Latest & greatest articles for Speech Delay

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Top results for Speech Delay

1. One-Year Language Outcomes in Toddlers With Language Delays: An RCT Follow-up Full Text available with Trip Pro

One-Year Language Outcomes in Toddlers With Language Delays: An RCT Follow-up The current study is a 1-year follow-up analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial of Enhanced Milieu Teaching (EMT) for toddlers with language delays. Outcomes and predictors of child language and parent intervention implementation were examined 6 and 12 months after the end of the intervention.Toddlers with language delays were recruited from the community, and 97 toddlers and parents were randomly assigned (...) to receive usual community treatments or a 3-month EMT intervention with parent training. Multiple regression analyses were used to estimate the differences between groups at the 6- and 12-month follow-up periods. A subgroup of participants with receptive and expressive language delays was used in a post hoc moderator analysis of treatment outcomes.Children in the treatment arm did not differ from children in the control arm at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. However, post hoc analyses revealed that children

2018 EvidenceUpdates

2. Subcortical Brain and Behavior Phenotypes Differentiate Infants with Autism versus Language Delay Full Text available with Trip Pro

Subcortical Brain and Behavior Phenotypes Differentiate Infants with Autism versus Language Delay Younger siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are themselves at increased risk for ASD and other developmental concerns. It is unclear if infants who display developmental concerns, but are unaffected by ASD, share similar or dissimilar behavioral and brain phenotypes to infants with ASD. Most individuals with ASD exhibit heterogeneous difficulties with language (...) , and their receptive-expressive language profiles are often atypical. Yet, little is known about the neurobiology that contributes to these language difficulties.In this study, we used behavioral assessments and structural magnetic resonance imaging to investigate early brain structures and associations with later language skills. High-risk infants who were later diagnosed with ASD (n = 86) were compared with high-risk infants who showed signs of early language delay (n = 41) as well as with high- and low-risk

2017 Biological psychiatry. Cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging

3. Two-Year Outcomes of a Population-Based Intervention for Preschool Language Delay: An RCT Full Text available with Trip Pro

Two-Year Outcomes of a Population-Based Intervention for Preschool Language Delay: An RCT We have previously shown short-term benefits to phonology, letter knowledge, and possibly expressive language from systematically ascertaining language delay at age 4 years followed by the Language for Learning intervention. Here, we report the trial's definitive 6-year outcomes.Randomized trial nested in a population-based ascertainment. Children with language scores >1.25 SD below the mean at age 4 were (...) for intervention families (mean difference AU$4276; 95% CI: $3424 to $5128).Population-based intervention targeting 4-year-old language delay was feasible but did not have lasting impacts on language, possibly reflecting resolution in both groups. Long-term literacy benefits remain possible but must be weighed against its cost.Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

2015 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

4. Screening for speech and language delays and disorders in children age 5 years or younger: a systematic review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

Screening for speech and language delays and disorders in children age 5 years or younger: a systematic review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Screening for speech and language delays and disorders in children age 5 years or younger: a systematic review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Screening for speech and language delays and disorders in children age 5 years or younger: a systematic review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force To evaluate the evidence (...) on screening and treating children for speech and language delays or disorders for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation To evaluate the evidence on screening and treating children for speech and language delays or disorders for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). Screening

2015 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

5. Early intervention for toddlers with language delays: a randomized controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Early intervention for toddlers with language delays: a randomized controlled trial Early interventions for toddlers with expressive and receptive language delays have not resulted in positive expressive language outcomes. This randomized controlled trial tested the effects on language outcomes of a caregiver-implemented communication intervention targeting toddlers at risk for persistent language delays.Participants included 97 toddlers, who were between 24 and 42 months with language scores (...) at least 1.33 SDs below the normative mean and no other developmental delays, and their caregivers. Toddlers were randomly assigned to the caregiver-implemented intervention or a usual-care control group. Caregivers and children participated in 28 sessions in which caregivers were taught to implement the intervention. The primary outcome was the Preschool Language Scale, Fourth Edition, a broad-based measure of language. Outcome measurement was not blinded.Caregivers in the intervention improved

2015 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

6. Speech and Language Delay and Disorders in Children Age 5 and Younger: Screening

Speech and Language Delay and Disorders in Children Age 5 and Younger: Screening Recommendation | United States Preventive Services Taskforce Toggle navigation Main navigation Main navigation Recommendation Children aged 5 years or younger The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for speech and language delay and disorders in children aged 5 years or younger. I View the Clinical Summary in Population Asymptomatic (...) children aged ≤5 years whose parents or clinicians do not have specific concerns about their speech, language, hearing, or development Recommendation No recommendation. Grade: I statement (insufficient evidence) Risk Assessment Risk factors that have been reported to be associated with speech and language delay and disorders include male sex, family history of speech and language impairment, low parental education level, and perinatal risk factors (e.g., prematurity, low birth weight, and birth

2015 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

7. Screening tools compared to parental concern for identifying speech and language delays in preschool children: a review of the diagnostic accuracy

