Latest & greatest articles for Skin Ulcer

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Top results for Skin Ulcer

1. Interventions for ulceration and other skin changes caused by nerve damage in leprosy. (PubMed)

Interventions for ulceration and other skin changes caused by nerve damage in leprosy. At the end of 2016, 145 countries reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) over 173,000 new cases of leprosy worldwide. In the past 20 years, over 16 million people have been treated for leprosy globally. The condition's main complications are injuries and ulceration caused by sensory loss from nerve damage. In this review we explored interventions to prevent or treat secondary damage to the skin (...) existing ulcers, one of them also evaluated prevention of new ulcers. One study aimed to prevent skin changes, such as cracking and fissures. Investigated interventions included: laser therapy, light-emitting diode (LED), zinc tape, intralesional pentoxifylline, pulsed magnetic fields, wax therapy, ketanserin, human amniotic membrane gel, phenytoin, plaster shoes, and footwear.We are uncertain about the following key results, as the certainty of evidence is very low. All time points were measured from

2019 Cochrane

2. Skin grafts may help heal diabetic foot ulcers and reduce amputations

Skin grafts may help heal diabetic foot ulcers and reduce amputations Skin grafts may help heal diabetic foot ulcers and reduce amputations Discover Portal Discover Portal Skin grafts may help heal diabetic foot ulcers and reduce amputations Published on 19 April 2016 doi: Skin grafts and tissue replacement products can help heal diabetic foot ulcers in some cases, and may also slightly reduce the numbers of future amputations. Foot ulcers are common and can be hard to treat, but failure (...) to heal them carries high risk for amputation and mortality. This review showed skin grafts or tissue replacement moderately increased the healing rate of the most amenable diabetic foot ulcers in people with diabetes – that is, in those who had sufficient blood flow in their feet. Two trials reported slightly fewer amputations in people with diabetes compared to usual care at 12 weeks. The review identified the most relevant trial evidence available. These trials showed some limitations. For example

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

3. Adalimumab (Hyrimoz) - Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn Disease, Papulosquamous Skin Diseases, Hidradenitis Suppurativa, Ankylosing Spondylitis, Uveitis

Adalimumab (Hyrimoz) - Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn Disease, Papulosquamous Skin Diseases, Hidradenitis Suppurativa, Ankylosing Spondylitis, Uveitis 1 ANNEX I SUMMARY OF PRODUCT CHARACTERISTICS 2 This medicinal product is subject to additional monitoring. This will allow quick identification of new safety information. Healthcare professionals are asked to report any suspected adverse reactions. See section 4.8 for how (...) have had an inadequate response to conventional therapy including primary nutrition therapy and a corticosteroid and / or an immunomodulator, or who are intolerant to or have contraindications for such therapies. Ulcerative colitis Hyrimoz is indicated for treatment of moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis in adult patients who have had an inadequate response to conventional therapy including corticosteroids and 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) or azathioprine (AZA), or who are intolerant

2018 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

4. Skin grafts may help heal diabetic foot ulcers and reduce amputations

Skin grafts may help heal diabetic foot ulcers and reduce amputations Skin grafts may help heal diabetic foot ulcers and reduce amputations Discover Portal Discover Portal Skin grafts may help heal diabetic foot ulcers and reduce amputations Published on 19 April 2016 doi: Skin grafts and tissue replacement products can help heal diabetic foot ulcers in some cases, and may also slightly reduce the numbers of future amputations. Foot ulcers are common and can be hard to treat, but failure (...) to heal them carries high risk for amputation and mortality. This review showed skin grafts or tissue replacement moderately increased the healing rate of the most amenable diabetic foot ulcers in people with diabetes – that is, in those who had sufficient blood flow in their feet. Two trials reported slightly fewer amputations in people with diabetes compared to usual care at 12 weeks. The review identified the most relevant trial evidence available. These trials showed some limitations. For example

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

5. Comparative effectiveness of skin substitutes for chronic venous leg ulcers in adults: a review of reviews

Comparative effectiveness of skin substitutes for chronic venous leg ulcers in adults: a review of reviews Comparative effectiveness of skin substitutes for chronic venous leg ulcers in adults: a review of reviews Comparative effectiveness of skin substitutes for chronic venous leg ulcers in adults: a review of reviews HAYES, Inc Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA (...) database. Citation HAYES, Inc. Comparative effectiveness of skin substitutes for chronic venous leg ulcers in adults: a review of reviews. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc. Directory Publication. 2017 Authors' conclusions Health Problem: Venous leg ulcers, also known as venous stasis ulcers or varicose ulcers, are partial or full-thickness defects in the skin of the lower leg, typically between the knee and the ankle, caused by venous hypertension as a result of valvular incompetence and venous reflux

