnia, mood disturbances, cognitive impairments, paranoia, hallucinations and delusion.Currently (...) there is no widely accepted treatment for ATS-use disorder. However, cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) is the first-choice treatment. The effectiveness of CBT for other substance-use disorders (e.g. alcohol-, opioid- and cocaine-use disorders) has been well documented and as such this basic treatment approach has been applied to the ATS-use disorder.To investigate the efficacy of cognitive-behavioural treatment for people with ATS-use disorder for reducing ATS use compared to other types of psychotherapy

2018 Cochrane

4. Pharmacotherapy for Stimulant Use Disorders

Pharmacotherapy for Stimulant Use Disorders Management Briefs eBrief-no147 -- Pharmacotherapy for Stimulant Use Disorders Enter search terms Button to search HSRD ® Inside VA Budget and Performance Inside the News Room National Observances Special Events » » » » » Management Briefs eBrief-no147 -- Pharmacotherapy for Stimulant Use Disorders Health Services Research & Development Management eBrief no. 147 » Issue 147 October 2018 The report is a product of the VA/HSR&D Evidence Synthesis Program (...) . Pharmacotherapy for Stimulant Use Disorders: A Systematic Review Stimulant use disorders, specifically cocaine and methamphetamine use disorders, present ongoing public health problems in the United States, with major medical, psychiatric, cognitive, socioeconomic, and legal consequences. There are more emergency department visits associated with cocaine compared with other illicit substances, and several US cities consider methamphetamine as the drug of abuse associated with the "most serious consequences

2018 Veterans Affairs - R&D

5. Systematic review with meta-analysis: Stimulant medication for ADHD not associated with subsequent substance use disorders

Systematic review with meta-analysis: Stimulant medication for ADHD not associated with subsequent substance use disorders Stimulant medication for ADHD not associated with subsequent substance use disorders | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Stimulant medication for ADHD not associated with subsequent substance use disorders Article Text Aetiology Systematic review with meta-analysis Stimulant medication for ADHD

2014 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

6. Therapeutic use of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulators for Temporomandibular Joint Disorder pain relief

Therapeutic use of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulators for Temporomandibular Joint Disorder pain relief UTCAT809, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Therapeutic Use Of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulators For Temporomandibular Joint Disorder Pain Relief Clinical Question In a 40 year old female with chronic TMD, does TENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulators) provide better symptom (...) (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation) studies, and 6 PENS (Percutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation) studies. Total participants in the study were 1227, of which 892 were ENS (combined TENS and PENS studies) Meta Analysis Key results For all studies combined, “ENS reduced pain significantly more than placebo using a random effects model (p #2) Alvarez-Arenal/2002 “24 individuals with an average age of 36•5 years (15 males and nine females). 13 were clenchers and 11 grinders. 19 patients presented

2011 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library