Screening tools compared to parental concern for identifying speech and language delays in preschool children: a review of the diagnostic accuracy Screening tools compared to parental concern for identifying speech and language delays in preschool children: a review of the diagnostic accuracy Screening tools compared to parental concern for identifying speech and language delays in preschool children: a review of the diagnostic accuracy CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record (...) of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation CADTH. Screening tools compared to parental concern for identifying speech and language delays in preschool children: a review of the diagnostic accuracy. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response - Summary with Critical Appraisal. 2013 Authors' conclusions No health technology assessments, systematic

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

8. Screening Tools Compared to Parental Concern for Identifying Speech and Language Delays in Preschool Children: A Review of the Diagnostic Accuracy

Screening Tools Compared to Parental Concern for Identifying Speech and Language Delays in Preschool Children: A Review of the Diagnostic Accuracy Screening Tools Compared With Parental Concern for Identifying Speech and Language Delays in Preschool Children: A Review Context Because the acquisition of speech and language skills is fundamental to a child’s development, early identification of delays in this area is important. Screening for speech and language delays may allow more children (...) to have access to intervention services or assistance at an age when they are likely to derive the greatest benefit. Technology Screening methods used to identify young children at risk of speech and language delays include direct interaction with the child, parent-completed screening instruments such as standardized tests and questionnaires, and expressions of concern from parents regarding their children’s communication skills. Children who have been identified as being at risk can then undergo more

2013 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

9. Folic acid supplements in pregnancy and severe language delay in children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Folic acid supplements in pregnancy and severe language delay in children. Prenatal folic acid supplements reduce the risk of neural tube defects and may have beneficial effects on other aspects of neurodevelopment.To examine associations between mothers' use of prenatal folic acid supplements and risk of severe language delay in their children at age 3 years.The prospective observational Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study recruited pregnant women between 1999 and December 2008. Data (...) language (only 1-word or unintelligible utterances) were rated as having severe language delay.Among 38,954 children, 204 (0.5%) had severe language delay. Children whose mothers took no dietary supplements in the specified exposure interval were the reference group (n = 9052 [24.0%], with severe language delay in 81 children [0.9%]). Adjusted ORs for 3 patterns of exposure to maternal dietary supplements were (1) other supplements, but no folic acid (n = 2480 [6.6%], with severe language delay in 22

2011 JAMA

10. Should creatine kinase be checked in all boys presenting with speech delay?

and language delay. His mother reports he first sat independently at 9 months and walked at 17 months. Search Strategy PubMed August 2006 "Duchenne muscular dystrophy," "speech delay", combined with "screening" and "language". Sixteen references were found in total. Search Outcome OMIM database and specific journals: The titles and the abstracts were reviewed. Eleven studies were relevant; seven articles were selected as directly related to the question. Relevant Paper(s) Author, date and country Patient (...) milestones as this has been clearly shown to be symptomatic of DMD. Other criteria have included speech delay. These parameters appear to be robust when followed prospectively in a cohort of affected boys in the Newborn Screening Study in Wales. Speech problems in boys with DMD have been extensively researched as the mechanism remains unclear. The Welsh cohort demonstrated that 71% of affected boys failed one or both of the speech and language developmental milestones studied (single words at >13.7

2007 BestBETS

11. Screening for speech and language delay in preschool children: systematic evidence review for the US Preventive Services Task Force - Screening

Screening for speech and language delay in preschool children: systematic evidence review for the US Preventive Services Task Force - Screening Screening for speech and language delay in preschool children: systematic evidence review for the US Preventive Services Task Force - Screening Screening for speech and language delay in preschool children: systematic evidence review for the US Preventive Services Task Force - Screening Nelson H D, Nygren P, Walker M, Panoscha R CRD summary This review (...) evaluated the effectiveness of screening for speech and language delay in pre-school children. The authors concluded that there is insufficient evidence on the optimal methods of screening and which instruments to use. Although these conclusions are likely to be reliable, they should be interpreted with some degree of caution given the possibility of language and publication bias. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of screening and interventions for speech and language delay in pre-school

2006 DARE.

12. Screening for speech and language delay in preschool children

Screening for speech and language delay in preschool children Screening for speech and language delay in preschool children Screening for speech and language delay in preschool children Nelson H D, Nygren P, Walker M, Panoscha R Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Nelson H D, Nygren P, Walker M, Panoscha R. Screening (...) for speech and language delay in preschool children. Rockville: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Evidence Synthesis Number 41. 2006 Authors' objectives The aim of this review was to determine the strengths and limits of evidence about the effectiveness of selecting, testing, and managing children with potential speech and language delay in the course of routine primary care. Key questions examined a chain of evidence about the accuracy and feasibility of screening children age 5 years

2006 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

13. Screening for speech and language delay in preschool children: systematic evidence review for the US Preventive Services Task Force - Interventions Full Text available with Trip Pro

Screening for speech and language delay in preschool children: systematic evidence review for the US Preventive Services Task Force - Interventions Screening for speech and language delay in preschool children: systematic evidence review for the US Preventive Services Task Force - Interventions Screening for speech and language delay in preschool children: systematic evidence review for the US Preventive Services Task Force - Interventions Nelson H D, Nygren P, Walker M, Panoscha R CRD summary (...) This review evaluated interventions for speech and language delay in pre-school children. The authors found that there were improvements in some outcomes, but conclusions and generalisability were limited. Although these conclusions are likely to be reliable, they should be interpreted with some degree of caution given the possibility of language and publication bias. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of screening and interventions for speech and language delay in pre-school aged children