2017 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

6. Comparative effectiveness of skin substitutes for chronic foot ulcers in adults with diabetes mellitus: a review of reviews

Comparative effectiveness of skin substitutes for chronic foot ulcers in adults with diabetes mellitus: a review of reviews Comparative effectiveness of skin substitutes for chronic foot ulcers in adults with diabetes mellitus: a review of reviews Comparative effectiveness of skin substitutes for chronic foot ulcers in adults with diabetes mellitus: a review of reviews HAYES, Inc Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation (...) of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation HAYES, Inc. Comparative effectiveness of skin substitutes for chronic foot ulcers in adults with diabetes mellitus: a review of reviews. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc. Directory Publication. 2017 Authors' conclusions Health Problem: Diabetes can damage blood vessels, compromising blood flow and oxygen circulation. Resulting tissue hypoxia may contribute to failure of even minor wounds to heal. Reasons are multifactorial and may include

2017 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

7. Palliative care - malignant skin ulcer

Palliative care - malignant skin ulcer Palliative care - malignant skin ulcer - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Palliative care - malignant skin ulcer: Summary A malignant ulcer is a proliferative or cavitating primary or secondary cancer in the skin. It may appear as a crater-like wound, a nodular 'fungus', or a 'cauliflower' lesion. Most malignant ulcers develop from a breast, head and neck, or skin cancer. Malignant ulcers are most likely to develop in people older than 70 years (...) of age with metastatic cancer and a life expectancy of 6 months or less. Primary care management of a malignant skin ulcer includes: Assessment of the malignant skin ulcer including the type, site and size of the ulcer, the presence of necrotic tissue, condition of the surrounding skin, and the presence of complications. Discussing with the person their concerns, treatment priorities, and advising that healing is unlikely to be a realistic goal, but that the aim is to maintain the person’s quality

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

8. Genital Skin Lesions (Non-Ulcerative)

Genital Skin Lesions (Non-Ulcerative) MANAGEMENT SUMMARY Genital Skin Lesions (Non-Ulcerative) Patient complains of genital skin lump(s) / bump(s) Examination Note the appearance and location of lesions – together with the history, this is usually sufficient to make a diagnosis. Discrete lumps or bumps in the genital region may be due to normal anatomical findings, or may be due to a small number of sexually transmissible infections. Unusual lesions, including pigmented lesions, should (...) be referred for a specialist opinion before any treatment occurs. Normal anatomical variants Males • Pearly penile papules (coronal papillae), Fordyce glands. Females • Vestibular papillomatosis, Fordyce glands Genital warts Exophytic skin lesions that vary in size/shape and number. Males • Typically at leading edge of prepuce, on frenulum, or more sporadically in coronal sulcus, on penile shaft. Less frequently on scrotum or in pubic area or perianal. Females • Usually vulval (often posteriorly

2017 New Zealand Sexual Health Society

9. Skin grafting and tissue replacement for treating foot ulcers in people with diabetes. (PubMed)

Skin grafting and tissue replacement for treating foot ulcers in people with diabetes. Foot ulceration is a major problem in people with diabetes and is the leading cause of hospitalisation and limb amputations. Skin grafts and tissue replacements can be used to reconstruct skin defects for people with diabetic foot ulcers in addition to providing them with standard care. Skin substitutes can consist of bioengineered or artificial skin, autografts (taken from the patient), allografts (taken (...) from another person) or xenografts (taken from animals).To determine the benefits and harms of skin grafting and tissue replacement for treating foot ulcers in people with diabetes.In April 2015 we searched: The Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. We also searched clinical trial registries to identify ongoing

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Cochrane

10. Prevention of Pressure Ulcers and Skin Degradation in Wheelchair Users: Guidelines

Prevention of Pressure Ulcers and Skin Degradation in Wheelchair Users: Guidelines Prevention of Pressure Ulcers and Skin Degradation in Wheelchair Users: Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Prevention of Pressure Ulcers and Skin Degradation in Wheelchair Users: Guidelines Prevention of Pressure Ulcers and Skin Degradation in Wheelchair Users: Guidelines Published on: October 7, 2015 Project Number: RA0810-000 Product Line: Research Type: Devices and Systems Report Type (...) : Reference List Result type: Report Question What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the management of heat and moisture in seating systems of wheelchair bound individuals? Key Message One evidence-based guideline regarding the management of heat and moisture for pressure ulcer prevention for wheelchair bound individuals was identified. Tags hot temperature, pressure ulcer, skin ulcer, wheelchairs, wounds and injuries, other miscellaneous topics, automated chair, cushion, decubitis, decubitus

2015 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

11. Skin grafting for venous leg ulcers. (PubMed)

Skin grafting for venous leg ulcers. Venous leg ulceration is a recurrent, chronic, disabling condition. It affects up to one in 100 people at some time in their lives. Standard treatments are simple dressings and compression bandages or stockings. Sometimes, despite treatment, ulcers remain open for months or years. Sometimes skin grafts are used to stimulate healing. These may be taken, or grown into a dressing, from the patient's own uninjured skin (autografts), or applied as a sheet (...) pads with an autograft delivered on porcine gelatin microbeads, the fifth trial (92 participants) compared a meshed graft with a cultured keratinocyte autograft, and the sixth trial (50 participants) compared a frozen keratinocyte allograft with a lyophilised (freeze-dried) keratinocyte allografts.Significantly more ulcers healed when treated with bilayer artificial skin than with dressings. There was insufficient evidence from the other trials to determine whether other types of skin grafting

2013 Cochrane

12. Predictive role of capillaroscopic skin ulcer risk index in systemic sclerosis: a multicentre validation study (PubMed)

Predictive role of capillaroscopic skin ulcer risk index in systemic sclerosis: a multicentre validation study Introduction The early detection of systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients at high risk of developing digital ulcers could allow preventive treatment, with a reduction of morbidity and social costs. In 2009, a quantitative score, the capillaroscopic skin ulcer risk index (CSURI), calculated according to the formula 'D×M/N(2'), was proposed, which was highly predictive of the appearance (...) of scleroderma digital ulcers within 3 months of capillaroscopic evaluation.This multicentre study aims to validate the predictive value and reproducibility of CSURI in a large population of SSc patients.CSURI was analysed in 229 unselected SSc patients by nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC). All patients were re-evaluated 3 months later with regard to the persistence and/or appearance of new digital ulcers.57 of 229 patients presented with digital ulcers after 3 months. The receiver operating characteristic

2012 EvidenceUpdates

13. The evidence for the use of growth factors and active skin substitutes for the treatment of non-infected diabetic foot ulcers (DFU): a health technology assessment (HTA)

The evidence for the use of growth factors and active skin substitutes for the treatment of non-infected diabetic foot ulcers (DFU): a health technology assessment (HTA) The evidence for the use of growth factors and active skin substitutes for the treatment of non-infected diabetic foot ulcers (DFU): a health technology assessment (HTA) The evidence for the use of growth factors and active skin substitutes for the treatment of non-infected diabetic foot ulcers (DFU): a health technology (...) assessment (HTA) Buchberger B, Follmann M, Freyer D, Huppertz H, Ehm A, Wasem J CRD summary This review concluded that add-on therapy with growth factors or active skin substitutes could be an alternative to standard wound care alone for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers, but their use could not be explicitly recommended without stronger evidence. These conclusions appropriately reflect the limitations of the evidence presented. Authors' objectives To assess the safety and effectiveness of growth factors

2011 DARE.

14. Randomised controlled trial: Skin protection wheelchair cushions for older nursing home residents reduce 6-month incidence of ischial tuberosity pressure ulcers compared with segmented foam cushions

Randomised controlled trial: Skin protection wheelchair cushions for older nursing home residents reduce 6-month incidence of ischial tuberosity pressure ulcers compared with segmented foam cushions Skin protection wheelchair cushions for older nursing home residents reduce 6-month incidence of ischial tuberosity pressure ulcers compared with segmented foam cushions | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage (...) wheelchair cushions for older nursing home residents reduce 6-month incidence of ischial tuberosity pressure ulcers compared with segmented foam cushions Article Text Care of the older person Randomised controlled trial Skin protection wheelchair cushions for older nursing home residents reduce 6-month incidence of ischial tuberosity pressure ulcers compared with segmented foam cushions Dimitri Beeckman 1 , 2 , Katrien Vanderwee 2 Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Brienza D , Kelsey S , Karg P

2011 Evidence-Based Nursing

15. Bioengineered skin in diabetic foot ulcers

Bioengineered skin in diabetic foot ulcers Bioengineered skin in diabetic foot ulcers Bioengineered skin in diabetic foot ulcers Teng YJ, Li YP, Wang JW, Yang KH, Zhang YC, Wang YJ, Tian JH, Ma B, Wang JM, Yan X CRD summary This review concluded that patients with diabetic foot ulcers might benefit from bioengineered skin due to its effectiveness, safety, and reduced risk of infections, compared with control treatment. The authors highlighted the various limitations of the studies included (...) in the review and acknowledged that these prevented them from drawing firm conclusions. The conclusions reflect the evidence presented. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of bioengineered skin in the treatment of patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Science Citation Index, Science Direct, Chinese Biomedical Database, CNKI, and Chinese Journals Full-text Database were searched. Search dates spanned