2006 DARE.

14. Severe expressive-language delay related to duplication of the Williams-Beuren locus. Full Text available with Trip Pro

was a severe delay in expressive speech, in contrast to the normal articulation and fluent expressive language observed in persons with WBS. Our results suggest that specific genes at 7q11.23 are exquisitely sensitive to dosage alterations that can influence human language and visuospatial capabilities.Copyright 2005 Massachusetts Medical Society. (...) Severe expressive-language delay related to duplication of the Williams-Beuren locus. The Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) locus, at 7q11.23, is prone to recurrent chromosomal rearrangements, including the microdeletion that causes WBS, a multisystem condition with characteristic cardiovascular, cognitive, and behavioral features. It is hypothesized that reciprocal duplications of the WBS interval should also occur, and here we present such a case description. The most striking phenotype

2005 NEJM

15. Speech and Language Therapy Interventions for Children with Primary Speech and Language Delay or Disorder Full Text available with Trip Pro

speech near disorder∗ speech near delaylanguage near disorder∗ language near delayverbal near disorder∗ aprosodi∗ cluttering dysglossia rhinolalia central and auditory and processing and disorder semantic‐pragmatic and disorder 25 or 26 or 27 or 28 or 29 or 30 or 31 or 32 or 33 or 34 or 35 speech near screen∗ language near screen∗ speech near patholog∗ language near patholog∗ speech near therap∗ language near therap∗ Further studies were identified through reference lists from articles (...) Speech and Language Therapy Interventions for Children with Primary Speech and Language Delay or Disorder Speech and Language Therapy Interventions for Children with Primary Speech and Language Delay or Disorder - Law - 2005 - Campbell Systematic Reviews - Wiley Online Library By continuing to browse this site, you agree to its use of cookies as described in our . Search within Search term Search term SYSTEMATIC REVIEW Open Access Speech and Language Therapy Interventions for Children

2005 Campbell Collaboration

16. Cost-effectiveness analysis of current practice and parent intervention for children under 3 years presenting with expressive language delay Full Text available with Trip Pro

or no expressive language (defined as a vocabulary of 30 or less single words); there was no formal evidence of verbal comprehension difficulties (more than 2 standard deviations from the norm), or no informal evidence of more than moderate verbal comprehension delay; the child had not already received speech and language therapy; the child had been given a diagnosis of either language delay, or speech and language delay; and the child had no known aetiological factors. Setting The setting was a mixture (...) approach. The emphasis of the PBI was the development of the child(s expressive language using daily routines and naturally occurring situations. Type of intervention Other: Integrated care. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population The study population comprised children with expressive language delay who had been referred to the speech and language department of Portsmouth PCT. The inclusion criteria were: the child was aged between 22 and 36 months; the child had little

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

17. The feasibility of universal screening for primary speech and language delay: findings from a systematic review of the literature

The feasibility of universal screening for primary speech and language delay: findings from a systematic review of the literature The feasibility of universal screening for primary speech and language delay: findings from a systematic review of the literature The feasibility of universal screening for primary speech and language delay: findings from a systematic review of the literature Law J, Boyle J, Harris F, Harkness A, Nye C Authors' objectives To examine the feasibility of universal (...) screening for speech and language delay. Searching EMBASE, MEDLINE, ERIC, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Linguistics Language Behavior Abstracts were searched for literature published between 1967 and May 1997. SIGLE and the British Library's Index of Conference Proceedings were searched for unpublished literature. No search terms were reported. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review No inclusion criteria were specified. The review included diagnostic accuracy studies. Specific

2000 DARE.

18. Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature

Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Law J, Boyle J, Harris F, Harkness A, Nye C Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Law J (...) , Boyle J, Harris F, Harkness A, Nye C. Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature. Health Technology Assessment 1998; 2(9): 1-184 Authors' objectives Four domains (prevalence, natural history, intervention and screening) were identified as being key to a review of screening issues, with the following objectives being stated: to undertake a systematic review of research into the value of screening and intervention for speech and language delays in children up

1998 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

19. Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature

Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Law J, Boyle J, Harris F, Harkness A, Nye C Authors' objectives To assess the value of screening and intervention for speech and language delays in children up to the age of 7 years. Two additional objectives were to identify priority areas for further (...) not include any diagnostic accuracy studies that compared the performance of the index test with a reference standard of diagnosis. Participants included in the review For effectiveness of intervention: children up to 7 years of age. For accuracy of screening: normal and clinical populations within the 0-7 year age range. Studies had to be of primary speech and language delay. Studies focusing on ADD/ADHD; deafness/sensorineural loss; autism; psychiatric or EBD; Down's Syndrome; cerebral palsy; dyslexia

1998 DARE.

20. Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Full Text available with Trip Pro

Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Screening for speech and language delay: a systematic review of the literature Journals Library An error has occurred in processing the XML document An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need

1998 NIHR HTA programme