2010 DARE.

16. Skin replacement therapies for diabetic foot ulcers: Systematic review and meta-analysis (PubMed)

Skin replacement therapies for diabetic foot ulcers: Systematic review and meta-analysis 18162495 2008 08 06 2008 03 31 1935-5548 31 4 2008 Apr Diabetes care Diabetes Care Skin replacement therapies for diabetic foot ulcers: systematic review and meta-analysis. 693-4 Blozik Eva E Georg-August University of Göttingen, General Practice and Family Medicine, Humboldtallee 38, D-37073 Göttingen, Germany. eva.blozik@medizin.uni-goettingen.de Scherer Martin M eng Journal Article 2007 12 27 United (...) States Diabetes Care 7805975 0149-5992 IM Cell Culture Techniques Clinical Trials as Topic Diabetic Foot surgery Humans Patient Selection Skin cytology Skin Transplantation Treatment Outcome 2007 12 29 9 0 2008 8 7 9 0 2007 12 29 9 0 ppublish 18162495 dc07-2081 10.2337/dc07-2081

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2008 EvidenceUpdates

17. Skin replacement therapies for diabetic foot ulcers: systematic review and meta-analysis

Skin replacement therapies for diabetic foot ulcers: systematic review and meta-analysis Skin replacement therapies for diabetic foot ulcers: systematic review and meta-analysis Skin replacement therapies for diabetic foot ulcers: systematic review and meta-analysis Blozik E, Scherer M CRD summary This review found some hints that cultured skin equivalents may be a promising treatment for diabetic foot ulcers, but evidence was sparse and no recommendations could be made until high-quality (...) controlled studies were performed. There were some methodological limitations to the review, but the conclusions appear appropriate. Authors' objectives To investigate the effectiveness of skin replacement therapies in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Searching MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE and CINAHL were searched to September 2007. Search terms were not reported. Study selection Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of participants of any age with diabetic leg

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2008 DARE.

18. Influence of bioengineered skin substitutes on diabetic foot ulcer and venous leg ulcer outcomes

Influence of bioengineered skin substitutes on diabetic foot ulcer and venous leg ulcer outcomes Influence of bioengineered skin substitutes on diabetic foot ulcer and venous leg ulcer outcomes Influence of bioengineered skin substitutes on diabetic foot ulcer and venous leg ulcer outcomes Barber C, Watt A, Pham C, Humphreys K, Penington A, Mutimer K, Edwards M, Maddern G CRD summary This review evaluated the safety and effectiveness of bioengineered skin substitutes compared with standard (...) dressings and/or autografts when used on chronic wounds. It found that bioengineered skin substitutes (with a dermal component) may improve healing outcomes in diabetic foot ulcers and venous leg ulcers. Lack of reporting of statistical tests means the reliability of the authors' conclusions is unclear. Authors' objectives To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of bioengineered skin substitutes compared with standard dressings and/or standard autografts when used on chronic wounds. Searching MEDLINE

2008 DARE.

19. Transplantation of cultured skin (Apligraf(R)) in treating venous leg ulcers - early assessment briefs (Alert)

Transplantation of cultured skin (Apligraf(R)) in treating venous leg ulcers - early assessment briefs (Alert) Transplantation of cultured skin (Apligraf(R)) in treating venous leg ulcers - early assessment briefs (Alert) Transplantation of cultured skin (Apligraf(R)) in treating venous leg ulcers - early assessment briefs (Alert) Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member (...) of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care. Transplantation of cultured skin (Apligraf(R)) in treating venous leg ulcers - early assessment briefs (Alert) Stockholm: Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) 2003 Authors' objectives This review aims to assess the available evidence on transplantation of cultured skin (Apligraf(R)) in treating venous leg ulcers. Authors

2003 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

20. Transplantation of cultured skin (Apligraf®) in treating venous leg ulcers</a>

Transplantation of cultured skin (Apligraf®) in treating venous leg ulcers Transplantation of cultured skin (Apligraf®) in treating venous leg ulcers We use cookies on this website. By using this site, you agree that we may store and access cookies on your device. Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services Transplantation of cultured skin (Apligraf®) in treating venous leg ulcers Share: Reading time approx. 7 minutes This document was published more (...) . The dominating therapy is compression treatment. Transplantation of the patients own tissue (autologous transplantation) is used to treat hard-to-heal ulcers, but new methods involving cultured skin have been developed that utilize other human tissue. A major advantage of this method, compared to autologous transplantation, is sparing the patient from treatment demanding skin defects secondary to graft skin harvesting. Apligraf® is one type of cultured human skin equivalent. This material is cultured from

2003 Swedish Council on Technology Assessement